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Avis pulled a semi-fast one on me

in France, after I got home I noticed that I had supposedly agreed to be charged using the infamous DCC rate instead of being billed in Euros and letting my credit card do the change. I did some quick math using the credit card statement and while the rates didn't match, they weren't all that far apart. Just a cost of travel, somebody's gonna make money off you somehow someway.

Posted by
8293 posts

I don't know why this post is is in the Travel Scams department. You did not get scammed. You just didn't pay attention to what you were signing. So often people are quick to call an error in judgement a "scam".

Posted by
507 posts

Phred,

To me it was not an error in your judgement, because you may have failed to check the final statement thoroughly, {add-on: which can happen to anyone.}

It is a reminder to the rest of us to not be rushed to sign anything, ask for the straight cost in the money of the country we are in, & circle the amount we agree to pay.

Posted by
2860 posts

While I agree that the word "scam" is overused, DCC is definitely qualifies as a scam, despite being widely engaged in by those most reputable of institutions, big banks and car rental agencies, so famous for their high standards of integrity. Here's why. There is no advantage to the traveler. In fact, there is one sure disadvantage and a possible second. First, you get a worse exchange rate. That's why the banks invented the process. Second, if you have a credit or debit card that charges a currency conversion fee, you will probably still incur that charge. The need for constant vigilance is one stressor while traveling, and I think the previous posters are engaging in blame-the-victim thinking here, with their comments to the effect that he wasn't careful enough. Phred has done us a service by calling our attention to this issue. To those who are happy to allow the banks, etc. to extract more from ordinary people, while their own coffers are overflowing, I say, "go in good health." As for me, I don't believe in letting those institutions run wild with their subterfuges, even though the additional cost may not be a lot. It's quite easy to pay attention and refuse DCC, once you know about the practice.

Posted by
8293 posts

As Roslyn said .... It is so easy to pay attention and refuse DCC.

Posted by
1406 posts

Yes, it's easy to refuse when the option is offered. My point was, it was in the fine print and I wasn't given the option, at which point I would have refused.

But my other point was, in the end the difference wasn't that much.

Posted by
10892 posts

phred; I go on vacation to relax; among other things. Like you I am not going to suffer over a minor gaff on my part. Compare your "loss" to the total cost of the trip and did it increase the cost of your vacation by even 1%. Thanks for the head up to look at the fine print and thanks for the reminder that some companies do this sort of thing.