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2016 summer trip clothing observations in Europe

Hi all, just got back from 3 weeks in England, France, Germany, northern Italy, Salzburg, and Prague. My family of four followed the recommendations of many websites as what to wear. Boy, were we fooled. I enforced the slacks or trouser in dark, the long sleeve shirts in neutral colors, wife wore longer skirts, kids wore dress or casual shoes as did I. No shorts and we thought we were going to look like Europeans. We did, if we were 60. Here are the current summer facts about what locals wore in all the cities and towns.

Shorts of normal colors that were not baggy, but tight fitting. They were often rolled an inch or less at the bottom and ended about 4-5" above the knees. You can buy them over there easily if you can't find them in US or Canada. They do sell cargo shorts in stores in Italy, but again they are tighter fitting. Men and boys both wore them. Get them and ditch to long pants during the hot days. Mine were yellow-tan made by HH. You can wear them anywhere and fit right in.

Pants are typically tapers to be straight or tapered at the calf. Not typically baggy legs like dockers are. All ages wear denim and the slashed ones were popular with the teens. Wear them for dinner or more formal times. Wear a belt as you want to look good, don't you?

Shirts were all over the board. Just no white tees, no "I love New York" or such. Most wore polo shirts or button shirts with roll up sleeves and straps to hold the sleeve up or not. At night just roll the sleeves down. All colors were there, really not neutral ones.

Shoes were anywhere from all white Stan Smith by Additas (sold in all stores) to sparkling converses. Most seem to where a tan or brown casual or converse style shoe. If they were wearing a tie, then dress shoes were a must. Sandals are gaining popularity as seen. Flip flops were either tourists or beach wear. Leave them for the beach.

Socks were usually no-see or quarter socks. No white ones though. Buy yourself some Darn Tough socks. They lasted a long time and didn't smell after a few day of wearing them all day doing a lot of walking.

Don't go topless (guys) in Venice as it is illegal.

We looked really stupid in our hot semi-dress clothes around the rest of the tourists, who by the way are also Europeans. Just take a bit of advice. You are a tourist when you have a back pack on. Leave it at a hotel or train station locker. Same with toting luggage. Leave the luggage at home and buy a back pack that fits in Easy Jet or Ryan Air over heads. You are a tourist when you have the maps out. Use your phone as it is less obvious. Just look and walk with a purpose.

Also, learn the basics of the language for the country you are visiting. Hello, goodbye, good morning or good day, and please and thank you are so very basic and easy to learn on the plane ride over. If you are not courteous, you will be treated the same way.

A local from Rome told me a bit of advice. Watch out for the Gypsies in Europe. They work in teams of 2-3. Don't set your bags down unless they are in front of you. Don't leave any items visible in a car. They try to dress like Italians and mislead you.

I was never targeted and kept my wallet in my front pocket or a zippered rear. Pick pockets are everywhere tourist may be. Don't offer to pick up something grandma has dropped in front of you.

Oh, as for washing clothes over there... we chose to rent a flat or apartment with a washer and dryer (very small over there) on days where we figured we'd need to wash. If not, there are very few Laundromats. They are also called washerettes. Just Yelp for one in the city you are in. Prague has a good one, 2 large loads washed and dried for about $10. Weymouth UK has one for the same cost. Hard to find in Germany and we didn't look in Italy. They have soap for a small fee. Washing and drying in your room or bathroom is a pain. They mostly have poor air circulation.

Posted by
1068 posts

I just got back from a month in Scandinavia and Scotland. I think we have very different observations about clothing.

Posted by
8 posts

I wish I could post pictures. My travels involved very warm temps. Perhaps in the colder regions they are not wearing shorts. Cheers.

Posted by
5007 posts

We never felt that we "looked stupid" by wearing comfortable but slightly conservative clothes. But then, we are over 60...

Posted by
2353 posts

Where did you read all those rules of what to wear?

I think people get confused when traveling...perhaps they think everyone else they see is traveling too! When visiting large cities like Paris or London or Rome - these are all functioning, working cities so not only do you see the tourists there you see the people who work there. Business/professional attire is generally different than tourist/its my day off attire. In general business attire tend to be more darker colors and muted tones - I think that is where tourists get de-railed in their wardrobe - but you are not going there to work.

If you look around at the locals on a Saturday or those off work & picnicing in a park or at the local market they are not dressed in their business attire but in regular everyday clothes just like most folks.

