schengen question

heey everyone
I was just wondering, the schengen visa says 90 days out of 180 days so if i stay three months in schengen i have to be out for another three to come back in.. but what if i stay for 2 months in schengen and then go to russia or turkey for example, would I have to spend 3 or 4 months out of schengen? thaanks (:

Posted by carolina
santiago
5 posts

first of all, thanks everyone for all the replies, and as far as I'm aware I dont need a visa, so that part's ticked off. My question was if , like I said, I spent 60 days in a schengen area and then left for a non schengen area would I then have to spend 90 days out in order to back another ninety or would I have to stay for 120? I know I would still have 30 days remaining but if I used those then I'd be travelling way into central Europe and far from non-Schengen areas..Anyway, if I did do that, which non-schengen countries would you recommend? hopefully somewhere that's cheap and has lots to keep me busy for 90 days heheh (:

Posted by Tom
Hüttenfeld, Hessen, Germany
9130 posts

"I spent 60 days in a schengen area and then left for a non schengen area would I then have to spend 90 days out in order to back another ninety or would I have to stay for 120?" You would have to stay out for 120 before your allotment resets back to a fresh 90.

Posted by Ken
Vernon, Canada
17780 posts

carolina, One additional point to mention.... You WILL need a Visa to enter Russia. They tend to be a bit expensive and the process to obtain one sometimes takes some time. Given your home location, it would be a good idea to check the Visa requirements for every country you'll be visiting. Turkey also requires a Visa, but that can be obtained at the border / airport (again for a fee). Cheers!

Posted by Ken
Vernon, Canada
17780 posts

carolina, As I understand the rules, you're allowed to stay in the Schengen zone for a maximum of 90 days in any 180 day period. Your time allotment begins at your first point of entry to the Schengen zone (your Passport will be stamped) and this both allows your stay for 90 days as well as determines when you can return. If you stay for two months and then go to a non-Schengen country, you still have one month of your allotment remaining. Once you've used your 90 days, you must leave the Schengen zone for a further 90 days. I don't believe that the U.K., Ireland or some of the countries in eastern Europe are included in the Schengen zone, so you could also go there once you've reached your time limit. This is only my interpretation, and hopefully that's reasonably easy to understand. Some of the others here have posted good information on this, so hopefully they'll spot this post. Happy travels!

Posted by Nigel
East Midlands, England
8756 posts

hello carolina with two e's and 2 a's, If santiago is santiago in Chile, I don't know anything about whatever Schengen visa program or visa waiver program would apply nor any change in the rules from USA. If you are a US citizen coming from the US, I know that the Schengen visa waiver program allows you to remain for up to 90 non consecutive days out of any 180 consecutive days. When you come and go each 90 day period would pause while you are gone but each 180 days keeps running. You mention both month and 90 days. Be clear that the number of months (varying numbers of days) has no bearing it is exactly and no more than 90 days. So, your first example above:
You need to count the days in each month. If you enter on June 1 and leave on 31 August that is 92 days (you count any day or portion of a day you are in the area) you have broken the law. You are only allowed a maximum of 90 days. So, if you leave on 29 August that is 90 days and you must wait until the completion of 180 days from your entry on June 1 before you can return - assuming you have no previous 180 day clocks still running.

Posted by Nigel
East Midlands, England
8756 posts

... more ...
In your second example, the same rules apply. If you enter 1 June and leave 31 July for Russia or Turkey you will have spent 61 days of your 90. You could return the very next day from Russia or Turkey and spend up to the balance of 29 days within the 180. If you stayed away 90 days and returned on the 151st day of your initial 180 you would still have (180-151 =29 days and 61+29 = 90 days) from the initial entry. The first clock would end at that 180th day. A new 180 day clock would also start on the 151st day - whatever date that was, I'm too lazy to do the math - which would govern when you had to leave from the second entry. Yes you would have 2 different 180 day clocks running within each you would be allowed no more than 90 days in the Schengen zone. You also have a 180 day clock running starting each day you remained in the zone during the first entry. So from that 61st day that clock limits you to no more than 90 days in that 180, of which you will have spent 1 until you return from Russia. So you can never have more than 90 in any 180, no matter how you slice it.

Posted by Tom
Hüttenfeld, Hessen, Germany
9130 posts

Once you hit the ground and have your passport stamped, that starts the 90 and the 180 day clocks. When you leave the Schengen Zone, the 90 day clock stops, but not the 180 day timer. You don't get 90 more days until the initial 180 days elapse. So to answer your question specifically, if you only use 60 days of your allotment, you can return anytime within 120 days after your initial entry to use the remaining 30 days. But your total allotment won't reset until 180 days after that initial entry. PS- Chile is a participant in the Schengen visa waiver program, so the same answers we give to people from the US and Canada would apply to you.