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Fanny pack with inner lining that does't disintegrate (too soon)

I replaced a fanny pack of yesterdecade with one of a reasonable brand name at the time ("lowe alpine"). The inner liner provides water resistance, but has begun to disintegrate, leaving find sticky debris over everything placed into it, including sheaths of paper. The idea that the life of the fanny pack is limited by the relatively short life of the unstable lining is repugnant. Is there a brand/model that is known not to have this problem. Also useful (though not nearly as much as the above), are there brands that have established a track record of making fanny packs with bum liners that last only a few years?

Posted by
4654 posts

are there brands that have established a track record of making fanny packs with bum liners that last only a few years?

It does tickle me when Americans use the phrase 'fanny pack', this sentence takes it to another level!

Posted by
3789 posts

Plastics and waterproofing breakdown with age and friction. Get one without a lining or at least a fabric lining. Brand may be less important that actual model. Also consider that this is a throw away society where pricepoint matters and even reputable companies may cut corners leaving you with a poor product.

Posted by
6868 posts

I think your fanny pack is trying to tell you something (as in... "don't replace me with another fanny pack"). Why not a crossbody bag? Men wear them too, and they look much better than fanny packs.

Posted by
1649 posts

I agree with Agnes. Unless you are an avid runner, then that waist pack would be more acceptable.

It has been stressed over and over that carrying extra cash credit card and possibly your passport goes in the money belt under your clothing. Some people can't use a money belt for different reasons. It is good when transporting between cities.

As someone mentioned above what they use. How about some type of streamlined small bag designed with a masculine look - a bag designed to put an iPad in - meaning it's flat, crossbody and you can hold your documents and day money and possibly a water bottle.

Another style I saw a lot around Italy was a messenger style bag - cross body and they come in different sizes.

if you are still wanting to use the waist pack then check out sporting goods stores, stores geared for the jogger or runner or sports athlete.

you might be able to find a good quality one at TJ Maxx.

Posted by
838 posts

Call it whatever you want.
Wear it whenever and however you want.
Put anything in it you wish.
Fashion is a silly construct.
Be brave and proud of your uniqueness.
Do not be a sheep.

You might be happier in the long run with a nice leather or heavy duty nylon shoulder bag (with a secure closure). Waist packs and fanny packs are getting difficult to find in the States. The hipsters are asking for sling packs and cross body thingies.

Patagonia and Osprey both make a large selection of excellent (and expensive) products. Look at their bags and gear lists for items under 20L.

Tom Bihn makes the Cafe and Ristretto series of shoulder bags.

Posted by
12875 posts

In 2001 I had with me on the trip a brand new fanny pack/waist belt made by Eagle Creek. It had an inner lining but not one that could be zipped up. Over the years on the various trips, domestic and in Europe, the wear and tear began to show plus one of the zippers "broke"...it wasn't working as it was suppose to.

Last year I bought a new fanny pack also made by Eagle Creek. High time to replace that old ragged one. Obviously, that old style from 2001 was no longer available from Eagle Creek. What is different is that this new style Eagle Creek has an inner lining made more with a zipper...very handy and convenient.

No need to use binder clips anymore.

Posted by
1649 posts

call it whatever you want

If he goes to Britain and refers to it as a "fanny pack," a good chance he will offend people.

Posted by
2716 posts

All Lowe Alpine™ products come with a guarantee that covers the original owner, with proof of purchase, for the usable lifetime of the product. We are aware that from time to time faults can appear; should a product fail due to defects in workmanship and/or materials, we will repair the item free of charge or replace at our discretion.

Return it!

Posted by
3491 posts

The fanny pack seems to be making a return to stylish. There is even a Gucci branded one you can pick up for the totally reasonable price of $750.00!

Sorry I can't recommend one. I will never wear one, never have worn one. Just don't see the point.

I use a small day pack, got right here from the RS store, to carry my daily needs while I am on a tour. Works fine. Has no negative issues like that described.

Posted by
2458 posts

My SIL used one last summer in Croatia. He wore it around his waist and crossbody wise. Search the internet, there are so many brands. I got mine from Vera Bradley, Coach, Lands End, and Perlina. I even use mine when i go to museums here at home. Tom Bihn has one i was looking at, i think theirs is unisex.

