Train DB BAHN Savings Fare vs. Standard Fare

I have noticed a substantial difference between fares. I am wondering what the following conditions mean: Special conditions (e.g. use of specific train required, exchange/refund not possible or with extra charge). Is is a bad idea to get the Savings Fare?
I will be traveling from Hamburg to Berlin and then Berlin to Amsterdam returning back to Hamburg.

Posted by Frank
Tresana, Highlands Ranch, CO, USA
13043 posts

It is what is says. Applies to a specific train. If it is the 9:04 am train it is the 9:04 train. "Exchange/refund not possible" means no refund or exchange without an extra charge for the exchange. I think it is pretty clear. What did you think it mean? The saving fare is worth it IF you are willing to commit to that train at that time and understand there are no refunds is you miss the train.

Posted by Lee
Lakewood, Colorado
13146 posts

[]i]"Is is a bad idea to get the Savings Fare? " It's a good idea to get a Savings Fare, if you can commit to a specific day and train. When you book a Savings Fare the connections will be specified, and the ticket will only be valid for the express trains (ICE/IC/EC/IR) specified. If there are regional trains on the schedule, you can actually use any regional train that take that route from midnight (morning) of the date until 10 AM the following day ( Vor- und Nachlauf provision). Also, if you miss a train due to the fault of the Bahn (eg, another specified train being late), you can use the ticket on the next available train. I actually tested this provision (not intentionally) in 2008, when the regional train I was on arrived late, causing me to miss the assigned IC. I went to the ticket counter, the clerk confirmed my late train and assigned me to the next express train (an ICE) to my destination. In most cases, I think, the ticket can be refunded, less €15, up to (before) the day of travel. However, if you were just changing the specified date or train, you could have to pay full fare for the new ticket.

Posted by Stefanie
Los Angeles
3 posts

I'm fine with traveling at the exact time stated. I didn't know that was what they meant by specific train.

Posted by Lee
Lakewood, Colorado
13146 posts

For instance, the 9:25 train from Berlin to Hamburg is ICE 1516. If you click on purchase under Savings Fare on that line, you will buy a ticket which specifies ICE 1516. It would not be valid for the next train, ICE 1596, at 10:17 or any other train. By the way, it you use the "stopover" function, you can write a ticket with a different route or specified pause in an intermediate city. If you go into the "Means of Transport", you could change the train for the second leg to a regional train. That would allow you to spend more time than specified in the stopover city and take any regional train, within the time limit, to your final destination.

Posted by Frank
Tresana, Highlands Ranch, CO, USA
13043 posts

We were using the save fare when we had huge problems with an ice storm. You may not have to go the ticket counter as the conductor may change your ticket for you if he is aware of the situation. The conductors have access to current schedules and all carry wireless device with a printer like an adding machine. We were on a three leg trip which became a five leg trip last winter because of an ice storm. Our first leg came to a stop because of ice on the overhead wires and it was obvious we were going to miss the next conduction. The conductor looked at our tickets, check his machine, punch in some stuff and printed out a new schedule with platform numbers and everything. "Just show the slip to the next conductor." That went OK but added a leg. On the third leg repeat problem with same results. A long day and a four hour train ride turned into a six hour trip but we got there.