airline food

Hello, I am flying to Italy on a Delta flight and would like to order the meal options that do not have preservatives and include fresh fruit and veggies. Is ordering a Kosher meal the best option? Thanks

Posted by Zoe
Toledo, Ohio, US
2432 posts

Call Delta's customer service and they will explain the options to you.

Posted by Mary
Boston, MA
62 posts

You may want to bring your own food to eat on the plane. Fresh fruit, sandwich, salad, granola bars, nuts, prezels, etc. As long as it is not a liquid (soup, yougurt, dips, juice), you should be able to pass through security.

Posted by Edgar
Medford, OR, USA
229 posts

Hi, Sorry to hear of your dietary issues. Eating airline food is a combination of survival and boredom. That said, you can usually identify the theoretical meal options by checking the airline website. Delta's options are listed in:http://www.delta.com/components/popups/menus/special_meals.jsp The problem will be finding out how these meals are prepared. For example (not being Jewish), I suspect that kosher rules are not updated to address fish farm raised lox. You may need to make your own bento box using organic components.

Posted by Tom
Hüttenfeld, Hessen, Germany
9086 posts

Fly first class perhaps?

Posted by Frank II
USA
4376 posts

If you're looking or fresh fruits and vegetables and no preservatives, bring your own. I would think your best bet would be vegetarian. Kosher food just means the food is kosher. It can contain preservatives. Just read the ingredients on a Hebrew National salami next time you're in the market.

Posted by Pam
Troy, Idaho, USA
468 posts

I flew Delta/KLM to Italy in May and again on Delta to London 3 weeks ago flying back tomorrow. I have ordered the vegan option for the international legs which serve food. The meals have been surprisingly good altho I cant give you an opinion of whether there are preservatives in them or not. It seems as if there was an airline portion of green salad with each of the main entrees and I believe a fruit salad for dessert each time. The entrees have been fairly tasty yet oddly unidentifiable casserole type things. The before landing snack is usually a sandwich with roasted veggies. In spite of what I have been served, I would not characterize them as being filled with fresh fruits and veggies. If you have sensitivities to preservatives I would bring my own food or check to see what food outlets are in your departure airport.

Posted by Harold
New York, NY, USA
2811 posts

I agree with the other replies. A Kosher meal is only guaranteed to be Kosher; it may not have fresh fruit or veggies, and can certainly have preservatives. So, if you know what you want, bring your own food. In addition to the warning about liquids, be aware that any fresh produce brought on the plane from the US must be eaten or must be left on the plane; you are not allowed to bring this into Europe (and, once in Europe, you'll have no problem finding markets selling plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables).

Posted by Marie
San Diego, CA, United States
857 posts

I've been bringing on my own food for 20 years (at least). A coucous salad with lots of fresh herbs, some diced vegies, olive oil and lemon juice hits the sweet spot for me. Just remember your taste buds (along with your sense of smell) suffer mightily when flying so kick up the flavor. I like adding in some dried cranberries and tangy goat cheese for variety. Also grapes and other moist fruits are good to take along (although you must dispose of all fresh fruit, vegies etc. before deplaning or immediately thereafter. I also take an empty thermos and fill it up post security with ice water. No waiting for the flight crew and you can keep hydrated easily.

Posted by Paul
Cedar, IA, USA
2370 posts

As a general note, it is worth pointing out that while airlines offer many meal options, the reality tends to be that a least common denominator is often what you get. As an example, ordering vegetarian means you likely get Vegan, on some flights it may be spiced as well to work as a Hindu meal. Kosher works with a Halal meal. Lactose intolerant or gluten free may double with either of the above, and on and on. My wife, who is vegetarian, but eats dairy and fish (tolerates eggs in prepared foods as well) has come around to just chancing what is offerred. It seems that most airlines now offer as standard a meat option then a meatless pasta option. If you have very specific preferences, I suggest bringing your own, just keep in mind you can't get liquids or "oozey" stuff through security and Airport options may not be less "preserved" than what you get on the plane.

Posted by Gloria
Des Peres, MO, USA
2 posts

Thank you all for your input. It is very helpful. Gloria