Posted by
4249 posts

I'm not saying I'm a huge fan, but I do like a fanny pack for hiking, and they are back in style(per my daughter my fashion consultant). I also would advocate buying/doing whatever works best for you. With a fanny pack, I am able to quickly dig out a map, or camera battery, etc., while I walk. There should be a whole lot out there to consider. I'd see what's available from REI, LLBean or similar.

Posted by
4654 posts

If he goes to Britain and refers to it as a "fanny pack," a good chance he will offend people.

He won't offend many but if I went to John Lewis and asked for a fanny pack with a bum liner I might be politely told to search online.

Posted by
9674 posts

Like Jules M I do use a waist pack for hiking or walking the trails near my home. I have one from WalMart that is unlined and has lasted maybe 5 or 6 years? I wanted one with space for 2 bottles so I could use one for a water bottle and have my bear spray easily accessible in the right one.

My brother has a larger one from Mountain Smith but it's larger and just doesn't fit my old pudgy body very well.

Posted by
1649 posts

Lol, jc. I read somewhere the term fanny in the British sense means something entirely different.

Posted by
8592 posts

Just use a large ziplock bag for the waterproofing function.

Posted by
10 posts

@JC: Yeah, I read about the international interpretations of the phrase "fanny pack". Glad to be of entertainment value. I suppose that the situation is compounded by referring to "bum liner" rather than a "less than ideal liner". Though to be fair, it's quite possible that the liner is OK, and that it's just too old. I don't really remember when I got the fanny pack. Also, I typically wear it on the front rather than behind, either at waist level or diagonally across the front chest. It's just that so many people on my side of the pond know of this as a fanny pack.

@Maria: Yes, you're right. It's just a pity that the liner is the weak link in the chain, meaning that the product becomes unusable long before the shell material has even started to show signs of wear. In my case, it's aging liner rather than friction. And yes, I've run too much into the attitude today that it's not worth making lasting things, and that is literally going to be the death of many of us, and/or our children. I'm not sure how easy it is to find a non-lined fanny pack, but will certainly keep it in mind. My options may be even more limited than I thought. I'm just now remembering how much fit, size, and design mattered when I last hunted for a fanny pack many years ago, so online shopping may not cut it. I may be limited to what I can find in brick & mortar stores.

@Travel Man: Google image search doesn't pull anything up for [man-bag "Jack Wolfson"], but man-bag alone shows that it is like a single-shoulder slung side bag. This is larger than what I seek. I typically only use the fanny pack when going to a foreign city and especially air travelling. The big items like laptops & power supplies, portfolio binder/folder, binders, books, etc. go into a knapsack. The front pouch is for things I need to access immediately without unslinging anything: passport, boarding pass, other travel papers (folded). To avoid having to get my big bag when on a plane, I also use the fanny pack for vitamins, earbuds, earplugs, eye shades, etc. I actually have variations of man bags, but don't use them, because I know that I will need the backpack and the fanny pack, so the man bag becomes another redundant item to bring (for my travel habits). I can see a man bag becoming more useful for the road if I leave much of what I lug around at the hotel. For a number of reasons, however, I usually carry most if not all my electronics and documents with me. This means that I burn a lot of carlories, and it is too much for a man bag.

@Agnes: I usually find a bigger fanny pack and switch beween wearing it at waist level, at the front, and diagonally acroos the front of the torso. I also describe to Travel Man above my travel habits, which usually requires a full backpack, making a bonafied full crossbody bag unsuitable. The fanny pack serves as a smaller crossbody bag for small things that need immediate access without unslnging anything.

Posted by
10 posts

@Girasole: It seems to me that a waist pack is a bigger version of a fanny pack. I have a detachable one on my Mountain Equipment Co-op backpack, and it stays there as an external pouch. I describe to Travel Man above my "usage case", which often necessitates a backpack with a large fanny pack, sometines worn diagonally across the front of the torso. I never wear the fanny pack behind; it's always in front, with the buckle behind. So if I have the backpack, as is often the case, it presses the bucke into the spine. So I wear it diagonally across the front of the torso after putting on the backpack. I can rummage through without unslinging anything, and if I really need to rummage hard, it's very quick to unsling, and it's small enough that it doesn't need to be put down on anything.

