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Does anybody know how to change the resolution of a jpeg?

Any photographers/graphic artists out there? I went to Germany last month and only took about a billion pictures. lol. All on an Android phone. I'm in the process of making a Shutterfly book and half of the pics are giving me the 'low resolution' warning. Some are fine but others aren't. We've gone through Paint and changed the DPI to 600 but that still isn't working. It just keeps on saying low resolution.
Does anybody know what to do? Or am I stuck.

Thanks in advance! Judy

PS: If anybody here does this for a living, or knows someone who does, I am willing to pay. Not expecting a freebie.

Posted by
1490 posts

Here's a Shutterfly article that addresses this.

https://support.shutterfly.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1187/~/photo-resolution-tips

The issue is not that you should change the resolution of your photos. It's that you are trying to print images that are too large for the quality of the photo you took. You might not be happy with the results. Your only option would be to print a smaller version of the image.

For the future, if you're planning to create picture books, you can increase the resolution before you take pictures with your phone. It's in the camera app settings. But you can't really improve the quality of photos you've already taken.

Posted by
416 posts

I saw that in Shutterfly's help section. Crap. half of my pics are too low of a resolution. This book won't turn out then. I am so disappointed.

Posted by
1940 posts

What a shame! Once a photo is taken, I don't know of any way to increase the resolution. Maybe someone else has an idea for you.

For next time, try to change the photo resolution on your phone before taking photos. I'm not familiar with Androids but I imagine there's a setting to increase the resolution.

However I have been able to use some "low resolution" photos in Shutterfly books. Just keep reducing the size of your photo box until the low resolution warning goes away, and they'll print just fine. Sometimes they get pretty small. If you have a group of those small photos you could choose one of the grid layouts, which can be fun.

Unfortunately, you won't be able to use any of those photos in lovely full page spreads. But at least you haven't lost them altogether.

Posted by
158 posts

I haven't made a Shutterfly book but I have printed photos that have a low resolution warning. They came out fine, of course a little grainy but still worth having a copy printed in my opinion. For a book, I would follow the advice to make the size of the photo smaller and still make the book.

Posted by
4958 posts

You can try "upsampling." This will increase the resolution of the original pictures by adding more pixels - software guesses where they should be. However, note that you may not be thrilled with the results. Upsampling can work to a degree but too much upsampling will degrade the quality of the picture anyway, defeating the purpose.

I'm not sure you can upsample with Paint - I doubt it. I use a free image editing program called GIMP. It's a very powerful program, though unfortunately it's also a bit complex to learn. There are a lot of tutorials online, but it may still take you a long time to figure out. If you can use some free version of Photoshop or Paint Shop Pro on a Windows PC, that might work for you too. I wouldn't be surprised if there are websites that will upsmple for you automatically - it's a fairly easy thing to do.

You might simply try printing a few of your questionable phone pictures before making a book and see how they look without any upsampling. Print at about the same size they would be printed in the book. (8x10?). FYI, photo websites that sell prints will automatically resample your images before printing and may upsample automatically. Shutterfly probably does the same thing when they make their books. If the prints you make look OK, then try the book.

If you want to print out pictures or make books in the future, I suggest you buy a real camera. Phone cameras, even with higher resolution, usually can't deliver the quality of a real camera. Yes, some of the expensive phones like iPhones, Pixels, and Samsung phones may have great phone cameras but you'll still get better quality with a good camera.

Posted by
333 posts

I’ve printed many Shutterfly books and have dealt with the “low res” issue. Most of the time they print just fine- as you see it on your previews. If you’re enlarging it a great deal- such as 5x7 size or larger, it might be a bit grainy. What you can do if you’re too worried is to print the picture in a similar size on a regular piece of paper (assuming you have a printer) and judge the quality yourself. As I said, most will be just fine. Shutterfly is just covering their bases.
Lisa

Posted by
5792 posts

You cannot add information to a photo once saved. In the old days when storage was at a premium, a lot of folks would save images at excessively low resolutions. The low-rez photos would look good on a small screen but would look pixelated when printed in a large format.

Photoshop does allow you to "sharpen" images by enhancing edge definition. But "sharpen" does not add information (more pixels), it just makes the edges look less blurry and more definitive. See: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop-elements/using/sharpening.html

Sharpening enhances the definition of edges in an image. Whether your
images come from a digital camera or a scanner, most images can
benefit from sharpening. When sharpening images, keep the following in
mind:

Sharpening cannot correct a severely blurred image.

