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Mountain Warehouse outdoor clothing--any good?

Does anybody have any outerwear from Mountain Wearhouse, which seems to be a direct-to-consumer outdoor apparel and gear company.

How are their products? Their clothing is cheaper than that sold at REI.

Posted by
836 posts

Hello Aimee, thank you for your detailed answer.

I did not know that those details matter. Now I do!

If I could pick your brain, what are some better outdoor apparel brands?

Posted by
5769 posts

Yes, your use will determine whether it is a good value.

Related to the topic of this forum, outdoor gear is usually designed light, high performance, and dries quickly after washing, all good.

If your doing some hiking and outdoor activities, this type of clothing can be a good option. I have some pants from other lines I pack, though they look like black or brown dress/casual pants. I also have some outdoor shirts that look more like a casual or dress shirt.

I do tend to stay away from anything looking too "outdoorsy" for daily travel. I know the accepted mantra here is wear what you like, but after hearing my European colleagues go on about all the tourists walking around Rome (or Paris or London) looking like they are on safari, sometimes in matching outfits, I am a bit sensitive about my apparel.

Posted by
836 posts

Thank you again. Can't agree more with Marmot and ExOfficio--now owned by the same owner. They used to be good, but quality has really gone down the drain.

What do you think of some European brands such as Regatta?

Posted by
836 posts

About my use--I don't camp or backpack. The most I do is easy to moderate day hikes. I also need something that travels and washes well.

My most recent "outdoor" experience was light hiking in the Austrian and Italian Alps. In the future (whenever Covid is less of a threat), I plan to do day hikes about a dozen times per year. My spouse and I aren't spring chickens anymore.

I do agree with Paul that many tourists in Europe look like they are from the safari. So, I don't mind paying a bit more for functionality and (reasonable) looks. I need something that is lightweight, almost waterproof and windproof, yet breathable (if possible). It must be machine washable.

Posted by
2103 posts

Regatta is a UK brand – more of an entry-level brand. It’s not really high-end performance but will do a job as long as you're not in demanding conditions.

The only item I bought from Mountain Wearhouse I gave away as it performed poorly -the jacket wasn’t very breathable so became very sweaty

Personally, I like Montane and Paramo for walking in the UK.

It comes down to budget and what you're going to use it for. Occasional outdoor use or something that is going to perform very well when you need it most.

Posted by
890 posts

Hi Barkinpark -

I have some Mountain Warehouse kit, and come to that, some Regatta. It all boils down to what you want to use it for and there is much truth in the statement that “you gets what you pays for”. That said, Regatta (and Craghoppers who I think maybe linked as companies) do cater for those of us who suffer from a shortness of leg - I have several pairs of trousers from them as many other manufacturers seem to stereotype male hikers as six foot plus and nine stone wet through, as opposed to those of us of, shall we say, a squatter disposition.

Most of the time though when going on ‘serious’ hikes, like Aimee, I favour more dependable, better quality, and more expensive kit. We are fans of Paramo, Montane, Rab, Osprey, Lowe Alpine, etc., etc. and we try never to skimp on boots and socks. Patagonia I find incredibly expensive (maybe that’s the U.K. only) and I have heard complaints about it’s durability. My own one base layer half zip I’ve worn consistently and it’s still going strong.

So while you will find me in the hills sporting reliable, preferably ‘bomb proof’, high end of the price scale, kit you’ll also find me wandering about in Regatta, usually when travelling or walking locally and running in a Mountain Warehouse reflective top. It all depends what you want it to do and to how much you want to pay for it in the end. There’s a definite link between price and performance I find.

Ianpark (no relation I assume)

Posted by
5475 posts

I have only bought a couple of items from Mountain Warehouse (is this different to the Mountain Wearhouse that previous posters have mentioned?) and it’s been ok, but as it’s cheaper, it hasn’t lasted as long as other more expensive brands that I have.

My default daily waterproof is a Regatta or a Lowe Alpine. They are fine but I wouldn’t use the Regatta for serious hill walking in inclement weather. I have a padded down Musto jacket for walking when it’s cold, which is toasty. Brilliant jacket.

I struggle to find ladies walking trousers that fit me - my Paramo trousers are ok but short in the crotch and Craghoppers are far too big in the waist compared to the hips.

Posted by
836 posts

I do see some foreign brands sold at REI and Sierra Trading Post.

Buying from STP is always tricky, as their return policy is strict.

I was in the Italian Alps looking for outdoor apparel. The prices shocked me. I am sure if I was just looking at the wrong places. The cheapest shorts I found cost 60 euros.