For us - we wear what we want and is comfortable - I have no fashion police to answer to!

Posted by
54 posts

We just came back from three weeks in Italy. Don't believe them when they tell you that the locals don't eber wear shorts, sneakers or ball caps. The were everywhere, locals included. Cargo shorts, tennis shoes, ball cap and ExOfficio shirts was what I wore 80% of the time. In the evenings I wore a light pair of pants. I was a tourist but still felt like I fit right in.

Posted by
1290 posts

Hubby and i wore clothes right out of our closet (we live in southern California) and never felt out of place, in fact I was asked for directions. Your family must have been giving you the stink eye until you bought them new clothes! Glad you found some comfortable clothes because that is what it is all about. Look on Webcam of the cities you plan to visit next time to see what people wear and you will find there are no "rules". I can always tell a hot day by what people are wearing. Yes I can tell who the tourists are, but not what country they are from. We are planning a trip for May 2017 and there will be cargo shorts and Levi jeans packed, no skinny leg for hubby his thighs would never fit and tank maxi dresses for me. I also enjoy looking at people's travel videos for travel tips and not only see what they are wearing but also people in the background and the scrapbook section of this website has wonderful photos and great info!

Posted by
13542 posts

I have a confession to make. I will do it here, but please don’t spread it around…… I am …. Well at least when I am traveling, I am …. This is so hard…. I AM A TOURIST! There I said it. I feel much better now.

I would suggest that when traveling you will meet more people if you appear to be a tourist. In many parts of the world, the places I visit at least, the locals enjoy showing off their towns and cities. You miss that interaction if you travel incognito.

I’m not saying wear a advertising banner, but at least don’t worry about it. I think it’s a lot more important to be respectful. For instance, I would concentrate less on what sort of dress you can “get away with” when entering a church and more about what sort of dress makes the best statement about your character. Yes, if you wear jeans to the Opera they won’t throw you out, but is that really the right thing to do? Is that the right way to represent your home country and yourself?

As for these description of “the locals” I doubt citizens of the UK are any more or less homogeneous than in the US; so finding a standard isn’t really practical. It’s about social position, region, age, religion, etc. The statement that this is how a French person dresses is a little bizarre. Okay, not many wear cowboy boots so if you see those you have found an American; but not necessarily a Texan.

If you are 25 you will see life through one set of ideas and everyone will be dressed as ________, if you are 65 you will see something totally different. If you are in Old Town Prague the only locals you will see are people serving the tourist industry; dressed appropriately for that job which as mentioned above, has nothing to do with real life.

Decide what sort of image you want to portray and be comfortable with who you are.

Posted by
7597 posts

James, I love your opening paragraph (all of your post is spot on, but that opener made me laugh!). As did Letizia imagining the OP's family giving him the STINKEYE.

Posted by
971 posts

Christi I think you are spot on!

Personally I just came back yesterday from my second trip to London in a month. My fist trip was a holiday and i was wearing sneakers, shorts and t-shirts, all very comfortable and the typical tourist/day off attire. I definately stood out as a tourist, but who cares, I was a tourist!
The second trip was for business and i was wearing casual business attire, (black leather shoes, dark jeans and shirts, which seems to be the standard business clothes in London). I must admit it felt nice to blend in with the everyday working crowd in London; go to pubs after work with my collegues after work and not feel out of place among the locals, stare at the ground and avoiding eye contact in the morning rush hour on the Tube. However I would never try to dress like a local I order to fit in if I was on holiday: Why try to pretend to be something you are not? Also I totally wear shorts and t-shirt when I am at work at home and I don't have any meetings and is just going to be at the office.

Posted by
2318 posts

I am also wondering what websites suggested wearing staid, conservative clothes all over Europe...Fortunately my every-day casual wardrobe at home is also appropriate for travel--jeans, boots, cute top or T, sometimes a scarf (which seems to be de rigeur in Paris). Depending on where I am and if I have my camera out I have blended in enough to be taken for a local--which delights me--but I am perfectly fine being taken for a tourist. I will say that if I plan to attend the theatre or opera I feel better if I wear a dress and heels--on my recent trip to Budapest's lovely Opera there was everything from evening gowns, tuxedos, dressy pants and tops for women and men in dress shirt and slacks--and one fellow in a scroungy hoodie.

