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traveling pants and waterproof rain jacket

I have made several trips to southern Europe but now am going to England and Edinburgh next summer (mid June). I have not taken pants to Europe but am thinking it might be a good thing this time (previously skirts and capris). I don't own any pants I would travel with for a couple weeks so I am looking for suggestions of what works well traveling. I have some J.J. Jill clothes and saw they have a Wherever line. Has anyone worn them traveling? I am looking for comfort, tolerating being packed, and drying relatively quickly hung up. We have an apartment half way through our trip for 4 days with a washer but no dryer.

Also, I want to buy a water proof rain jacket-preferably one that packs into itself. If it was breathable, I might wear it at home (generally just run fast!) I tried on one by Columbia today that I liked (waterproof and breathable) except it didn't compress. I was hoping there might be something that would. I have a down jacket that I travel with in winter that folds into its own pocket which I love.

Beth

Posted by
4376 posts

I have an Eddie Bauer raincoat that packs/compresses into one of its pockets. I purchased mine at an outlet store, but I would guess than any Eddie Bauer would have similar. I don't have any specific pants to recommend other than saying no jeans, they take forever to dry.

Posted by
5792 posts

My Patagonia 2.5 layered Gore-tex hooded rain jacket is pushing 20 years and is my go-to for adventure travel (winter ski tours, spring UK walking trips). A nearly 20 year old Columbia rain jacket is my around town wear and still holding up. Here's a link as to what 2, 2.5 and 3 layer Gore-tex means: https://coolhikinggear.com/what-does-2-2-5-and-3-layer-construction-in-a-rain-jacket-mean
The bottom line is light weight and packable involves performance trade-offs especially on compression.

My rain pants are not name brand pants but generally work except in extreame downpours (with sideways driven rain). My pants are full side zip so that I can put them on without taking my boots off, but the side zip may be an entrypoint for water.

Posted by
9929 posts

I'd look at fabric content labels for your pants. I have a pr of Costco travel pants I got last year that work well but otherwise, often take jeans that are cotton/poly blends. I'd recommend you do some trial washes at home....at least wet them like you are washing them, roll in a towel then hang to dry and time it to see how long it takes. I've found that sometimes even if things have similar fabric content they can sometimes take different times to dry. Very weird.

Many like the Marmot Precip. I used to use one and could fold it up flat into a ziplock bag and put it in my purse but I decided it was cut too slim for me to zip a purse up underneath it. It looks like you are looking at waterproof and that is the right decision. I think the Marmot folded into a pocket but that always made it too wrinkled for my taste, especially if you are trying to put it in when it is still wet.

Posted by
1331 posts

My wife and I both have Columbia rain coats that pack into a pocket and are breathable. We both wore them on a trip to England this past June and do wear them at home. They had a great selection at the store we shopped at.

Posted by
1179 posts

Many “stylish” waterproof raincoats don’t zip into themselves. They do roll up nicely though, and are packable inside a purse.

Columbia, REI, Northface, Marmot all have good looking raincoats for travel. Most of them are under 1 lb with taped seams.

You can get lighter coats that pack into themselves but these are not as good looking. They look like windbreakers.

Gortex is heavy and overkill unless you are participating in an athletic outdoor adventure with sweating. For most tourist urban adventures a coated waterproofing is sufficient.

Posted by
13222 posts

I have a pair of these J. Jill Wearever pulll-on pants and they are very comfortable.

https://www.jjill.com/product/wearever-smooth-fit-slim-leg-pants

However, I have not taken them on trips. The knit is fairly substantial and I question whether it would dry quickly without a clothes dryer. In my experience, wovens are faster-drying than knits.l. Also these seem too warm for summer wear.

What I have taken to Europe several times is these Eddie Bauer stretch twill pants:

http://www.eddiebauer.com/product/womens-bremerton-stayshape-stretch-twill-pants/21107581

They are a good weight for summer, have a side zip, and no waistband or pockets, so they have a very smooth line; very flattering. On trips I have sink-washed them and they dry overnight after being pressed in a towel. And they are on sale right now.

Posted by
1203 posts

When buying a raincoat, I look for waterproof, breathable, and wind proof. I have a marmot precip and it worked really well A couple of year ago, I bought a Costco version of the Marmot (for about 1/4 of the price) and it has worked just as well. However, rain coats and shoes are things that I look more at quality than price. It is a good idea to carry the coat in a plastic bag so that you have something to put it in when it is wet.