Posted by
12939 posts

I thought Mountain Warehouse was a UK store and brand? One of their stores in Whitby saved me from freezing when we were there at the end of April and it was seriously cold, in a way I was not prepared for. We were there to hike and be outside, but I did not have enough warm gear, so we stopped in there and I found a kid’s size fleece that fit me well for £12, and a warm pair of gloves. Served the purpose for our hike to Robin Hood Bay in sleet and wind, but they are not what I would call high quality.

I really like Patagonia for their ethical practices and commitment to sustainability, as well as their quality, but I only buy it on sale, or with the REI 20% discount that they offer from time to time. I also like Arc’terxy, but I only buy it for my son, who is a hard-core skier and rugged outdoorsman/endurance athlete. He needs quality like that when he is out on a bikepacking adventure in the Colorado Rockies, and a late snowstorm hits. My outdoor adventures are much less demanding, and I can get by with my Patagonia Torrentshell rain jacket.

But if the OP is just looking for clothing and rain gear for moderate dayhikes and travel wear, and doesn’t want it to look like safari clothing, there are lots of less expensive options.

Posted by
2530 posts

we have a lot of mountain warehouse places in the UK in fact one less than a mile from my house, bought a lot of stuff from them over the years and it is decent stuff for the price, not high end gear but decent enogh quality for most outdoor use.I recently bouight 3 pairs of walking shoes form them as they were in a clearance sale and sell for around 20% of standard retail price, and as I wear walking shoes as day to day footwear they were a real bargain for me. One thing I have found is their sizes of mainly shirts.t-shirts etc vary, some seem really large for the size some normal. They often have 2for 1 deals.I have had a few of their rucksacks/ day packs and they have been very good and lasted well, other accessories like hats ,socks etc have been n not bad and good value for money. here in the UK they used to do a lot of camping gear but that seems to be very limited now.
Someone mentioned Regatta and I would say mountain ware house are of a similar quality and price to this ,Regatta also own the Craghopper brand and I really like their fleeces and jackets but again not high end stuff but great for country walking and general outdoor use, they have an outlet shop not far from me and i can pick up a few bargains there every now and then,. Trespass is another similar brand that i have several products from.
From this you can gather I wear clothes from outdoor shops the majority of the time.

Posted by
5769 posts

If this forum had a wiki-bot, it would automatically interject a comment: Mountain Warehouse is a British outdoor retailer selling equipment for hiking, camping, skiing, cycling, running and fitness. Founded in 1997 by Mark Neale; Mountain Warehouse has grown from a single outlet store to over 330 stores in the UK, Europe, New Zealand and North America

Posted by
890 posts

Aimee is correct, Mountain Hardware is a separate company. I have some gloves and a couple of jackets made by them. Their Chockstone soft shell jacket (apparently no longer made, wouldn’t you know?) I have worn to near extinction and for all manner of purposes.

Ian

Posted by
2183 posts

I find Mountain Warehouse fine for moisture wicking t shirts and other light accessories, but was not impressed for anything that will be used heavily such as shoes and warm jackets. My outdoor store of choice is Eddie Bauer.

Posted by
1837 posts

Whenever the word 'bombproof' and ethical production comes up it's another chance for me to mention JandD, a small outdoor gear company that kind of focuses on bicycle camping but has a broad range of gear, all of which will make it through the zombie apocalypse without so much as a wrinkle. It's pricey because it's like haute couture - basically handmade from amazing materials, so I can only get the stuff that comes up for sales. For minimalists, you have to weigh the super sturdy materials against your likely needs - if you really won't need to use a backpack strap as an improvised towline for a barge, then maybe you can get by with lighter goods.
https://www.jandd.com/travel.asp

Posted by
785 posts

My 40 years of ultralight backpacking and bicycle touring have led to make these observations:
1. Less gear -- or less mass -- does not equal reduced comfort, warmth, or security.
2. Bombproof gear is completely unnecessary for travel unless, of course, your life actually depends on your equipment's integrity. If you'e climbing Everest, yes, you'd want superior gear.
3. Capitalism is a wonderful thing, don't you think? And there is no question the American public will buy just about anything. Therefore, I can state with confidence there is no direct correlation between the price of an object and its characteristics of performance, durability, or eco-friendliness.
4. Shopping for price is only useful AFTER you have done your research and decided on a specific product.
5. When carrying your own stuff, as we do on RS tours, total mass is crucial -- more important than total volume. The principles of packing lightly should at least be considered.
6. For in-depth and competent advice on sporting goods and other outdoor equipment that is not readily adapted to travel, like, say, mountain bicycle shoes and ski goggles, go to sites that specialize in such gear. You can get good advice here from experienced and knowledgable folks but we tend to be generalists.

