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Is this considered duel voltage?

My husband & I will be traveling to Poland & Lithuania next year. I'm trying to figure out what we already have that is duel voltage. I looked at my flat iron & it says 120-240v 50/60Hz 48w max - would it be ok to use with just a converter for the plug?

Posted by
15588 posts

Sounds like it will be fine. Just wondering about the need for a travel iron on the trip. Its extra weight you'll be hauling and many hotels have loner irons. You might confirm in advance.

Posted by
2322 posts

Should be fine.

Sam, she means a flat iron, i.e. a hair iron (right?). I am not aware of any hotels that have these - hair dryers, and clothes irons yes, hair irons no. Decide if using it is worth the space in your suitcase and, more importantly to me, the time it will take to use it on your hair. I bring my hair iron only on trips where I have a "dress-up" type occasion, like an opera or a fancy celebration dinner. In those cases I will use it when getting dressed for the occasion and maybe on days when I have more time. Most days I go without it because it takes 20-30 minutes I'd rather spend somewhere other than the hotel room.

Posted by
20688 posts

I am kind of stickler for correct terms in this area since it can cause serious problems if there is a misunderstanding. What you need is plug adapter - accepts a US plug on one side and plugs into the European socket on the other side. Simple and cheap. A converter refers to a voltage converter that changes existing 240 volts in Europe to 120v for an Am device requiring a 120v input only - not a range.

Even though your iron is rated for a 120-240 input it might preform as well with the 240 as it normal does at home so don't be surprise if it doesn't get as hot. Also make sure there is not a switch somewhere that you need to change to 240. Older models often had switch that had to be changed. Newer devices handle that internal via electronics. Check to be sure.

Posted by
17692 posts

Are you planning to fight a duel with this device? What voltage is needed for a duel? I think you mean "dual" voltage.

Yes, it should be usable in Europe. If it does have a voltage switch, make sure you switch it to 240V before leaving home (maybe tape it in the high voltage position. Plugging it into a European receptacle with the switch in the 120V position will result in a display better than July 4th.

Also, if it has a "polarized" plug (one blade wider than the other, so it only goes into receptacles over here one way), never leave it plugged in over there when not in use. That polarized plug is there for safety, probably to prevent an internal short from causing it to turn on unexpectedly, but that safety feature will be lost with an unpolarized power source like most continental European ones (also with a two pin Europlug adapter).

Posted by
15588 posts

Webster's dictionary gives the definition of a "flat iron" as:

historical
1. an iron that was heated and used for pressing clothes.
2. a heated device for straightening and styling hair.

Having straight hair, I assumed the first definition was what was referred to by the OP.

Another definition: "panic"

the look on a woman's face when she discovers that her American hair styling apparatus will not work in Europe.

Saw it with my own eyes.

Posted by
31037 posts

cp,

Based on the information you've posted, the flat iron should work fine in Europe with just a Plug Adaptor. One additional question - does the flat iron have a two pin or three pin (grounded) plug?

I'd suggest packing along at least two Plug Adaptors as they're small and easily misplaced. You can check this website to determine which type of Plug Adaptors to buy.....

http://www.power-plugs-sockets.com/poland/ (Lithuania appears to use a similar style to Poland)

It would be a good idea to check the device to determine whether it has a switch to select input voltage. If it does have a switch, set it to the 220 volt position when you pack it in your luggage.

Posted by
17692 posts

Sam - your definition of panic is priceless!

Ken - Based on what I have seen around, the hair straightener undoubtedly has a non-grounding, two blade polarizing plug.

Poland uses a French style Schuko receptacle with a protruding ground pin. Lithuania uses the German style Schuko receptacle with grounding clips on the side. Most grounding adapters have provisions to be used in either style receptacle, but she will most likely just use the two pin, non-grounding, non-polarizing Europlug adapter.

Posted by
1175 posts

Just want to point out that Conair has a "mini-Pro" series of hair tools that are dual volatage and about 3/4 to 1/2 the size of the regular tools. I have the mini-Pro 2-in-1 tool that I can use as a flat iron or as a curling iron. It has one heat setting. It comes with a thermal case so you can pack it away while hot. The tool is around 6 inches long, making it easy to pack.
The mini tools work well for shorter hair. They are a disaster for longer hair. It takes along time to style with them.

Posted by
31037 posts

Lee,

I wasn't sure what type of plug the appliance might have, but thought it would be a good idea to mention it. I've never had a flat iron or whatever in the house, so wasn't able to check.

Posted by
17692 posts

I don't get it.

Do the people who want to use hair straighteners have curly hair like the hair the people who want to use hair curlers want? Maybe we can just do brain transplants.

Ken - I wanted to know what kind of safety protection was provided by the polarizing plug, so I went to the thrift store to find one. there must have been fifty of them hanging from pegs in the store - something like 99¢ each. All of them had polarizing plugs. I bought one, brought it home, and took it apart. The only the thing I could see was that the single pole switch was on the hot leg, so that an internal short would not cause the device to come on unattended. But that safety protection wouldn't work if the power source was oppositely polarized, which could happen on most continental European sources.