Schengen Area Passport Validity Requirements

I just saw this posted on TripAdvisor: SCHENGEN AREA: PASSPORT VALIDITY REQUIREMENT On 26 June 2013, the European Union published regulation EU 610/2013, modifying Regulation EU 562/2006 (Schengen Borders Code). According to the regulation, third-country nationals entering the Schengen area will be required to hold a travel document valid for at least three months after the intended date of departure from the territory of the Member States. The requirement will enter into force on 19 July 2013. IATA is currently seeking clarification on the upcoming changes and effective dates with the authorities of individual Schengen Member states. The official date is tomorrow, but it looks like individual countries can set their own dates to enforce the rule. edited to add the regulation document.
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2013:182:0001:0018:EN:PDF

Posted by Michael Schneider
New Paltz, NY
6827 posts

Interesting development. FWIW the German Consulate site hasn't changed/updated the info on their site: "...US citizens in possession of a valid US passport do not need a visa for airport transit, tourist or business trips (for stays up to 90 days). The passport must not expire before the end of the scheduled trip...."

Posted by Ed
Pensacola
7954 posts

It has no bearing since it addresses third-country nationals. The US is an Annex II nation. Understand first; post second. Prevent urban myths.

Posted by Ed
Pensacola
7954 posts

Annex II is part of one of the basic documents that lists the nations that get the easy deal. It's what the big experts posts about all the time - - 90/180, all that's needed is a passport, no real visa, show up, come in, etc. It's mostly nations of North and South America, parts of Asia, etc. These nation have visa exceptions, but, everybody here calls the little entry stamp a visa stamp. Third-country nationals are the rest of the world - - they have to apply for a real visa prior to arrival.

Posted by Ken
Vernon, Canada
17728 posts

Miranda, My interpretation of the regulations in link you provided is that the new rules apply to ALL persons who aren't citizens of the E.U. It doesn't seem to make any distinction or exemptions for the Annex II countries. I don't see this as a big problem. I'll just make sure my Passport is valid for at least three months beyond my expected departure date from the E.U. I'll be getting a 10-year version next time I renew, so that shouldn't be difficult. Cheers!

Posted by Ed
Pensacola
7954 posts

Well, huh. Apparently I was dead wrong. Again.

Posted by Lee
Lakewood, Colorado
11256 posts

Here is what the US State Dept says about Schengen entry. Since the Schengen "visa" is valid for 90 days after entry, it makes sense that your passport would have to be valid for at least the time you could stay in the Schengen zone.

Posted by Ken
Vernon, Canada
17728 posts

@Ed, You're not necessarily wrong. What I posted above is only my interpretation, and I could also be wrong.

Posted by Andre L.
Tilburg, Netherlands
2172 posts

Throughout EU-legalese, "third-country national" usually refers to a citizen of a country other than those of EU (and often also other than Norway, Iceland and Switzerland since they adhere to most provisions of EU on an equal basis).

Posted by Nancy
Corvallis OR
960 posts

US and Canadian passport holders are third-country nationals and according to these new rules now have to have a passport valid for at least 3 months after their scheduled departure date from the Schengen area. It's a wise idea to always renew your passport when it gets close to within 6 months of expiration date just to be safe.

Posted by Jim
Bern, Switzerland
341 posts

Throughout EU-legalese, "third-country national" usually refers to a citizen of a country other than those of EU (and often also other than Norway, Iceland and Switzerland since they adhere to most provisions of EU on an equal basis). Almost... Third country nationals refers to the citizens of all countries that are not a party to a particular EU treaty - so in the case of the Schengen Agreement, citizens of EU states that are not parties to the treaty are technically third counrty citizens too, although since they are also EU citizens they are entitled to free movement in any case.