Posted by
1795 posts

Well, I am going to be in London and Edinburgh but also am hiking for three or four days in Cotswolds and York. I would trade fashion for function but don't know if that means I should buy something with Gortex or not. I am not a die hard hiker and if it were truly pouring in the morning, I would find an alternative activity. But I know the weather in the UK is not predictable so it might change during the day. As I said, I do not own a raincoat even though it rains in Florida every day for 5 months. We all have a pile of umbrellas and it is hot so a coat is not appealing.

I will look at the brands people recommended.

Beth

Posted by
57 posts

I did two Rick Steves trips this year—one in June and the other in August. For the first time, I took the Athleta Trekkie Hike Pant in three different colors and LOVED them. They were so light and comfy and dried quickly when I washed them in the hotel room. They will be my go-to pants for all RS tours going forward. I wore them when it was really hot in Croatia and also when we were at a cold mountain summit in Switzerland. Highly recommend.

Loved my lightweight Patagonia rainjacket. Also recommend the quick dry Columbia and Patagonia shirts. My Brooks sneakers doubled as the perfect rain shoe because I selected a style made of Gore-Tex fabric.

Posted by
57 posts

I did two Rick Steves trips this year—one in June and the other in August. For the first time, I took the Athleta Trekkie Hike Pant in three different colors and LOVED them. They were so light and comfy and dried quickly when I washed them in the hotel room. They will be my go-to pants for all RS tours going forward. I wore them when it was really hot in Croatia and also when we were at a cold mountain summit in Switzerland. Highly recommend.

Loved my lightweight Patagonia rainjacket. Also recommend the quick dry Columbia and Patagonia shirts. My Brooks sneakers doubled as the perfect rain shoe because I selected a style made of Gore-Tex fabric.

Posted by
13222 posts

My Patagonia Torrentshell rain jacket is waterproof, breatheable, and very lightweight. It can be rolled up and folded into its own hood for packing. It has kept me comfortable and dry in all-day hikes in the rain in Patagonia, New Zealand, the French Alps, and other places. It comes in many colors; mine is off-white like this:

https://www.backcountry.com/patagonia-torrentshell-jacket-womens

You can almost always find last season’s colors on sale for around $80, but not right now. Wait a bit and one will come up.

My sister bought one on sale in lime green some years back, on my recommendation. She lives in Los Angeles and didn’t have a rain jacket! It is an odd color but looks great in photographs.

The Marmot Precip is also nice; I don’t have the jacket but I do have the rain pants.

Posted by
5697 posts

We have rainjackets bought at Costco for $29.99 several years ago -- not in the stores now, but may come in sometime soon. Waterproof, light, roll up to be carried in a day bag (but not breathable.)
Since you will have a washer mid-trip with several days to hang-dry clothes in your apartment, you may not need to get sink-wash super-instant-dry travel pants. At home I have switched to cold water wash and hang dry for almost all my laundry (except towels and sheets) to help reduce fraying from the dryer, and things are usually dry within 1-1/2 days.
Also, if you are considering pants just because of colder weather, could you just add leggings underneath the skirts you have worn on other trips?

Posted by
68 posts

I absolutely love Columbia Mumbai Mover pants. They are quite comfortable and run either true to size or slightly large. I can sink wash them, hang them nearly dripping in the shower overnight, and they are dry by morning. Of course, this will depend on how humid your room is, but they do dry quickly. I find them at my local Columbia outlet store.

Happy travels!

Posted by
4784 posts

Beth,
My latest traveling pants are very comfortable, and they dry quickly too.

My favorite are Kornati-roll-up pants in black, although I've not worn them rolled up.
I also have these Taereen cargo pants, but it appears that they are no longer available.
I love the pockets on both of these pants, but I don't carry any valuables in them.

My rain jacket does not fold into a pocket but it's not bulky when rolled up. This jacket has traveled with me on every one of my trips since 2013.
It's the REI brand in black

Have a wonderful trip!

Posted by
2746 posts

I have travel pants by Prana. It's called the "Halle pant" which is a trouser cut - mine is gray and I wear it both hiking and general touring. It's not formal but it doesn't look so much like a hiking/travel pant that it's out of place in London. I think there's also a skinny leg version which is a little trendier. Washes and dries easily, comfortable, and multi-functional.

