In Ireland: what do they call the various Euro coins?

I'm traveling to Ireland in a week. Here in US we have dimes, pennies, quarters, etc. And then one, five, ten dollar bills, etc. I believe that Euro bills are simply called 5, 10, 20 Euros, etc. (not "Euro dollars"), but what do they call the coins in Ireland? Are they dimes and nickles like here, or something else? Also, do they have bills for one Euro, or only coins? Best, David

Posted by Frank
Tresana, Highlands Ranch, CO, USA
10883 posts

I have never heard of anything special. Ten is ten, Twenty is twenty. There is no .25 coin. There are one and two Euro coins. By the way, technically there is no plural to Euro. Paper does not go below 5 Euro. Bills are the same 5, 10, 20, 50, 100.

Posted by David
Clinton, WA, USA
15 posts

Maybe I wasn't clear. I want to know what the coins are called. As I said, here in the US we have pennies, nickles, dimes, etc. But what terms do they use for their coin denominations: I believe they have .01, .02, .05, .10, .20. E1, and E2 coins. David.

Posted by David
Clinton, WA, USA
15 posts

Thanks George. From that web site I gather they may be simply called one cent pieces, two cent piece, ten cent piece, etc. Best, David.

Posted by Laura
Virginia, USA
2899 posts

The coins are called "1 cent", "2 cent", "5 cent", etc. i.e., there is no special name for a coin worth 5 cents.

Posted by David
Clinton, WA, USA
15 posts

Okay, so I won't be asking for dimes and quarters while I'm there! Thanks.

Posted by Marco
Oxford, United Kingdom
780 posts

The money is too new to have endearing nicknames ... although in other parts of Europe I understand that some old names may have been transferred over from their previous currencies, but whether these stick now is another matter. American coins are found confusing by some from Europe as they don't have the value on it in numbers (the latest British coin series has the same 'defect'). Not to mention that the dime has 'dime' on it but the nickel has 'five cents'. Still because the biggest value coin in general use is not worth anything to speak of it hardly matters.

Posted by David
Clinton, WA, USA
15 posts

Thanks Marco. I guess that US 'nickle', dime', and 'penny' are more or less slang, which is what prompted me to ask the question. And we won't even get into the Loonies and Toonies they have in Canada! Best, David

Posted by Zoe
Toledo, Ohio, US
2506 posts

.01, .02, .05, .10. .20 and .50 euro are called 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 centimes.

Posted by Ms. Jo
Frankfurt, Germany
4764 posts

Zoe, in what country would that be that euro coins are called centimes?
The OP is asking about Ireland and I am pretty sure they aren't called centimes there. In Germany they are just called cents. 5 cent, 10 cent, etc.

Posted by Andrea
Peterborough, Ontario, Canada
435 posts

I guess that US 'nickle', dime', and 'penny' are more or less slang, which is what prompted me to ask the question. And we won't even get into the Loonies and Toonies they have in Canada! My friend spent a few days in Iceland on her way to Europe. Her husband told her they call their currency "icicles". He said just like we say Loonies and Toonies, they say icicles. She believed him and told everyone she knew and then he finally fessed up he was pulling her leg.

Posted by Nancy
Bloomington, IL, USA
7682 posts

Euro coins aren't called centimes anywhere. They are just cents.

Posted by Bets
Bloomington
1970 posts

I assume Nancy meant they aren't called centimes anywhere in Ireland because that was the question asked by the OP. For clarification, in France and French-speaking Belgium the coins that are a fraction of an Euro are called centimes, just as they were when the French franc was the currency, both old and new francs.

Posted by David
Clinton, WA, USA
15 posts

Okay all, thanks. I have what I need now. They are called cents. Best, David.