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Coffee Bags

I recently discovered M & S Coffee Bags.

Throw one into a cup, add boiling water, wait 4 minutes, and you have coffee. Much, much better than instant and fairly close to a decent cup of coffee. I got the Italian Roast because I like dark coffee. About 22 cents (US) each. Ten to a box.

In the U.S. I could only find cheap mass produced ones.

Posted by
9106 posts

Folgers has been selling coffee bags in the US for several years. If you go on Amazon you'll see lots of others brands as well.

Posted by
15510 posts

Folgers is the cheap brand I was referring to. And the others are very expensive.

Yes, they have decaf.

Posted by
9106 posts

The pricing on Folgers bags typically works out to around .50 per bag. That's more than twice the cost of M&S.

Posted by
3926 posts

Thanks Frank, I will order the decaf. That’s all my hubby can drink and it is not always available.

Posted by
1259 posts

Coffee is something I know well. Portable caffeine delivery systems such as pocket brewers, high quality solubles, and infusion packaging have made advances in palatability. There are three amjor suppliers of the new instants in USA: Voila', Swift Cup, and Starbucks. The first two offer OEM processing for interesting small batch roasters while Stabucks offers its Via brand. The trick to getting drankable coffee from a powder is to use water at 160-175F; any hotter and the fragile aromatics that have survived will quickly volatize and disappear. Sachets and pacektized coffees offer a slightly better cup than a powder but one cannot expect anything approaching the experience of drinking freshly ground and brewed beans. Shop wide and carefully for portable coffees. The two more reliable indicators of likely quality are very high prices and a brand or roaster's name you recognize.

current resources: Davids, Kenneth: "21st Century Coffee: A guide" and Davids' website www.coffeereview.com

Posted by
15510 posts

Bogiesan.....I wake up. I stumble into the bathroom to fill the kettle. When it boils I pour water over the coffee bag. Four minutes later I remove the bag, add some milk and drink. About halfway through my brain starts to function.

If it tastes decent to me I'm happy.

Posted by
6784 posts

I've been using an Aeropress for the last 4-5 years and find it almost as simple as a pour-over coffee bag, but much better-tasting. I can even bring the travel version with me on trips.

That said, I do like the Starbucks Via packets for drinking decaf in the afternoon. I don't drink decaf a lot so I hate buying decaf coffee beans that will get old, but those work well for that. I might try your coffee bags for that, Frank!

Posted by
1259 posts

I used to travel domestically with a Nespresso mini, all secure in hardshell case. Talk about simple: on, capsule, button, slurp.

Posted by
2267 posts

I've tried tea-type bags, but have encountered an acceptable cup. And my standards aren't that high.

Like Mardee, I've taken to traveling with an Aeropress. As much as I love espresso, I really want my first cup to be a larger serving of drip/filter. And because it's how I make coffee at home, the sleepy-headed cognitive challenge is nil.