Posted by
836 posts

I am so touched by all your detailed and enthusiastic replies.

What do you think of mainstream brands such as Eddie Bauer and LL Bean? Their clothes probably can't survive the harshest outdoor conditions, but seem to be acceptable for general uses.

Posted by
4585 posts

I have a bundle of Mountain Warehouse wicking tees that I use as t-shirts, base layers as I heat up quite quickly. They're a 'techinical make' and have lasted a number of years despite being quite cheap to purchase. I also have a pair of practical walking trousers that are water resistant enough for a quick dog walk. I wouldn't invest in anything more substantial like a jacket or shoes/boots.

The general consesnus is that you get what you pay for. My favourite boots are my Hoka boots, by far the most comfortable and well gripped boots I've ever worn and also my Altberg boots, expensive but well made in Yorkshore for centuries and from a single piece of leather are extremely waterproof.

Rab clothing is exceptional albeit expensive however it really does perform well in extreme circumstances. For waterproof trousers I've found DLX to be the best, lightest and windproof. Lightweight but breatheable jackets are a cross between Rohan and North Face. Marmot make some good technical fleeces, even some that have a light water resistant coating on.

I've tried Regatta, didn't like them. I found them ill fitting and made of cheap material and really not up to the job.

Posted by
82 posts

My one experience with Mountain Warehouse was not good. Several items in the order did not fit and I returned them. It took awhile to process the return and when they did, they refunded only two of the three items I returned. When I called about the discrepancy the “customer service” rep I spoke with was incredibly rude and basically called me a liar. Had to resolve the issue through my credit card company.

Posted by
2183 posts

What do you think of mainstream brands such as Eddie Bauer and LL
Bean? Their clothes probably can't survive the harshest outdoor
conditions, but seem to be acceptable for general uses.

I've got well used Eddie Bauer rain jacket, pants and a couple of fleece sweaters and they've held up incredibly well. Just bought a new down winter jacket and so far so good. My favourite product from them is the First Ascent pants https://www.eddiebauer.ca/p/12951063/men-s-guide-pro-pants?sp=1&is_psugg=true&_br_psugg_q=first%2Bascent%2Bpants, these are my go-to travel pants because of the number of pockets, durability and ease to pack without wrinkles. They come in men's and women's. I jokingly now call them part of my retirement uniform.

Posted by
758 posts

We were in Edinburgh, Scotland 5 years ago and I thought I had packed warm enough clothing for July. Wrong. Thankfully a Mountain Warehouse on Princes street was having an end of season sale and I bought a 1/4 zip fleece pullover. I still like wearing it and it keeps me very warm.

As others have mentioned, they have stores all over the UK. Not sure I'd bother ordering from them on this end but would visit over there if I needed something.

Posted by
569 posts

We just returned the other day from Iceland. I bought snow boots from Mountain Warehouse for this trip. We also brought along our trusty Lowa Renegade hiking boots. The two pair were perfect for our needs on this trip.

The MW boots were this style. They fit great with ample room in the toe box for heavier winter socks. The laces stayed tied and the boots were tall enough to keep the snow out. Best of all they were completely waterproof and kept my feet warm. I was quite impressed with them, and we do a lot of outdoor activities and do not tend to go for the cheap stuff, but these were great!

https://www.mountainwarehouse.com/ohio-womens-snow-boots-p13202.aspx/jet%20black/

Posted by
3140 posts

My husband , who occasionally does some serious hiking, uses Arcteryx and Patagonia.

My more modest needs and budget lean heavily to LL Bean. My favorite jacket, which I don't take on trips because I don't want to risk losing it, is an LL Bean Goretex jacket that is at least 20 years old. My inlaws gave it to me for Christmas at a time when I felt I could not pay that much for a jacket. I am currently wearing my 2nd pair of LL Bean Goretex hiking boots-the previous pair wore out. I bought some Eddie Bauer travel pants in Dec 2021 and like them so much that I tried to buy more but they were out of my size.

Posted by
836 posts

Just want to share this--I bought a waterproof, windproof the North Face jacket for less than $70. It's discontinued and the sleeves are kinda long. Yet, for this price, I am not complaining. The vendor is Sunny Sports. I found it from a Google search.