Sharpen your image on a separate layer so that you can resharpen it
later if you need to change the adjustment. Set the layer’s blending
mode to Luminosity to avoid color shifts along edges. If you find that
highlights or shadows are lessened after you sharpen, use the layer
blending controls to prevent sharpening in highlights and shadows.

If you need to reduce image noise, do so before sharpening so that you
don’t intensify the noise.

Sharpen your image multiple times in small amounts. Sharpen the first
time to correct blur captured by a scanner or digital camera. After
you’ve color corrected and resized your image, sharpen it again.

If possible, judge your sharpening by outputting your image. The
amount of sharpening needed varies depending on whether the image is
printed or displayed on a web page.

Posted by
5792 posts

In you must do an upsample to get the service to accept the image for printing, you can do that with Photoshop at the risk of degrading the image. See: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop-elements/using/resizing.html

Resample an image

Changing the pixel dimensions of an image is called resampling.
Resampling affects not only the size of an image onscreen, but also
its image quality and its printed output—either its printed dimensions
or its image resolution. Resampling can degrade image quality. When
you downsample, meaning that you decrease the number of pixels in your
image, information is removed from the image. When you upsample, or
increase the number of pixels in your image, new pixels are added
based on the color values of existing pixels, and the image loses some
detail and sharpness.

To avoid the need for upsampling, scan or create the image at the
resolution required for your printer or output device. If you want to
preview the effects of changing pixel dimensions onscreen or print
proofs at different resolutions, resample a duplicate of your file.

Posted by
21867 posts

This is not for Judy but for other readers. An average point and shoot would have provided better quality pictures. There are limitations to a phone camera.

Posted by
4958 posts

Frank, not all phone cameras are the same. I have a cheap phone which has a terrible camera. I use it only for throw-away snapshots - would never dream of using it for vacation pictures (it doesn't even have a flash). I have much nicer cameras including a couple of DSLRs. But, some people have really nice phones with excellent cameras. There are plenty of examples of these online - some of those pictures are surprisingly good, but they don't tempt me to buy a better phone just for the camera.

Posted by
416 posts

Live and learn. Ugh. This was probably my one and only shot at a vacation. My last one was 20 years ago, in 1997. Yes you read that correctly. Never did I think about making this photo book until recently. Pics look great on the phone or the computer.

Shutterfly is running a promo for a free 8X8 book, I think I'll drop a bunch of the low resolution photos on the free promo book just to see what it looks like when it prints out. All I'd be out is shipping and handling. That way I could see just exactly how blurry (or not) these low resolution photos really are. Sigh......

Thank you all for your replies.

Posted by
1490 posts

Judy, I know how disappointing this can be.

An option that might please you well, plus will make it easy to share your photos with friends and family, is to upload them to an online photo sharing app, like Google photos or Flickr, or even on Facebook. (There are countless others, and most are free or very low cost.)

Your lower resolution photos are optimized for storing on the web and usually display perfectly well there.

Posted by
416 posts

Lane-- this book is for me!! A lasting lifetime memory book.

Wahhh wahhh.......

Posted by
2724 posts

Judy, I do remember, I also dealt with this. Just make the box smaller and the warning will go away. Try it. What kind of computer are you using? On my iMac I edit all my photos before starting my book. I’ve also used iPhoto to make a book.

Geez.

Posted by
416 posts

Paul... I can absolutely make the boxes smaller. Problem is, there goes half of the picture. 😢

Posted by
5792 posts

FYI here are web links to what Shutterfly recommends regarding image resolution:

https://support.shutterfly.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1187/~/photo-resolution-tips

https://support.shutterfly.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/307

Photo Books : Recommended Photo Resolutions

Published 09/26/2005 04:39 PM | Updated 06/14/2017 12:02 AM For
Photo Books, we recommend the following resolutions (in pixels):

12x12, 11x14, and 10x10 Photo Book: at least 2000 x 1600 8x8, 8x11,
and 7x9 Photo Books: at least 1600 x 1200

Posted by
408 posts

If you have Photoshop or if you download the free Paint.net app, you can up the resolution on your pictures. I taught yearbook for years, and we were always having to do this for senior pictures, etc. that kids were taking off their phones. I have found that if you bump the resolution up to 180, it is usually enough for the photobooks. In Photoshop, it is under Image-Adjustments-Image Size and in Paint, it is under Resize. You will see a box for the resolution. It takes a bit of time to adjust all your pictures, but it is worth it for the quality. Hope this helps.