For hiking in Iceland (cold! wet! windy!) I wore leggings under Athleta Polartec pants (not the leggings, the pants). These are the most comfortable pants ever, but they look like sweatpants.

Posted by
1678 posts

I also have a Marmot PreCip jacket. The best part is that it has pit zippers - really helps with ventilation if it isn't cold but still wet (I wore it in Thailand and Vietnam and it was perfect). It doesn't fold into a pocket, but it does fold up pretty small. It comes in oodles of colors and usually you can find them on sale.

I also have several pairs of Kirkland (Costco brand) travel pants. I bought them on Amazon (some colors are $10). For me (a petite person) they're full length, but they may fit the bill for you as something between a capri and full length pants. They dry very quickly.

That said, if you like wearing skirts, take skirts. Pack tights if you think it's going to be cold for your taste (I'm from Oregon, my version of cold is probably different than Florida cold!)

Posted by
381 posts

I have three pair of the J Jill Wearever pants in black that are the only pants I take when I travel. They are great on the plane (knees don't pop out) and so comfortable with the elastic waist. I have washed them out and hung them over the shower rod and they are dry the next morning. I may throw in a pair of legging and these pants and I am good for a month. Depending on the tops and shoes you wear with them they can be dressy or casual.

Posted by
1795 posts

I do hang up most of my clothes to dry because I wear mostly cotton which shrinks in the dryer. But I do dry jeans which is why I would not take them on a trip like this.

I would prefer comfortable pants to wearing tights or leggings under a skirt.

I don’t think I want hiking pants unless they don’t look like hiking pants. I actually bought a pair of hiking pants yesterday that roll up to be capris. Ascend was the brand I think. They are nicer looking than I expected but would not want multiple pairs-I choose them for color and because they turn into capris rather than shorts.

Thanks so much for the help!

Beth

Posted by
23 posts

I loved my Eddie Bauer travel pants on our trip to Ireland, and for our next trip I plan to buy a couple more! They were comfortable & lightweight, and on warmer days I rolled them up and wore them as capris. I haven't had the chance to test out how quick they dry, however, as it didn't rain during our 8 days there. For a rain jacket I bought the 32 Degrees one from Costco. It doesn't pack into itself, but did come with a small pouch. Again, I didn't get to try it out in Ireland, but have worn it here at home a few times. It works great and the price was right.

Posted by
242 posts

Right now, at least at the Costco locations in Tucson, they are carrying ladie's Kirkland brand rain jackets for $29.99. The features are, according to the tag, "waterproof, seam-sealed, breathable, wind resistant, detachable hood, interior security pocket". I haven't had a chance to wear mine yet, but trust that it will do the job. It is a longer length (thigh to just above knee, depending on your height). I bought a larger size that I normally would wear, so that I could layer a jacket underneath if it is chilly out. It doesn't fold up into it own pocket, but it does fold up fairly small.

Posted by
1795 posts

Thanks for all the ideas. I am going to see what I can find of these that I can try on or return online for free. I seem to be between sizes these days!

Now today I was talking to my mom and she offered to lend me her gortex rain jacket. It fits perfect but is heavier than ideal, although the price is right! She said she doesn’t use it really since she moved to Florida from Midwest a couple years ago.

Beth

Posted by
11973 posts

You don't have to worry too much about your water proof jacket compressing. In England and Scotland, you never want it out of arms reach - even when it seems like great weather out (it will be raining at some point).

I use a Columbia jacket with no lining for my shell. It looks nice enough to wear anytime. It's good to stop rain or wind. I use layers under that to stay warm. My favorite warm layers are wool sweaters that aren't bulky and/or packable down jackets that can compress for packing.

My favorite pants are adidas golf pants, they're really light, dry fast and don't wrinkle but look like dress pants. I roll them up when I pack them and they compress to less than a couple of stacked commuter cups. I'll normally pack a gray pair and sometimes add a black pair. Khaki isn't a common pant color for men in Europe so I only wear those here.

Posted by
3259 posts

@ Cindy H Goretex is not overkill in hot climates. I use my beloved Goretex jacket for downpours at home during the summer.