Posted by
8403 posts

Yikes--the original dress code sounds like a religious order: neutral colors, long sleeves. Your poor feet in dress shoes! I hope you enjoyed getting items to change your wardrobe.

Anyway, I can only speak for France because that's our country, but there dress has changed a lot in the last five years. Before you wouldn't see shorts and athletic shoes except at camp grounds and the like, but today they are worn in the cities. Jeans have gone chic and shabby. Just last month my husband wore jeans for six weeks in France--city or countryside--and he's over sixty.

The one big difference is the cut of the clothing: a lot of European clothing is closer to the body, but even at swimming areas some young men are wearing those baggy, knee-length things we see in the States.

Edit: I changed my words from Europe to France based on subsequent posts because frankly, I don't have a clue what people wear in Scotland or Poland, though the shirt unclegus linked to in the post on shirts with cell phone pockets was fitted, as was the Marmot shirt, something you will have a very hard time finding in the States.

Posted by
11450 posts

Fireman it was not on this website!

I would never force my kids ti dress like old people, and their first visits they were aged between 11-13( they are now 20-26) so even a decade ago i did not dork my kids out lol. I did make sure they had comfy shoes( they all wore running shoes and girl had nice sandals ) though, not flip flops.

No dark long sleeved shirts( dark for summer?)

Knee lenght sundresses, well you do need at least one for churchs in italy OR a pair of capris.

I wish i knew which websites suggest teens in slacks, that is so dorky, i even let my kids bring jeans with only warning they are hot in heat.

We just back from a month in London, greece,spain,ireland ,amsterdam and paris and my hubby brought jeans , no dockers, and we are mid fifities.

It sounds like you had fun regardless , and next time check out this forum or ta and make sure those suggesting stuff for kids actually have taken kids to europe in last decade or so....lol

Posted by
11450 posts

Ps my daughter and her friends were backpacking around europe this spring and met us in Mallorca, they all agreed their converse runners were not as comfy as they are at home, obviously because at home they dont walk 15 miles a day in them like in europe! They had brought back up running type shoes and they all were wearing them by that point, saving their converse for evening dress up for dinners lol

Posted by
971 posts

To add to Ray's comment, yes the style is very much different in Scandinavia and Scotland compared to London, Paris southern Europe etc. To think that there is a pan European style, as some posters here seem to suggest, is just preposterous. The 45 plus countries of the continent of Europe are wastly different, not just regarding styles of clothes, yet many people on this forum refer to Europe as a single country with a uniform culture etc.

Posted by
2526 posts

As to what to wear, seemingly many newbies to Europe get their knickers are bunched up well in advance. Wishing to look perfectly as a local and in the many countries of Europe, when you are not, is humorous to me.

Posted by
8 posts

What a great discussion. I was asked what websites told me to dress the way I prepared in order to fit in an not look like a tourist. Honestly, one was this website by Mr. Steves. He has great points, but he is my age plus and not my kids age. However, we did look really sharp, but were too hot. As for the 60 age comment, that wasn't meant to be a bad thing, but a 60 year old and a 21 year old dress differently everywhere. By the way, a good travel backpack really was the way to go for us. Just take it off before you enter a crowded tube anywhere as you don't want smash someone or give them the opportunity to open compartments. Don't look at the ground when using the Tube as one person mentioned. You need to see where you are going and what other people on the train, tram, bus, subway are doing. Otherwise, you could become a victim. We had a blast everywhere we went and had some great conversations with other riders.

My wife showed me how to roll my clothes to prevent many wrinkles. It works much better than just folding and hoping for the best in a back pack.

One more tiny thing I forgot to mention. Bring that windbreaker/rain repeller as it came in handy many times.

Posted by
49 posts

I agree that much of the information the OP posted is indeed found on this website. When I first started researching our trip-which leaves next Friday-I searched and searched this site for articles and threads on what to pack and what not to pack. A rundown of some of the don'ts I came across are:

  1. Don't wear jeans-I think this one was a packing issue because of bulk and difficulty drying

  2. No shorts for men or women-children were okay to wear shorts

  3. No short skirts or dresses

  4. No athletic shoes or caps

  5. No athletic wear unless you are working out

  6. No bright colors-Europeans don't wear bright colors

  7. No T-shirts with sayings on the front

These are just the ones I can remember off the top of my head. Most of these came with the thought that if you want to look like and travel like a local, these are the basics to follow. it would be very easy for a newbie to get a skewed perspective. Fortunately after much research over the past year and reading every scrapbook over the past three years, I adjusted what we are taking. We will wear jeans on the plane in case we want them. I am packing shorts for my husband and he will take a pair of his Brooks shoes. We are also wearing colors that we would normally wear at home.