Posted by
416 posts

We redid one pic up to 600 DPI and I still get the low resolution warning. Or is that not what I want?

Posted by
4958 posts

Changing the resolution isn't the same as upsampling. If you simply change the resolution, you're only changing one number in the file - the DPI number. You need to change (add) pixels. Perhaps you need to "scale" the image.

By the way, try not to change your original JPEG (JPG) files at all! JPEG is a "lossy" format, meaning each time you save, close, and then open the file, you lose some quality. Try saving in a different format like PNG if you make any changes at all, but keep your original JPEG files separate - don't edit them directly.

Posted by
4958 posts

"Resolution" is just a ratio - dots per inch or "dots divided by inches" (DPI). DPI it's meaningless unless related to a physical size. Changing something from 150DPI to 600DPI (dots per inch) is easy - change one number in the image file. What you care about is the DPI at a specific size you're printing at - like 4"x6". An image that is 2000x3000 pixels would have a DPI of 500 DPI (2000 divided by 4). But at print size 12"x18" it would have a DPI of only 167 DPI (2000 divided by 12 inches). If you tell me you need 300DPI for a 12"x18" print, you'd need to upsample ('scale") the picture so it is 3600x5400 pixels.

Various programs will let you scale/upsample by changing various parameters - the inches, the pixels (dots), or the DPI, perhaps two at a time. How this works depends on the software you are using, but the result is something with more pixels when you are done.e

Posted by
3709 posts

Apple has done a great job of marketing the photo capabilities of the iPhone, but the fact remains that a larger lens and larger sensor will produce a better result, more "substance" to the image.

Although I use Shutterfly for books, I do not get the clarity of the image in those books, there's always a blur factor that won't show up in a reprint of the same image. And the free book will cost $8 shipping.

Posted by
1068 posts

Apple has done a great job of marketing the photo capabilities of the iPhone, but the fact remains that a larger lens and larger sensor will produce a better result, more "substance" to the image.

True, true. There are other factors as well which make a true "camera" picture "better" (in technical terms rather than artistically) than one from a phone, it is just the physics of capturing light. To be fair, camera vs phone all depends on what you want to do with your pics whether a phone is good enough or not. Also, the conditions under which you shoot. Low lighting, telephoto, or "action" shots will clearly show the deficits of a cell phone. However, for the first time I tried my cell as my back-up camera when I went to Europe this year. Obviously I was glad I had my full-frame camera for (to me) "important" shots, but it was fine when I went out to dinner or snapped a quick pic when I hopped off the bus.

As to the OP, there has been some good advice about trying to salvage your low res pictures, so I won't repeat it. But I will add there that when upsampling there are several algorithms, so if you have a program which allows you to try different ones, do so and one may produce better results than the others. Also, as stated jpeg is a lossy compression and resaving a photo will degrade the image, however rather than a png format, I would save the new ones as a tif, which (IMHO) has some advantages over png. Don't forget, after upsampling and editing, you will have to reconvert the tif to jpeg. Here is some info on tif files, editing them and converting them. Good luck. I have also failed to notice I was not taking the "quality" of photos I wanted and it is a disheartening experience.

Posted by
416 posts

Well. Thank you to ALL who took the time to answer. I appreciate it. Most of the suggestions were way over my head. (I'm not very tech-y) But I do appreciate it anyway. I will start with the easiest and most simple solution offered, and work my way up from there. If there is a way, I'll find it. Thanks again.

Posted by
379 posts

There are limitations to a phone camera.

True, but a good phone camera in the hands of a knowledgeable photographer can produce great (in size and aesthetic) images.

https://techcrunch.com/2016/07/15/shot-on-iphone/

OP did not mention her phone camera's resolution. Most modern phone cameras' resolutions are sufficient for printing in an 8"x8" book, without upsampling. Unless the phone camera's resolution is set too low, by mistake. OP?

Posted by
416 posts

No Earthly idea. Lol. Samsung galaxy s7 if that helps.