Posted by
1179 posts

@Cala -
In super hot climates people use umbrellas.

Gortex is heavy and bulky for just strolling around town. It’s really designed for sweating activities.

Posted by
682 posts

Just take a light waterproof on the off chance you need it. Shorts or skirts will be fine in June, especially for hiking. The posters saying you need a raincoat every day made me laugh after the drought this summer!!!!!

Posted by
1179 posts

The posters saying you need a raincoat every day made me laugh after the drought this summer!!!!!

I’m sorry, but this makes zero sense to me.

A drought this summer has no effect on what happens next summer. Historically, Scotland tends to be wet so that’s what you should plan for.

A light packable raincoat is only a few ounces. You won’t need it until you do. And if you do need it you will most likely need it much.

You spend thousands to go overseas and then leave behind the equipment that will save your trip? Silly.

Posted by
1795 posts

I ended up buying a marmot precip jacket-last year's model so on sale for $70. It is very light and I think I can just stuff it in a backpack when I don't need it. I also found a pair of Northface pants at an outlet store for $25 that are also very light and don't look like hiking pants! I would not have thought to look there except for advice on this forum. I would have bought more but only pair in my size. So I bought a pair of JJill travel pants. One pair they make is heavier but I didn't buy that style. I live in south Florida and have worn them and have found them comfortable in 80 plus degree heat so I would think I could handle England in them.

Posted by
1179 posts

Bring a pair of leggings to wear under hem and you’re good to go for any weather!

Posted by
800 posts

My outdoorsy friend swears by Prana and Arc'trex. They fit well, are comfortable, pack small, and dry fast.

One thing I'll suggest that I have not seen mentioned, is NikWax. Get some and treat all your stuff before you go and you won't have anywhere near as much problem with wet. We do ours at least once a year, and here around Seattle it's needed.

Posted by
358 posts

Lots of good info here, as a salesman on the wholesale side of the equation from the outdoor industry, I'll weigh-in.

For most travelers looking for a waterproof jacket, a 2.5-layer constructed jacket is perfectly fine, avg price is $99. Inexpensive to make, inexpensive to buy, packable, wide range of colors and styles available...well suited for going abroad. The technology across all the brands are the same: a basic, liquid applied polyurethane that stretches, and tends to breathe better than Gore-Tex in conditions above freezing. Most popular styles by a wide margin:
Marmot PreCip
The North Face Venture
Patagonia Torentshell.

2-ply constructed garments are the most familiar; basically a waterproof jacket that has a hanging liner on the inside. Not terribly light or, packable, but a wide variety of textiles are used and you won't get that crunchy/crinkley sound or, sensation.

If you're insistent on a Gore-Tex shell, the technologies come in a several varieties, most useful and popular is PacLite, Active and ProShell. PacLite is Gore's competitive answer to the above mentioned company's 2.5L technologies: lightweight, packable & durable. Gore-Tex is a ePTFE laminate and will be heavier (we're talking grams here) compared those above BUT, will use nicer, more upscale textiles for the face fabric, so the hand is nicer and not as crunchy. The most popular of those styles:
Marmot Minimalist
Outdoor Research Foray
Arc'Teryx Beta SL
The North Face Dryzzle

Gore's Active laminate is mainly found in the running & backcountry activities, it's simply Gore-Tex laminate that's thinner than the standard Gore. Features like pockets are kept to a minimum as the intended use is for aerobic activities. I find Active suitable for travel however, most will not like it's spartan feature-set.

Pro Shell is 3-ply technology. It'll breathe and hold up, under all wet and cold conditions, mainly found in garments intended for mountaineering and skiing, durable but, packable. This technology is also prohibitively expensive, those garments using ProShell are using the top fabrics, the top zippers, very detailed in design piecing and overall a very well considered garment. Most people don't need a ProShell garment however, if you've got the funds and/or, want the best...

The lone exception to all of the above is in The North Face's Apex Flex-series of jackets. The secret hasn't been revealed but, there's much speculation to how it's constructed. Gore-Tex is inherently NOT stretchable, however, the fabric that is used, DOES stretch. The idea was to combine the soft feeling, stretchable properties of a soft-shell to the waterproof technology of Gore-Tex. Decades ago Arc'Teryx and Mountain Hardware tried to do this but, gave up after a few seasons of returns and warranty problems, TNF did it, and today the Apex Flex is one of the best selling rain jackets on the market. It is heavier than a 2.5L or, 3L, comes in around $225 and doesn't pack like a 2.5L BUT, admittedly is the most comfortable Gore-Tex jacket I've ever put-on and if you're wearing all the time, weight isn't an issue. No crunch, no crinkle, no feeling like a soaked potato chip, it's a very good option for an every-day rain jacket.

