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Website comparing airline carry-on dimensions

Several weeks ago I found a website that provided a grid of different airlines and their carry on dimensions. You could type in your carry on and see if it would fit. Of course I forgot to bookmark it, and now I can't find it again. Any suggestions?

Posted by
3714 posts

I did a Google search using the words "airline carry on size comparison" and found many examples, none of them complete, often mixing and matching inches with centimeters. There are many other ways to search for this concept which appear at the end of the first results page. These are the ones I bookmarked for me. If you see one you recognize here or elsewhere, please post it. I, for one, am interested in this topic, too.

Here we go:

http://www.worldtraveler.com/international-carry-on-size

http://www.skyscanner.net/news/cabin-luggage-guide-hand-baggage-sizes-and-weight-restrictions

http://wikitravel.org/en/Airline_baggage

http://www.travelsmith.com/wcsstore/images/TravelSmith/email/LuggageGuidelines.pdf

http://www.farecompare.com/about/worldwide-baggage-fee-chart/#/

Posted by
16883 posts

Any of those might be handy if you're shopping for luggage, but reconfirm details with your air carrier if booking a ticket, since details are always subject to change.

Posted by
18384 posts

The first link by Lo, WorldTraveler.com shows the allowable weight for SAS as 8 kg/18 # and for Lufthansa as 8 kg (but nowhere is 17 # mentioned on the Lufthansa website. (Note: 8 kg = 17.6 #). So if you are flying SAS, how do they decide which weight limit applies to whom? Do the Americans get 8.18 kg (18 #) while the European can only take 8 kg?

Posted by
5792 posts

Lee's query: "Do the Americans get 8.18 kg (18 #) while the European can only take 8 kg?" reminds me of the mathematician-engineer joke.

A mathematician, an engineer, and a physicist were taking a math class together. One day the mathematician and the physicist decided to play a joke on the engineer. They told him that the pretty girl sitting at the back of the room said he could get close to her every time they ringed the bell, but he could only travel half the distance from him to her. So they started ringing the bell and the engineer would travel half the distance, and the mathematician and the physicist were making fun of him. They thought it was really funny. When the engineer was 1/16 the original distance they asked him, “why are you doing this? You do know you are never going to get there right?” And the engineer replied, “I will get close enough for practical purposes.”

Posted by
18384 posts

Where's the lawyer? Every a ... and a ... and a ... joke must include a lawyer ("who says I'll sue all of you").

Posted by
11455 posts

Yes, Lee, Americans do get the 18 lbs. It says so on the SAS website:

www.flysas.com/en/us/travel-info/baggage/cabin-baggage

I'm guessing the airline is not run by engineers who need to be precise but by business people who show a little leeway.

It's like those who believe the maximum measurements of soft-sided bags are rigid measurements no matter how they're packed.