I see why people say they tweak their packing lists after their trips. I haven't even gone yet and I have tweaked mine several times.

Happy Travels!
Rachel

Posted by
13542 posts

MrsEB, that would be the Hungarian State Opera House in Budapest. That evening was about 98% Hungarians and 2% foreign nationals. Sorry Rick, the tux didn't fit in my carry on.

cbburgmd, my thoughts:

1.Don't wear jeans-I think this one was a packing issue because of bulk and difficulty drying

I agree based on the packing issues. I tend to wear nylon fishing trousers from Bas Pro. If its cold I put thermals under them.

2.No shorts for men or women-children were okay to wear shorts

I sort of like to spend the day with the greatest number of options and wearing shorts limits a few of those options. Doesn't have to, but as a guest I try and do a little more than the absolute minimum allowed. So on that basis I agree. But if I am off to Lake Balaton or Margaret Island, then sure, shorts.

3.No short skirts or dresses

I need to spend more time sitting in a café on a warm afternoon studying this one.....

4.No athletic shoes or caps

Up to about 40 years of age, both are pretty common where I travel. But I my personal comfort sort of rules them out except in the countryside. I have noticed in life that you get what you give; so if you look real casual you get treated real casual and if you look professional you tend to get treated professional. That at times can translate into better service.

5.No athletic wear unless you are working out

See 4 above

6.No bright colors-Europeans don't wear bright colors

Ahhh, who knows. I don't see many bright colors in the American culture I am part of.

7.No T-shirts with sayings on the front

With the exception of British Stag parties I cant recall seeing many t-shirts but don't think they would draw attention if you did.

Posted by
8403 posts

As said earlier, I have seen a big change in dress these past few years.
Maybe some of those old threads need a warning sign: no longer accurate.

Posted by
27720 posts

I dunno, it seems that that white dress seems to work, somehow. I mean, it seems everybody is wearing it. But only on the aisles. How do those Hungarians get their seats by colour?

Posted by
49 posts

James-- I can appreciate everyone has their own view of what to pack based on what works for them as evidenced by your post. Other than the jeans, the suggestions were made because you won't see people wearing those things in Europe and if you want to fit in, don't wear them. I think now some people are returning from their trips and realizing those suggestions aren't completely accurate. Europeans are wearing athletic shoes during the day, whether or not they are receiving adequate service, I have no idea.

My point is that much of the information the OP mentioned can be found on this website and on some threads, there is a huge emphasis on blending in and looking like a local. I completely understand how some people come away thinking they need to get a whole new travel wardrobe of moisture wicking, quick drying clothing that somehow makes them look like they are from Europe. I think the more one travels, the more they realize what works best. You have obviously traveled extensively and know what works for you.

We will all be waiting to hear a report on your "short skirt/dress" research :)

Posted by
13542 posts

cbburgmd; nothing was meant to be critical. Just my observations and what I am comfortable with. I'm no fashion expert. But maybe for some context. I wear fishing clothing purchased from Bass Pro most of the time. Three sets of trousers and shirts. They are cool, wash in the sink and dry in two hours. I also carry a navy sports coat, grey slacks, blue dress shirt, black shoes and a tie. Unbelievably it all fits in a carry on (except the sports coat which I wear on the plane and all the pockets come in handy for tickets, etc.). So like I implied, I don't worry too much about style, I just try and smell clean. I will start the skirt survey in about two weeks. Will keep everyone advised on my findings.

Posted by
12040 posts

"Honestly, one was this website by Mr. Steves."

Mr. Steves has some helpful wardrobe tips from a logistics stand point, but to be honest, he's usually completely off when he starts to talk about fashion. For example, he insisted that Europeans don't wear shorts for years, despite steadily mounting evidence to the contrary.

Posted by
13542 posts

Nigel, debutante ball; hence young ladies in white dresses. Entertainment by Plácido Domingo.

Posted by
11246 posts

Nothing on the internet ever disappears.

Many years ago, Rick wrote, and made videos, claiming all the "no-no's" of European dress--no jeans, no shorts, no loud colors, etc. And that stuff lasts forever.