@bogiesan: Yes, they are fanny packs did fall out of fashion, and off the shelves, but I'm glad to hear that they're coming back. I appreciate the suggested brand names (Patagonia, Osprey, Tom Bihn, Restretto), but each brand probably makes a range of models and qualities. So I'm trying to gather more specific information, such as users' specific experience with a specific model, especially regarding the longevity of the liner.

@Fred: Interesting. A removable liner. That probably means that the liner can be replaced. Is yours one of the two at http://www.eaglecreek.com/shop/waist-packs? Stores in Ottawa (where I am) carry this brand, though I'd have to visit to see if they carry the "waist packs".

@Philip: I no longer have the paperwork, so I can't return it.

@Mark: $750/fanny pack is probably more than I as considering.

@Pam: An unlined fanny pack from Walmart. That is indeed something worth checking out. Thanks!

@joe32F: Yes, I could probably ziplock things if I am using an unlined fanny pack, which would definitely solve the problem of a disintegrating lining. It would certainly detract from the quick convenience of a front worn fanny pack. If I'm out in the rain, however, I can just chuck the fanny pack into the backpack.

@GeneralAudience: I'm beginning to think that the dichotomy between fanny packs and shoulder slung body/man bags is unnecessary. This is a simple matter of design configuration, and I often wear the fanny pack as a crossbody bag anyway. It's the lining that's at issue, and it's lifetime is not changed by whether the product it lines is configured or worn at waist level, across the body, or single-should-slung to the side. Regardless of the configuration, I'd still be looking for personal anecdotes as to the longevity of the lining. Not so much it's durability, as I will use it only occassionally, but whether it lasts a long time before disintegrating. Even though I will often wear it diagonally across the torso, I'm not looking for a full cross-body bag because I often carry a full backpack. The fanny pack is for things that I need to access immediately without unslinging anything, and have a smaller one helps me find the essentials more quickly than if they where combined with less essential things in a bigger bag. There are good brand names out there, but each is probably associated with a line of products of varying quality; hence, I'm trying focus on gathering anecdotes of specific models that users have personally found to have long lasting liners. Thanks.

Posted by
6868 posts

I just want to say I am totally impressed by how the OP (original poster) replied to each individual comment - and with such precision and thoroughness. It's a rare sight to see on this forum.

Best of luck on making your final selection!

Posted by
1649 posts

Wow! I agree Agnes. A good read. Nicely done explanations about or reasons why suggestions would or would not work in terms of what Andy is looking for.

Good luck in finding your pack. Perhaps, consider posting a review here afterwards letting others know how it worked for you.

Happy travels!

Posted by
3428 posts

If you are willing to put a bit of money into it, I'd look at Tumi. They have 'waist pouches' and slings and crossbody bags. Hubby and I have recently fallen in love with almost all things Tumi. The quality is there and we believe it worth the price. Their products are generally well designed and made of durable, lightweight materials.

Posted by
8100 posts

Why wear a backpack when you could just put everything in a messenger bag? With a backpack, you have to take it off every single time you want something. Sitting on a train is uncomfortable, you have to find a place for it when you sit in a cafe, you have to lock it up in museums, you have to worry about storing anything valuable in it.

Please stop calling it a fanny-pack. People in the UK, Australia think you are basically calling it a vagina pack. Rather rude don't you think?

Posted by
838 posts

Anecdotes are not data. You can research individual products at the mfr’s websites and then study the user reviews carefully. You will user commentary on the sites and on retail sales outlets. For instance, REI’s user reviews are usually reliable. Reviews from TJ Max, not so much. But those user commentaries rarely include or extend to long-term evaluations over, say, two to ten years.

My personal experience is that Osprey, Tom Bihn, Mountainsmit, and Patagonia all make superb products, stuff you would be very happy with, items that will likely outlast your desire and ability to travel. Outdoor Research, Lowe, REI, North Face, Marmot, Timbuk2, Chrome, and a dozen other mfrs all make great fanny packs, slings, man purses, and lumbar packs, too.

Posted by
3789 posts

Andy, do you know anyone who sews? If so, ask them to make a fabric lining for the pack you have now if it ticks all the boxes except current inner surface. Or, in the spirit of reducing waste, hire a seamstress to do it. Only worth it if the sticky part doesn't transfer through fabric.
See if GooGone removes the stickiness.

