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Hearing aid voltage convertor

Looking for suggestions for the best voltage convertor to use in Europe. My husband has rechargeable. hearing aids and we will be on the 21 Day Best of Europe Tour and wondering what he might need.
Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Posted by
27428 posts

are you sure that the charger isn't universal? does the printing on the charger say 120v 60Hz or something different like 50-240vAC 50-60Hz?

Posted by
5769 posts

Yes, start by looking at the charger input voltage requirements, should be printed on the charger.

If for some reason, the charger is limited to 110 or 120 Volts, charging batteries is a low wattage application, so a very simple convertor will work, in the range of about $20. If the input is 110V-240V, then only a very basic adapter for a couple bucks is needed.

Posted by
44 posts

Thank you both we were able to see the voltage on the charger and it looks as if only an adapter will be needed.

Posted by
27428 posts

that's a result.

one more thing to check off...

Posted by
18230 posts

I'd like to expand on what Paul said.

First, for those who don't already know, I'll give definitions of adapter and converter.

An adapter is a simple mechanical device that has one type of plug (ex. German/French Schuko) on one end and another type receptacle (ex. for a US plug) on the other end. It just allows us to use a US plug in a German receptacle. It does not change the voltage. Here is an example of an adapter.

A converter changes the voltage, for example from 220V in to 110V out. It probably also changes the plug configuration, like an adapter. There are two types of converters. A transformer can convert from any voltage to any voltage, but the ratio is fixed (ex 240V to 120V). For low wattage (ex 40W for battery charging) applications, transformers can be small and lightweight, but to power a 1600W hair dryer, a transformer would be prohibitively heavy. So electrical engineers "invented" a lightweight electronic converter, which uses transistors to limit the output to a some desired voltage (ex 120 volts). These can handle 1600W without being heavy.
However, the resulting wave form of the power is not appropriate for input into electronic devices, so for those a transformer is necessary.

In his post, Paul said,

If for some reason, the charger is limited to 110 or 120 Volts, charging batteries
is a low wattage application, so a very simple convertor will work

Technically (sorry, Paul), whether the input is 110/120 volts or 120/240 volts, charging batteries is still a low wattage application. For low wattage applications you can use a simple (transformer) converter.

There are three different types of voltage inputs.

Single voltage: 120V or 240V would be examples.

Dual voltage: Devices, like curling irons, that have resistive elements. have a switch to put them in parallel (for 120V input) or series (for 240V input). The inputs voltages are always in the same ratio for a specific device. They can be used either on US voltage or European voltage, depending on how the switch is set.

Multi-voltage: Most electronic devices today accept a range of voltages, from 120 to 240 (probably higher although I know no place where nominal household voltage is higher than 240V) with a fixed output voltage. I think today some high wattage devices, like hair dryers and curling irons, have an feflectronic converter built in, so you don't have to worry about having a switch set correctly for the input voltage. USB chargers are actually multi-voltage converters, accepting 100-240 VAC and converting it to 5 VDC.

Posted by
5769 posts

If for some reason, the charger is limited to 110 or 120 Volts, charging batteries
is a low wattage application, so a very simple convertor will work

Technically (sorry, Paul), whether the input is 110/120 volts or 120/240 volts, charging batteries is still a low wattage application. For low wattage applications you can use a simple (transformer) converter.

No apologies needed, my point was that if the OP's charger was limited to 110/120V input, then only a low wattage converter is needed. If the input to the charger was 120/240 V, yes it is still low wattage of course, but only an adapter is needed, wattage is not an issue. Using a converter on something with a 110/240V device probably would cause no harm, unnecessary in the least, but could cause some problems whether due to wattage, how the converter controls the voltage peaks and waveform, and the effect on the built in power supply of the device.