However, times change. In a video after his most recent trip just a month ago, he admitted he wore jeans every day and never wore his famous khakis. (He also admits he doesn't follow his rule of just taking enough toiletries to get by and buying more there. He brings enough soap, shampoo and razor blades for his entire trip.)

Times change. Clothing changes. The internet stays. What this proves is when taking advice off the internet, see how old that advice really is.

I just got back from nine weeks overseas and I wore jeans every day. I brought two pairs of jeans and one pair of black pants. And I'm in my late 50's. I also wore polo shirts and plain colored T-shirts. Yes, I'm a tourist. It's hard to hide it. I dress for comfort but I also dress not to stand out too much.

Dress the way that makes you comfortable but be respectful of the area you are visiting.

Posted by
3932 posts

We always just wear what we wear at home. Hubby wears jeans and ONLY jeans, so that is what we pack now - even it was the dead of July, he'd still be in jeans. He bought some khakis and took them on our first trip in '08 - they never even came out of the suitcase, they ended up being more dead weight than the jeans, which he did wear. I bought a skirt to take and wore it a few times on holiday, but it hasn't seen the light of day again, so now we don't buy anything special and just take what we already have...

Posted by
2318 posts

James--Ha! Not me, since I go solo I leave my ball gown at home, though I expect it would be fun to ride the metro wearing one.

Posted by
1889 posts

•You can blame/credit me for any increase in shabby chic that you notice in southern Europe recently.
Not only do I model the torn jeans and moth-eaten bric-a-brac, I usually leave some of it behind for use by pattern makers.

•James' observation about how you're likely to be treated "I have noticed in life that you get what you give; so if you look real casual you get treated real casual and if you look professional you tend to get treated professional. That at times can translate into better service" is very very true.

Not only sartorially, but for both good and ill, it applies to the parts of one's presentation that can't be doffed. One just has to hope that one's winning personality has enough time to come across before the prejudices are triggered.

Posted by
13542 posts

christa, most trips are done in a carryon, but sometimes the itinerary just calls for a tux and a fur .... just for the experience. Ohhh, and we stayed a block from the Opera House so no metro required.

Posted by
11613 posts

You can fit in but not blend in - it's the map and water bottle that give us away.

My first task in Italy, every trip, is to get a haircut.

Posted by
1290 posts

Zoe-I wish I had your courage to get that hair cut, I am going to really challenge myself next trip to do just that! I was tempted in Paris, but I had not researched salons and did not know if I was going to be walking into a super cuts type place or a real salon.

Posted by
2353 posts

While I know European hair stylists go through much more training than their US counterparts. Why would a haircut in Europe make you look more like a local? This I do not understand. Yes there are a lot of bad hair stylists in the US (my guess is there are in Europe as well) and unfortunately people go to them - perhaps they do not know better. But if you are hair savvy enough to know a great cut & style from a bad one there are very talented stylists in the US.

I live in the middle of nowhere of the middle of nowhere but I drive 180 miles round trip for a good hair cut - oh my - I would hate to have to wait for a trip to Europe for a good haircut!

Posted by
13542 posts

I'm going bald, how does that fit into the equation? Gene, now I am worried.

Christi, do you go to SA or CC?

Posted by
2353 posts

I am so picky about my hair I couldn't even imagine having it done on vacation - one exception. Before my wedding my hair was very long - waist long and making me crazy but since my wedding was a Victorian theme I wanted to keep the long hair for a fab up-do! Well we went on a cruise for our honeymoon, I sneaked away as soon as we were on board to make an appt in the salon for the next morning.

When I arrived I told the young man I wanted it short - he was very hesitant to cut off all my length. I actually had to go back the next day and have him cut it shorter! I did end up with a cute bob after much direction from me.

Now I am blond but usually have some kind of purple in my hair. I break all of the clothing rules and wear brights - pink, yellow, lime green, purple, orange. For me black only belongs in a cocktail dress or leather! I am a dress girl and do not even own pants - leggings & yoga pants are the closest I come! I learned a long time ago photos turn out better when my DH & I wear complimentary colors!

Posted by
8111 posts

Have always just worn jeans and sneakers of some sort and this since 29 years. Fashion hasn't changed that much as far as shoes, jeans, or colors in those years. Wore Sketcher Shape-ups for quite a few years. All of my shirts are bright colors. No one ever mistakes me for being American, cause Germans ask me for directions constantly. They don't even know I am American when I speak, as they don't hear the accent. Usually, they guess UK. They know I am not German when I speak, but that is all.

