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Tips for Weighing Suitcase in Europe

We're spending two weeks in Paris, renting an apt... We're allowed up to 22 lbs for one carry-on and 26 lbs for a checked bag. I am taking a carry-on and checking a bag because... I plan to shop in Paris and bring home what I buy. I know how to weigh my bag here at home, but I'd like tips on how to weigh a bag while in Paris as I go along so I don't buy too much. And to know what my bag weighs before I get to the airport. The only thing I've thought of so far is to buy a scale but hoping someone has a better idea. Thank you!

Posted by
1143 posts

Hi Susan --
I have a luggage scale you can borrow. (I never use it.)
It weighs 6 ounces, but since you're checking a bag that won't be a factor.
I'll bring it to our travel meeting next weekend.
SharYn

Posted by
6615 posts

Susan that doesn't sound right - a 26 pound limit on checked luggage. What airline is that?

Posted by
8271 posts

Thanks Mira and thank you SharYn, so nice of you to offer, I accept!

Posted by
13467 posts

Susan that doesn't sound right - a 26 pound limit on checked luggage.
What airline is that?

That doesn't sound right to me either. Maximum checked baggage weights across the board are usually somewhere between 44-70 pounds depending on airline. Care to share which one you're flying?

Posted by
6866 posts

Most airlines hold you to 10 kg (22 lbs.) for carry on's and 20 kg (44 lbs.) for check in's.
We follow Rick's packing list and get by on 10 kg for all trips--carry on only. I cannot imagine you purchasing items weighing 44 lbs.

Posted by
8271 posts

WoW Airlines. I did not choose the airline, the trip was a gift.

Posted by
21026 posts

Susan, I have good news: I believe you have misinterpreted WOW's baggage limits. 26 lb. is the weight limit if you pay to carry on a larger-than-standard bag. Such extra-charge bags can be up to 56x45x25 cm including handles and wheels. You'd probably have a few extra ounces there, because they state the limit as "12 kg (26 lb.)", and 12 kg is actually a bit more than 26 lb.

This is what WOW's website says about your checked baggage:

"Checked-in bags can weigh up to 20 kg. Overweight bags are charged per kg over the standard 20 kg limit. Bags over 32 kg cannot be checked in at all.
The combined dimensions of each checked bag must not exceed 158 cm (62 in)."

20 kg. is 44 lb.

Posted by
8271 posts

acraven, I'd give you a hug if I could. I Googled for the info before posting this morning and read what looked like WoW's info on it. Now, of course, I can't find what I found earlier today via Google. But I did read, just now, exactly what you said.

So thank you acraven! And David, stan, and Kathy...

Posted by
3105 posts

I'm glad you got the weight thing sorted out. That will be a relief, however I could see you buying some potentially heavy things in France. I have several pieces of Emile Henry and Le Creuset cookware I've brought home over various trips. Every time we are in Europe I look around and threaten to bring home a carved out stone trough planter. I've been wanting one for 40 years and I haven't convinced my husband to carve one for me yet either.

Posted by
6615 posts

Susan, if you buy a lot of stuff over there, you can always buy another bag over there as well. We usually pack an empty duffle bag to take with us, and check it on the way back with dirty clothes, liquid souvenirs and expendable things, leaving our carryon lighter for the more valuable items.

Posted by
8271 posts

Mona, yes, I could bring back 44lbs or more of stuff pretty easily. Le Creuset and Emile Henry would definitely eat up those lbs quickly, nice that you were able to bring those home! I would love one of those carved out troughs too. So if you decide to bring one home, bring one for me too please... : )

Posted by
8271 posts

stan, thank you for your suggestion, it's a good one. I've actually done that twice before... bought a rolling duffel bag one time and a suitcase another time, in Paris, to bring things home. This time I'm thinking ahead and bringing one with me!

Posted by
11212 posts

If you know you are planning to buy things like Le Creuset, do yourself a favor and price them here first. They may actually be cheaper.

Many years ago I wanted to buy a Burberry coat. I knew what it would cost me in the U.S. but thought it would be cheaper in London. It wasn't.

Posted by
3105 posts

@Frank II, I did know what similar pieces of cookware were going for here at Williams-Sonoma and the outlet stores before I bought, at less than 1/2 price, and brought home some French cookware. We usually have a house exchange going so I'm not lugging it all over Europe prior to bring it home.

Your suggestion is a good reminder for any gifts, heavy or light though. Sometimes I've run through the housewares section of our local Tuesday Morning store to check out their glassware and kitchen stuff before heading to Europe. You'd be surprised to see what authentic imports regularly are on the the shelves and I buy here rather than bring it home from Europe. Examples: several pieces of Polish pottery, some Czech glassware, a wonderful stein with a stork on it the year we were going to Strasbourg, "extra" wooden Christmas things, a spätzela maker, etc.

Posted by
8271 posts

Good tip Frank II. I've been surprised a few times that I can get the same thing here for less. Birkenstocks are a good example. I'm planning on shopping at the Vanves flea market and outdoor marchés, as well as small and big stores but only for things I can't get here.

Posted by
4978 posts

Mona, a carved out stone trough planter? More information, please! Pictures?

And for the record, after our stay in Poland years ago, when it was time to return home, we bought cheap but good-looking luggage and filled it with our three years of accumulations. At least one of the suitcases lasted until we got back to the States.

Posted by
3105 posts

Old carved stone farm sinks and water troughs for animals are finding new life as planters and water features. Do a google image search to see some examples. I don't want a modern cast concrete one, I prefer stone... My garden adaption here is that I have a collection of different sized clay chimney flue liners that I use as planters.

Posted by
8271 posts

MrsEB, thank you but was hoping to avoid taking my suitcase somewhere every so often to see how much more I can buy. Mira's idea and SharYn's kind offer will be easier.

Posted by
8271 posts

I've seen old stone troughs used as planters all over France and Italy. I would love to have one. So much character and history in them. Great souvenir.

Posted by
8271 posts

Might have some "splainin" to do at airport security... Hmm, how about checking it as "oversized" luggage.. 😂