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Carnival cruises to resume in August

In your daily dose of "Uh, what?", Carnival has announced that they will resume their cruises in August.

In other news, Carnival Cruise Line's new official motto will be, "What Could Possibly Go Wrong?"

-- Mike Beebe

Posted by
1530 posts

I have to believe the passengers for those early sailings, who presumably purchased their tickets in the innocent age of 2019, will have mixed feelings about this. I would imagine some would prefer to simply get their refund or voucher. (Which may still be possible, I didn't research.)

Posted by
3436 posts

And I am sure the boats will be full.

Posted by
6223 posts

Cruisers gonna cruise....(no matter what)
Cars will now be the main mode of transport to the ports and an escape hatch in case things go wrong. They've removed one perceived barrier out of the equation - flights.

https://www.carnivalcorp.com/node/61301/pdf
"We are taking a measured approach, focusing our return to service on a select number of homeports where we have more significant operations that are easily accessible by car for the majority of our guests."

I wonder what international ports will let passengers disembark.

Posted by
2499 posts

Aside from finding the title of your post in extremely bad taste, your post is inaccurate. Carnival has announced a limited number of cruises to a restricted number of ports, sailing only out if 3 US ports: Miami, Cape Canaveral, and Galveston.

As to how full these ships will sail, only time will tell, but Agnes is not wrong. Many cruisers, (the very avid ones) are chomping at the bit if the threads on Cruise Critic are anything to go by.

Posted by
6380 posts

Would not surprise me to learn that the number of pages of 'fine print' will increase, and not necessarily in favor of the customer.

Posted by
5541 posts

The saga of repatriated cruise ship crews should Carnival resume even limited operations would be an interesting sage. Carnival's ships are foreign flagged ships. Current problem has been getting the healthy crew members off the boats and back to their home countries. Carnival will have to get these crew members back in time to resume in August.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/thousands-cruise-ship-crew-members-remain-out-sea-amid-clash-n1196721

Carnival Cruise Line said it has more than 10,000 healthy crew members
onboard its ships and is planning to have them home to their
respective countries over the next week. About 10,000 crew have
already been repatriated, the company said in a news release.

Posted by
2499 posts

Mike, thank you for editing the title of the thread.
Its interesting to note that to date no ports, outside the US, in the Caribbean or Gulf of Mexico have reopened to cruise ships. So there is no guarantee that any of these cruises will actually sail.

Posted by
1666 posts

My wife and I are independent travelers. We have never been on and don't plan to take a big boat cruise. There's nothing a cruise would offer that would be appealing to us.

Covid 19 has only confirmed our lack of desire to cruise. I thought being stuck on a boat with thousands of people with the trots was scary. Covid 19 raises fear of contagion to an entirely new level. Add to that poor pay and working conditions for the staff and the high pollution rate (cruise ships burn highly polluting unregulated fuel) and I choose not to contribute.

Posted by
5541 posts

Why register a flag of convenience?
Ships registered under flags of convenience can often reduce operating costs or avoid the regulations of the owner's country. To do so, a vessel owner will find a nation with an open registry, or a nation that allows registration of vessels owned by foreign entities. A ship operates under the laws of its flag state, so vessel owners often register in other nations to take advantages of reduced regulation, lower administrative fees, and greater numbers of friendly ports.

https://www.hg.org/legal-articles/what-is-a-flag-of-convenience-31395

Only one NCL flies an American flag.

Posted by
6885 posts

No matter what, a whole segment of the cruising public could be left dockside when the disease flares up again; in March cruisers over 70 with any number of pre-existing conditions, even if mild or under control, were denied boarding. In the long run, they were fortunate.

The doctor's note has been eliminated...for now.