Many American men wear their hair parted on the side. This is a give away. German women have this thing for henna and you see a lot of purple or bright read hair here. Clothing styles are similar thanks to H&M, Zara, Hilfinger, etc.

Posted by
5697 posts

I did get brave enough to have my hair cut in Paris, but since it was at the beginning of a 2-month trip the cut had grown out by the time we got back to where anybody knew me. Stylist spoke limited English, my French wasn't up to the task, so I looked through photo books and pointed out what I wanted to look like -- and then she indicated that my hair was the wrong type for that cut, and proceeded to do something else. But a fun experience overall.

Posted by
2526 posts

Had a great laugh as to these comments: "Older male visitors from the US tend to have very smart tidy hair.. The short back and sides with distinct side parting lives!! I presume this is because many are ex military." "Young American men/boys split into 2 groups, very short and smart or grown out, with an overly long fringe and slightly too much 'wet look product."

Posted by
11450 posts

Emma I think your observation on mens hair being because of men being ex military is very wrong.

We are Canadian.. but you( as we find most Europeons do) would assume we are American.. we look the same, talk the same as Pacific Northwesterners , and wear same clothes... but we don't even know any men who are ex military .. yet the hair cut you describe for middle aged men IS very common.. so nothing to do with military.

I also doubt that most American men even on this forum who sport that hair do .. do so because they are ex military.. maybe like a few.. but its not the reason they wear that style..

Posted by
11246 posts

I got my hair cut in London halfway through my last trip. It didn't look any different than what I would get in the States. (No part, sorry.)

And I went to a high end salon. I think it was called.......Supercuts.

Posted by
13542 posts
Posted by
2526 posts

@Emma. Generalizations are just that. I laughed because of an opinion contrary to yours and note that while the current and former members of our military are very significant, the percentage of those having served (male and female) are well in the minority, save for the oldest populations having served in WWII. In a random crowd of local males and then tossing in our son who lives there... good luck in identifying him.

Posted by
9706 posts

I had to smile at Emma's observation of American women and I fit that to the "T".

I did notice while I see women my age (mid 60s) in Italy, France and UK, I rarely see them with gray hair. I stopped coloring my hair at least 10 or 12 years ago because it was just insane to keep up with covering the gray roots. One of the few gray-haired women I noticed in Paris on a RS Best of Paris tour a couple of years ago was the amazing and excellent French guide we had for the Orangerie. She had a short gray bob and looked tres chic.

So...I'll add gray hair as a possible identifier for American women!

Posted by
8403 posts

Congratulations to Emma's super powers being able to peg (and stereotype) people. I've found, particularly on this year's trip, that many times I had assumed people were American, but when I got closer and could hear them speak, voila-- they were French--not even French Canadian. Being dual national, I should be able to peg and stereotype at least my two nationalities. Mais helas, I don't have super powers. Help me Emma!

Posted by
27720 posts

According to a tech podcast I heard this morning there is now a police app (devised in Russia,BTW) which can analyse CCTV and pictures for instant face detection..... I hope it doesn't put the superidentifiers out of business.

Posted by
319 posts

I am native German , live in the USA travel around the world. I wear what defines me and if I visit a church I respect the local customs. I have far more important things in life then to worry how long my shorts are or the color of my shirts. Common sense people.

Posted by
27720 posts

Aren't the Romulans the ones with the super cloaking device, bad personality, and bad teeth?

Posted by
2353 posts

Just no eye contact whilst studying them emma!

Posted by
513 posts

I am an over 70 American male and I have had my haircut in various European counties over the years - several cities in Germany, London, Dublin, Geneva and Basel in Switzerland, and various cities in Italy. The common problem I encountered in almost all of these situations is that they always wanted to cut my hair too short. I wear glasses, and when getting a haircut I am often at the mercy of the shop because I cannot see how short they have cut me until I put my glasses back on. And then, too, too often, it is too late ....

Posted by
13079 posts

My dad wore his thinning jet-black hair in a style just like Monsieur Hollande----and I am quite sure he did not pay $10,000 a month ( never made that much money in his life).

Posted by
2526 posts

It's 10,000€/month or about $11,107 USD, or $14,343 CAD! Must be an amazing barber, er hairdresser.