101 uses for a ...

A bit of a silly thread here. We all pick up little creative extras along the way and adapt them and make them our own.
Take shower caps, for example. They can be used for a lot more things than just keeping your hair dry in the shower.
Does anyone have any tricks of travel they'd like to share? Any tips on how to get by while on-the-fly?
Anything you've innovatively adapted to be multi-use or multi-purpose?
Let's put on our "thinking caps" and see what we can come up with!

Posted by pat
victoria, Canada
7828 posts

Well, I am not particularily creative, so my tip is pretty lame, but, I love love love ziplock baggies.
I pack socks and undies in a large one, I pack all leakables in smaller ones. I use them to package cookies or whatever snacks I buy while travelling and always have one or two in my purse.

I also use hotel shampoo to wash my clothes with( hey with my colored hair I bring my own shampoo no matter what! LOL) I have also used the hotel shampoos for face wash( marginally better then bar soap when in a pinch) . I have also used hotel conditioner to moisturize skin. Did this in Hawaii when I really dried out, poured it all over me in the shower and then just quickly rinsed it off so I was still a bit slippery but not coated in it. Worked till I got to store next day.
I sometimes remember to bring a few clothes pegs with me for hanging small hand washed items from a hanger to dry.

Posted by Al
Nottingham, UK
658 posts

A minature of brandy in a plastic bottle is useful.

It sterilizes things, it is an antiseptic for cuts and wounds that occur in remote locations and it can be drunk at need and is a good remedy for hysteria and if you're stranded in some remote airport at three in the morning it helps you sleep.

Posted by Brad
Gainesville, VA
7211 posts

I like bringing the rubber jar openers to use as a sink stopper in the bathroom.

I saw another idea I haven't tried yet but really like, using a gallon zip-lock bag as a washing machine. Put a pair of socks and underwear, a small amount of detergent and fill half-way with water. Zip it and shake well. Open, drain, add more water for rinse and repeat as needed.

I also like to bring a chamois to help wring the moisture out of my clothes before I hang dry.

Posted by Ron
southwest, Missouri, U.S.A.
1361 posts

A "Sierra Cup" (big cup made of stainless steel, with a handle), made in the U.S.A., has a capacity of approximatley a half liter of liquid. And a Nuwick candle - 44 Hour (in a can). That can is small : the height of the can is two inches (50 mili meters). the can has a metal lid, the candle is reuseable for a total of 44 hours. Tweezers are included. Tea or coffee can be made in the Sierra cup, above flames of the Nuwick candle. Food can be cooked in the Sierra cup, above the flames of the candle (using three wicks). Water can be heated to boiling temperature in the Sierra cup, above the Nuwick candle, for killing dangerous microbes in the water, and to use the water for cleaning and sterilizing other things. The nuwick candle can be used as a heater for warming the cold air in a room or vehicle. The nuwick candle is not toxic. The nuwick candle would be in baggage that is checked into the airplane's baggage compartment. The Sierra cup can be used as a container for small things.

Posted by Flight Attendant
Niagara Wine Country, Canada
808 posts

I really like the idea of carrying a minature of Brandy to sterilize and as an antiseptic for cuts and wounds!

Maybe I'll just slip one into my Trauma Bag for just those reasons! Then if my Superintendent asks why I have Brandy, I'll explain that it's just another form of antiseptic for treating Casualties in the Field! LOL!

Posted by CL
Salem, Oregon, USA
914 posts

Duct tape. They sell it in "flat" packs now (really) but you can easily make your own (wind around a piece of cardboard). You can repair your bag, mend a fallen hem on your skirt, remove lint/cat hair/etc. from your black pants, and make sturdier handles for the six pack cardboard wine carrier (I speak from experience on the last one). My grandfather mended his slippers with it, but I haven't had to use it for that purpose.

Posted by Melanie
Flagstaff, Az, usa
75 posts

One of my favs is liquid bandage. Not only does it cover and seal cuts without being notice, it can be used like a sealant for torn nylons and if goopy enough can be used as a temporary glue.