Posted by
4249 posts

There is a difference between a fanny pack (or waist pack or whatever you want to call it) and a back pack and a messenger bag.What the OP is looking for is something that would go around his waist that can be accessed as he walks. I use something similar for biking or hiking and sometimes walking around a city. It is super easy to reach in to grab a map,mint, chapstick, bus fare, etc., and you can sit down without removing it. Whatever works for the individual or application is best.

Posted by
12875 posts

@ andy...The old 2001 Eagle Creek waist belt/fanny pack did not have a removable liner. I didn't mean that. Inside it had a liner separating most of the inside, sort of dividing the inside in two. There was no zipper. I kept Euro bills behind the liner hidden in a plastic envelope sandwiched by two train ticket receipts, ie, 100 to 300 Euro in 20s and 50s. The plastic envelope containing this cash was fastened to the liner by two binder clips, one and each end...an extra layer of defense.

This new Eagle Creek waist belt does come with a zippered pocket inside. The zipper ends on the right side when zipped all the way. I arrange the entire waist belt outside zippers to be closed all the way to the left, ie, both ending in opposite directions of each other...another layer of defense.

All in all, it's a trade-off. Some features I liked better in the old one, just as some features I prefer in the new one. Both are Eagle creek products that fits what I want in terms of travel style.

Based on the pictures, the one I have now looks like "pack S" It certain;y did NOT cost $39. ...closer to $20. Notice the picture shows in both examples the 2 zippers ending together in dead center. . I never do that, ie, having zippers together (to close) meeting half way in between,.

Posted by
1277 posts

Ms Jo, I don't think the intention is to be rude, it's a regional language issue. Ok , this would be a British argument, but on this side of the pond "boot" is not a car trunk, never a pharmacy, but is always footwear. We are slow to relinquish phrasing. I had a lovely conversation this
weekend with a high school
friend who I have always known as
Mike, he now prefers Michael, but graciously
ignores my fumbling.

It's a pretty benign word here. In fact.

I could round up half a dozen octogenarians named Frances who

would say to you... "oh, Honey. Please call me Fanny". We have been duped
by our sweet aunts and neighbors
and the candy they keep in cut glass

dishes waiting for us to stop by.

OP Andy, yes, a good seamstress could help resurrect yr bag. Or, ask
yr aunt Francis

Posted by
10 posts

@Agnes & @Girasole: Thanks! If I don't document my response to individuals, I won't know that I considered each response. Then people will rightfully feel that they wasted their time, and not respond anymore. Just like in real-life. :)

I can't say that I review all thoughts put forth, because they are highly divergent. But if I end up following through with a particular solution, I'll say why.

@Toni: Thanks for the info, Toni. Tumi has a single waist pouch, serving also as a cross-body bag: http://ca.tumi.com/p/daniel-utility-pouch-01173507521. Most waist pouches of olde were designed so that the attachment to the belt fanned out to cover the entire height of the pouch. In contrast, with the single attachment point for the Tumi pouch, I (speculatively) expect it to flap and bounce around. I think that it would do better as a cross-body bag rather than serving also as a waist pouch, especially because of its large size.

AFTERNOTE: avirosemail suggested Jandd waist pouches, which have a similar design (http://www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FMF), so I'm not entirely certain about my speculations about the bag bouncing around. What I meant by fanned out attachment for stability is illustrated by their other waist pouch (http://www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FMF2).

Having said that, Tumi is carried by a local shop that carries a lot more variety: http://www.capitalcityluggage.com/waist-bag. They may also be able to contribute knowledge as to a pouch that is known not to scrimp on the quality of the lining. Or even a maker (I know that this goes against what I've been saying about zeroing in on a specific model, but I wouldn't want to totally exclude a maker's reputation).

We also have a Tumi in our city centre, if I want to follow up with them more about other options. Good excuse to go into town.

@Ms. Jo: Google images indicates that a messenger bag is essentially a side bag. I carry too much in my back pack for a side bag, and over time, the assymmetric weighting would do a number on the spine. I have sometimes taken a side bag with my backpack, but more often than not, I find it excessive. About the term "fanny pack", we have people on our side of the pond with the name "Fannie". I think it's better to accept that different terms are used in different places with different meanings rather than censor such terms.