Posted by
21317 posts

I want to thank everyone who has contributed to this thread and will contribute in the future. Since I don't participate in active sports, I am clueless about outerwear, so it's stressful when I need to select something like a jacket to take on a jaunt to European rain country. It's great to have a place where I can read about others' experiences with specific products and specific technologies.

Posted by
9929 posts

Beth, I'm glad you found a good buy on the PreCip. When I was using one I stashed it in a gallon size ziplock in my purse. I could carry it around in my purse and pull it out if/when needed, then could fold up a wet PreCip into the ziplock and not have to fuss with it! I'd just shake it out when I got back to the hotel in the evening and it was good to go.

Posted by
1795 posts

Pam-I was thinking of a gallon zip lock bag for the jacket! Glad to know my idea actually works in practice.

And yes, there is a lot of really good information on this thread! Thanks to everyone!

Posted by
920 posts

I am kinda in the same fix of not having pants. I am 5’9” and hard to find pants long enough . Don’t like ordering online because I want to try in clothes. I love j Jill and wearever clothes. My clothes usually consist of their leggings, tops, and a dress or two, and Capri pants and a pair of jeans. I like wearing leggings and wear ever dress on my days of flying. They are more comfortable for me. The sink wash and dry in time for me. We travel to Europe...April, May or june

Posted by
5697 posts

Ziploc comes in a 2-gallon size -- great for down jacket!

Posted by
9929 posts

Laura B!! Well, I pride myself in being the ziplock queen but had not thought of a 2 gal for a puffy vest. I have mine rolled and in my day pack for day to day use. I don't like the stuff sack because it makes the fabric wrinkled but folding and squashing into a ziplock might work. I might be able to get it into a gallon one as well.

Beth, I use a LeSportsac Everyday Deluxe purse for my travel purse. It has 2 main zipper compartments and the gallon ziplock fits "pretty" well in one side. I also use a gallon ziplock for my iPad Mini to protect it from any damp weather on the days I put it in my purse.

Posted by
8003 posts

I take my Marmot Precip jacket on every trip I take. Easy to pack and works well. REI carries them.

Posted by
3474 posts

Beth, my favorite travel pants are Columbia "Just Right" straight leg. I have both the regular and Capri version. They are perfect for hiking or everyday touring. Quality light weight material. I wash them in the sink and hang dry overnight. If you get caught in the rain they dry quickly. Extremely comfortable to wear on a long flight. They come in several colors. I have them in black and gray. I am petite 2 and they have a short length as well. Columbia website or Amazon have frequent sales.

Posted by
94 posts

COSTCO online has the Marmot Precip rain jacket for women available now. Thanks to reviews, I bought a large even though I am a size 8. Fits great; I can layer a sweater or fleece under it.

Posted by
3474 posts

I just wanted to add another rain jacket brand that I recently purchased. It's the Royal Robbins Oakham waterproof, breathable, quick dry. It's wrinkle resistant, weighs 3.5 ounces, 4 way stretch, comfortable, adjustable hood, packs into it's own pocket, standard fit and comes in several colors. I had the opportunity to try it on at my local travel store in Edmonds, but they were out of my size and color that I preferred. I ordered it on Amazon. The pricing varied depending on color. On sale $48-$98. I will be taking it to Central Europe early Fall. Hope to try it out when our WA State weather improves. "Snowmageddon" is slowly melting.

Posted by
800 posts

Treat whatever jacket and pants you buy with NIKWAX. They make versions of waterproofer for all kinds of fabrics. I work on the docks in all kinds of weather and use this on all my work clothes as well as my outdoor stuff for recreation. It's very good at helping me keep dry. Jeans and canvas pants are no problem, wool one are fantastic. It even improves Gor-tex and like products.

Posted by
3474 posts

@KGC, thanks for the NICKWAX tip. I have read about it and look forward to using it on several items!