I have fiddled around with the settings enough that I have no idea what anything is.

Posted by
4958 posts

Judy, at this point I suggest just printing some of your JPEG files as-is and see how they look. You can just get them printed at Costco or a local photo lab to get an idea - choose the same approximate size they'd be printed in the book. They might look good enough.

Posted by
416 posts

Shutterfly has a promo running right now where you get a free 8X8 book so I think I'll dump in all my low resolution photos into the free disposable book and see how things look. They may be fine. Or they may look horrible. If they're horrible, then I sure have a lot of advice on how to make them less so. Thanks to all!!

Posted by
5792 posts

FYI Shutterfly has a print services with pickup at your local Target store: https://www.shutterfly.com/target/info.jsp

When you need glossy prints fast, order online and pick them up at
your local Target Photo Store in as little as an hour.

As a Shutterfly customer, they often run the "free" 8x8 photo book offering. I have also taken advantage of the "free" (except for shipping and handling" 101 print offer.

Posted by
379 posts

The 12MP camera of the Samsung galaxy s7 can easily produce prints size up to 11"x14". and even larger.

https://improvephotography.com/34880/how-big-print-with-megapixel-camera/

Check the phone's "Picture Size" setting to make sure that the resolution is set at 12MP.

https://www.att.com/devicehowto/tutorial.html#!/interactive/id/interactive_1500011016?make=Samsung&model=SamsungG935A

And in more detail:

http://gadgetguideonline.com/s7/sasmung-galaxy-s7-how-to-guides/how-to-set-galaxy-s7-camera-picture-size-and-video-size-on-galaxy-s7-and-galaxy-s7-edge/

Better having this problem fixed once and for all in the camera, than dealing with low resolution photos after each trip.

Posted by
31524 posts

Judy,

A few thoughts to add to the others......

Most phone cameras save photos in JPG format, which means there's not a lot of manipulation possible with them as a lot of the detail is stripped out of the photo when it's compressed. Each time the photo is altered and then re-saved, more detail is lost. The bottom line is that there are limits on what you'll be able to do with JPG images. The suggestions mentioned so far are worth trying but I doubt that significant improvement will be possible.

Camera+ is a camera app for iOS that allows for RAW images which provides more control, but I don't think that particular app is available for Android. The newest versions of the iOS camera may also now provide that capability. This app for Android might be worth a try - http://download.cnet.com/Snapseed/3000-12511_4-75819982.html

If you're planning any future trips, you might find this forum discussion interesting - https://community.ricksteves.com/travel-forum/tech-tips/camera-vs-iphone

Good luck!

Posted by
416 posts

Very cool. Thank you. A lot of reading for sure! The weird thing that I don't understand is, most of the pictures on the phone are jpegs while a few dozen or so are pngs. How the heck did that happen? Same phone, same everything. Same place, even. I took one pic and it saved as a jpeg. I turned around and took another which was saved as a png.

I should stick to stuff I know. Lol

Posted by
1940 posts

Judy --
I think it's a good idea to make a test book for just the $8 shipping charge. It'll also let you get familiar with the program for when you make your big book.

Since you're using this as a throw-away test, you might want to try the same photo in multiple sizes, to see how big you can get it before it looks too fuzzy. Make one the small size that gives you no warning. Then make it progressively bigger. Put these all on two facing pages so you can compare the clarity and decide what your maximum size would be for a photo with this resolution.

Try this method with a couple of photos, if you have differing resolutions. Sounds like you have a mixture ... some low res, some high res, some jpgs, some pngs. To use in a Shutterfly book, I think you need to change the pngs to jpgs, which I believe you can do in Paint.

By the way, you can increase or decrease the size of photo boxes without cropping the picture. You have to be in edit mode, then grab a corner of the box and drag, to make it bigger or smaller. Call Shutterfly's help desk if this sounds confusing.

I hope you're able to salvage enough photos to make a good book of memories.

Posted by
416 posts

Charlene... yes, definitely. The throw away book will be a great thing to use to judge how the pictures look. I do understand how to manipulate the photos, increase or decrease the sizes, change from a png to a jpg, etc. I've started taking the advice of some of the posts here, starting with the easiest solutions first. I keep on saying I want this book done by Christmas and my husband will always reply, In 2018?

Sigh......