Posted by
10 posts

@bogiesan: Product "data" per se (depending on what is meant) doesn't always address my points of interest. I find anecdotes to be as good as reviews, and more targeted if they respond to a specific question. I trust both much more than manufacturer information, and find them to be at least as relevant. For me, the anecdotes in response to a specific question serves as starting point. I then find out more about the suggested products, including reviews and seller information, both at seller sites and 3rd party or intermediary sites, e.g., amazon. Granted, you have to be watchful of the pattern of reviews to recognize likely fakes. I acknowledge that not all reviews deal with longevity, but one finds out what one can. Thanks for your suggested list of brand names.

@Maria: I did momentarily ponder whether I could remove the inner lining, but it isn't really a separate layer of fabric. It's like a rubberized coating, meant to be bonded to the vinyl shell. Anything strong enough to dissolve that would likely also put the shell at risk. Sewing a separate layer as an liner and hoping that it traps the orignal disintegrating bits of original coating is going too far to save the product. I'd rather minimize impact on the environment by sticking to products that last.

@jules m: You described what I'm seeking quite well. In addition, I also use the waist pouch as a (small) cross-body pouch.

@Fred: I think I'd find a divider useful. The cost isn't my real issue, because for the number of years that I want to go without hunting down a replacement, the cost per year is neglegible. If your previous Eagle Creek lasted almost 20 years, then the hope is that they still maintain the same philosophy of designing for longevity these days. When I put it this way, it seems almost futile to ask for anecdotes. Any anecdotes on a truly long lasting product will be upward of a decade old, and whether or not the maker maintains such a design philosophy today is anyone's guess...

@doric8: Thanks for explaining the regional terminology. I've taken to using the term "waist pouch" just to be safe. In keeping with the intention to avoid offense. As for an internally sewn lining, I'm having some trouble coming to terms with adding material to the inside just to contain the flakes of a native internal coating (which is probably how I should have more accurately described it). Being a thin vinyl shell, I'm also afraid that sewing might compromise the surface, e.g., in terms of strength and/or water resistance.

@avirosemail: Thanks for pointing out Jannd (they refer to their own name with a lower-case "d'). It certianly looks like a cadillac brand in terms of toughness. The lining is described in terms of its water repellancy, and I am assuming that material longevity (in terms of aging rather than resistance to abrasion) is correlated. I'll keep it on my radar, maybe see if a local company carries it. I would definitely be looking at the "Micro Fanny Pack" or "Micro Fanny II". The next bigger one is called "Extra Small Fanny Pack", but it's as big as the detachable day-trip pouch on the back of my Mountain Equipment Co-op back pack.

Posted by
1277 posts

Thanks for your graciousness. Andy.
I have owned many purses that have a lining similar to what you described

And not to continue to flog a dead horse. But Also many of us stateside got our college loans thru a federal program called Fannie May

Posted by
3789 posts

@andymhancock it would appear we are from the same city. If it was a leather bag I would have offered to assess sewing in a new lining, but vinyl itself has a shelf life so may been it's on way out.
Have you considered physically checking out Bushtakah, MEC or Trailhead? Maybe something sport designed may jump out at you....though I admit Capital city has a selection.

Posted by
10 posts

@doric8: I think Maria touched on the key point in my previous post -- that the shell is just a plastic fabric. It's not as sturdy as a purse, and may very well be of a comparable beefiness to any lining that one might sew in. I admit, I'm not fond of the idea of interior sheet inside, sliping around. I don't even like that for jacket pockets, though deal with it.

As for Fannie May, I never heard that name until the news over a decade ago about high risk mortgages packaged as low risk investments. I thought it was the name of a person behind a large financial company, but googling just now reveals that it is slang for FNMA (Federal National Mortgage Association) Weird how the minds in the industry work.

@Maria: Hello, fellow Ottawa-ian (Ottawanite?). I did indeed do the circuit of the outdoors stores, along with department stores and travel/luggage stores, when I bought my disintegrating Lowe Alpine. A number of times, actually, so I fear that I did a number on the environment to get the currently dying waist pouch. I recall that it was hard to find something like the one that it was replacing. It might have been the dark years for waist pouches, and/or I was too married to my conception of a waist pouch as the 80's style pouch. I appreciate your offer to assess a new lining, but as you said, it's a thin vinyl shell. It's not worth it.