Posted by
639 posts

I'm late to this party. It seems the OP has long since resolved the issue that began this topic. But this seems to have become one of those helpful reference topics that lives on beyond the original situation, so I'll join in.

On October 22, slws2137 posted this:

Right now, at least at the Costco locations in Tucson, they are
carrying ladie's Kirkland brand rain jackets for $29.99. The features
are, according to the tag, "waterproof, seam-sealed, breathable, wind
resistant, detachable hood, interior security pocket". I haven't had a
chance to wear mine yet, but trust that it will do the job. It is a
longer length (thigh to just above knee, depending on your height). I
bought a larger size that I normally would wear, so that I could layer
a jacket underneath if it is chilly out. It doesn't fold up into it
own pocket, but it does fold up fairly small.

Well, snap. Probably that same week, I found that coat in my local Costco warehouse and bought it. I also went up a size to accommodate layers for chilly weather. Mine is a dark gray.

I took that coat to London (November 5 - 13). I was very pleased with it. The weather wasn't particularly chilly but several times when I was out and about it rained - sometimes a real downpour. Not necessarily all-day rain but definitely some serious "showers" of varying duration and intensity. That coat was seriously water-repellent! The hood was very useful. I don't think I unfurled an umbrella ever on that trip, but just put up the hood. The coat is constructed so that water didn't sneak in around the collar or seams. I didn't enjoy slogging through crowded London in those downpours, but at least I wasn't subjected to water running down my collar or soaking through my coat. And, the coat didn't even wrinkle. I just let it hang to dry in my hotel room, and it was good to go again.

The coat was also a good lightweight top layer when it wasn't raining. I also packed a very smush-able down jacket, which I wore a few times, but that $30.00 Costco coat was the star of my rainy city stay. It's not high-tech outdoor/hiking gear, and doesn't fold up into a pocket, but it was perfect for my trip. And very useful at home as well. I wish that I could get that kind of bang for my buck from all my purchases, lol!

Posted by
59 posts

I just purchased a Columbia Arcadia II as a new raincoat for an outer layer during our GAS tour. It fits well and is roomy enough for under layers, and they come in lots of pretty colors. It was on sale and around $50.00. I had also tried North Face but the boxier cut of Columbia lended better to the possibility of layering for me.

As to traveling pants I am going to us my Starfish straight legs, capris, and jeans, from LandsEnd, as well as a pair of Perfect Fit LLBeans. They all pack very well, are easy to wash, and should be cool enough. I can manage them even in Texas or California summers, so should be fine for our GAS tour in Sept.

Nancy

Posted by
160 posts

I have several pairs of JJill Wearever pants. I do NOT take them to Europe. They are very heavy which I realized after watching Sarah's (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHmwEzB-ZhU) packing video. Based on her recommendation I now take Eileen Fisher Stretch Crepe Slim Ankle Pants which are similar yet much lighter, they very fit well and I find the fabric does not pill as the Wearever fabric does. Yes, the Eileen Fisher pants are very expensive but I am so glad I splurged and got them.

I bring an LL Bean raincoat that stuffs into one of its pockets so that it becomes a pouch and I can keep it in my day bag. It was very handy on our South of Italy tour last May when we had a bit of rain, or I could layer it and use it as a windbreaker over my fleece when the temps were a little chillier than I expected. https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/115609?page=women-s-tek-o2-2-5l-element-jacket-colorblock in blue (on sale thru today for 25% off).

Posted by
66 posts

This is long past the OP's original questions, but this thread will be helpful to future travelers. I'm petite (five feet tall) and most "travel" brands don't offer petite sizes. No petite sizes in Marmot, North Face, Columbia (often mentioned in this thread).

I can't wear travel pants that are inches too long and coats with sleeves that end up way beyond the ends of my fingers. Why should I have to spend money and time to get clothing altered?

I depend on Eddie Bauer for sizing in pants and coats. Nearly all of their styles are available in petite sizing and EB's styles are perfect for at home and travel. Some of my favorite EB styles are the lightweight Travex line (specifically designed for travel with everything quick-dry for in-sink laundering), the Motion items (quick-dry, designed for exercise and yoga but great for travel), and other quick-dry styles. My favorite EB coats are the Lodge down parka (I own 3 colors) and the Girl on the Go rain trench (there are insulated and non-insulated styles). I avoid any coat or jacket styles with flaps secured with Velcro and opt for snaps instead.

ExOfficio makes traditional styles that are wonderful for travel, some items are reversible and some pants are available in petite. Mountain Hardwear makes nice tunics. My all-time favorite travel brand, Lucy, was folded into North Face a year ago and I nearly cried over that. I bought lots of Lucy clothing on clearance in the last months of its existence and will wear them for many years. One last recommendation is for Scottevest clothing, for men and for women. Again, no petite sizes but their travel vests are the best you can buy and they make q-zips, jackets, pants, and more for women.

Posted by
1179 posts

One last recommendation is for Scottevest clothing, for men and for women.

I absolutely hate, hate, hate Scottevest. It doesn’t fit my body, the weight hangs off my neck (and puts pressure on it) and the material collects lint.

So YMMV.

Posted by
358 posts

No petite sizes in Marmot, North Face, Columbia (often mentioned in this thread).

It is offered, principally in popular bottoms. Do not reference strictly off of those company's websites, as those are direct-to-consumer platforms which offer an assortment but, not a complete seasonal offering and doesn't compete with independant dealers. A dealer with a good customer service should be able to order petite sizes from those brands.

My all-time favorite travel brand, Lucy, was folded into North Face a year ago and I nearly cried over that. I bought lots of Lucy clothing on clearance in the last months of its existence and will wear them for many years.

Lucy's top-styles were retained by The North Face and use the same names that Lucy used. Pro tip, all the Lucy designers were retained and the new styles that were slatted to come out seasons later, are all a part of The North Face Run & Train group.

Posted by
1179 posts

No petite sizes in Marmot, North Face, Columbia (often mentioned in this thread).

Not to pile on but...

North Face Petites

You can’t trust distributors to carry the full line of clothing. You need to go to the manufacturers website to find extended sizes. That’s also true for plus sizes and tall.

Royal Robbins comes in 29, 32, 34 inch inseams.

Patagonia pants come in short

Why should I have to spend money and time to get clothing altered?

Because your travel clothing is expensive and you want to look good? One reason Europeans look better than US is that they get their clothes tailored. Very few of us have “off the rack” bodies.

I’m extremely curvy. I have to get both my shirts and my pants tailored to fit me.

One reason Europeans look better than US is that they get their
clothes tailored.

What? Which Europeans have you been talking to? The OP was talking about going to the U.K. - we dress as casually as Americans. Jeans, trainers, waterproof jackets.... I don’t know a single Brit who has their clothes tailored.

Posted by
952 posts

Clothing Arts’ “pick pocket proof” pants have come up in this and other threads. I bought a pair of their business model and was hoping the matching shorts would arrive in time for Scotland next week. I wore the gray nylon pants for a test run and discovered several issues: they weren’t gray at all, more of an olive drab; the fabric wouldn’t hold a press, silly in business attire; the pockets were not large enough to hold many of todays’s must-haves like passport/document cases and large modern phones; and, some of the pockets’ security features require two hands to operate. I had to contact the company to arrange a return and to cancel the shorts. I really wanted those pants to work and it was an expensive bummer for me because of their consumer-aggressive return policies. Read the fine print VERY carefully before you remove the tags from your Clothing Arts products.

Posted by
94 posts

I bought the Clothing Arts pick pocket pants due to the reviews on these forums. Waited four months for delivery. They were too big, but even if they had fit, I wouldn’t have liked them. The pockets - even empty - made them heavy. I can’t imagine how uncomfortable they would be once filled. They are cut too slim in the thigh to be comfortable (and I am a size 8). Luckily, I had not cut off the tags, but it has been weeks since the return and still no credit. My email to them has gone unanswered.

I am going back to my usual travel clothes - those I find comfortable at home!

Posted by
21317 posts

I took the advice of several in this thread and shopped around to find the PrAna pants on sale. I haven't taken them to Europe yet but have tried them out while walking around here at home They seem to be quite comfortable. I think they will be helpful in the potentially rainy environments of Spain in April and Scotland in mid-summer, though I realize they are not waterproof.

It only belatedly occurred to me that the PrAna pants are low-cut and my long johns (Scotland!) come all the way to the waist. That's not necessarily a great look. I'll have to be careful to select tops that will conceal the problem area.