When I get a chance, I'm going to collate some of the brand names and models that have been suggested across various forums, then decide on what to do. It could be visiting certain stores to see what they have (with points given if they coincide with the positives from the forums), ordering from the U.S., or ordering from abroad. The closer the home, the more points -- keeping in mind that it's just a rough gauging of pros and cons based on the information I have rather than actually tallying numerical points.

I will be keeping in mind that there is probably no limit to the amount of time and effort that one can devote to systematically gathering and comparing all information about the possibilities presented thus far. I will be consciously limiting the time on this.

You mentioned the possibility of a design jumping out at me, and that will certainly play into the final decision. What I was hoping to focus on here was models/brands that are likely to have a long lasting inner coating and/or those that are likely not to have this. It's not something that is obvious from looking at the design.

Posted by
12875 posts

@ andy...The Eagle Creek waist belt I used from 2001 to 2018 served me well, never one instance of being "picked"...not even close, if you know what you're doing. I had hidden away cash in there, my 35 mm camera before switching over to a Canon digital, Euro coins hidden in the 35 mm film container, energy bar, and all sorts of odds and ends. Yes, it did have a lining divider.

The new Eagle Creek waist belt is equally satisfactory. Of course, I could have gone to a store here that repairs luggage pieces to see if a new zipper could be added.

It's not exactly the same, but you make some adjustments and it serves the purpose just as well, The new one has the extra feature of a zippered inside "pocket"...very handy. No concerns about getting picked or making oneself conspicuous as a target by having on a waist belt ...just not going to happen.

Posted by
3789 posts

That's a lot of work, Andy. But, if you want it to last....
I happened to look at the Capital City website for their waist bags. Me, I tend to avoid 'anti theft' bags just on principle, as well as RFID. I expect all those are going to have layers you may not like.
I googled the TUMI packs, but in the search Google 'offered' 2 styles that might be if interest - if you are willing to move from 1980s to 2020. Lululemon and Herschel have 2 designs that are fabric based, meaning no vinyl disintegration - but then it most likely has a lining to deal with.
One Herschel option
https://herschel.ca/shop/hip-packs/tour-hip-pack-medium?CAWELAID=120246760000009626&CAGPSPN=pla&CAAGID=56353599344&CATCI=pla-693664971333&mkwid=BJiw0LFN&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google_shopping&utm_campaign=Herschel_Shop_Hip_Packs_CA&utm_term=&utm_content=BJiw0LFN|pcrid|236413684244|pkw||pmt||pdv|c|productid|10335-01174-OS|&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjemIvJ3u4wIVA1YMCh01KQj6EAQYAyABEgJrAPD_BwE&v=10715-01174-OS
and the Lululemon option.
https://shop.lululemon.com/p/bags/On-the-Beat-Belt-Bag/_/prod9260234?color=LW9BORS_0001&skuId=107375766&locale=en_CA&sl=CA&CAWELAID=120279050000447268&CID=Google_Women_Shopping_CA&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjemIvJ3u4wIVA1YMCh01KQj6EAQYASABEgIZKfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
Not sure where you find Herschel, but they are popular well made backpacks, and I see a lot of them around. May be worth a Rideau Centre visit as there is also a Tumi store there.
Oh, and Herschel is a Canadian brand, by the way.

Posted by
1884 posts

I wanted to mention, for completeness and archival value as well as clarification, a little note about fit and floppiness and body type when choosing a fanny pack --
if you are a beanpole, a stick, etc, then the banana-style or modified banana-style packs may very well tend to be floppy for you, while if you are carrying a spare tire, or are jolly, have a beer belly, or lean lumpy, etc. (as I do) then the square-style pack may very well bulge out like an ice chest on your luggage rack -- so it's best for the tubby to go for the banana shape, usually, and the ramrods to go for the square shaped packs.

Not unrelated is the way that you wear your backpack, of whatever type. Many people are letting it hang too far down from their shoulders -- they need to tighten those straps and get that pack up higher! If your fanny pack and your RS convertible carryon are quarreling with each other behind your back, it means you need to rein that backpack in and boost it up.

Posted by
3428 posts

Andymhancock- Tumi now has at least a couple of waist bags and several crossbody bags. You might also want to check out Baggallini. Yes, most of their line is women's purses, but they do have a couple of waist bags that are rather gender neutral looking. I've used several of their products over the years and find them durable and 'user friendly' in how they are organized. Here is their website link [https://www.baggallini.com/search?q=waist+bag][1]

Oh- and here's a link for Tumi's waist bags [https://www.tumi.com/search?text=waist+bag][2]

Posted by
10 posts

I posted a vetting and collation of brands and stores yesterday, after reading the most recent responses, but got a message saying that it needed reviewing. I won't try reposting those details today, for fear of being blocked again.

I went to two lululemons, Tumi, some sports stores, The Bay, Harry Rosen, Benton (luggage), Walmart, Capital City luggage, and all the outdoor stores in the city.

As it turns out, the stores carry very little of what they list online, and sometimes none. However, physically trying out the waist pouch is critical, as I often found that an excellent pouch design can be undermined by straps that take a lot of fiddling to switch between waist mode and shoulder sling mode. Not something you want to mess with when hauling luggage with travel papers through airport processes.

I also found that my concerns about delaminating waterproof lining was unwarranted, as this was almost nonexistent.

Another lesson learned was to not go to outdoor stores if you want a tourist pouch. Way too many outdoorsy doo dads for city slicking.

RFID shielding and money hiding was not one of my criteria, and I found those bags to be incredibly beefy and expensive. Best for those travelling in riskier territory.

The contenders were:

lululemon On The Beat Belt Bag 4.5L
http://shop.lululemon.com/p/bags/On-the-Beat-Belt-Bag/_/prod9260234?color=0001

Adidas
Looks like this one:
http://www.adidas.ca/en/waist-bag/ED6876.html

North Face
Looked like this, but green:
http://www.thenorthface.com/shop/bozer-hip-pack-nf0a2ucx-en-ca

The Adidas looked like an ad billboard, and the inside was coated with a rubbery surface. There was a risk of disintegration. The belt strap had way too much length than could be constrained by the clasp, but those really wanting it could simply shove the extra length between the pouch and their belly.

The North Face took way, way too much coddling to switch between waist mode and shoulder sling mode.

That left only the lululemon lululemon On The Beat Belt Bag. As I said, I'm not much of a traveller, so the belt bag will be on stand-by until the rare occassions when I travel.

Thanks for all your help, everyone.

Posted by
3789 posts

Glad you came up with a solution and reported back. Pretty classic design.

Posted by
1277 posts

Thanks for checking back, and delaminating is an excellent description

Posted by
10 posts

Actually, I took it for a test drive. Literally, while I was driving around on my errands. Unlike my 80s waist pouch, the buckle is big, and presses into my back. In the previous (delaminated) pouch, I could adjust both the left and right halves of the belt and move the buckle way off to one side while it was in shoulder-sling mode, making the problem go away. In contrast, the new lululemon pouch only has one side adjustable, so I can't control where the buckle is and set the proper length at the same time. The buckle isn't right at the lumbar height, so it is tolerable for short drives, but I think I need to re-examine the Adidas alternative to see if it is adjustable on both sides (I think it wasn't). The North Face pouch was adjustable on both sides, but it was just too much of a headache to adjust the straps between waist-worn and shoulder-slung.

I could always just place the pouch on the dash when driving, but that's in invitation to forget it there. Any contents would boil, and it would definitely attract unwanted attention. Throwing it in the trunk is also an invitation to forget it there, and it also puts the contents out of reach when simply stopped.

Posted by
10 posts

Thanks, Bogiesan, but from my experience in finding the now-delaminated pouch and the current exploration, the pouch needs to be seen and messed around with in person. I haven't come across the Mountainsmith brand in the local bricks and mortar shops. However, I did revisit the three contenders. As an alternative to the lululemon option, the Adidas had a smaller buckle, but still adjustable on only one side, and the pouch itself was too small. So I went with North Face. If I find the excess strap length too much trouble, I will get a tailor to truncate it.