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where to get an omelet for breakfast in France?

Pardon my ignorance, but what type of place would one go to in Paris to get an omelet for breakfast? At the hotels in the price range I'm looking at the optional breakfast at the hotel doesn't list omelets; more like bread, coffee, etc. I'm guessing that a boulangerie would restrict itself to bread, restaurants would be closed before lunchtime, and a cafe would be focused on coffee. Having not been to Paris before I'm wondering what type of place one would go to in order to have an omelet for breakfast.

Posted by
1294 posts

I like the omelets at Laduree. Many cafes have their menus posted and you can check to see if they have omelets.

Posted by
346 posts

I believe omelets are generaly served for lunch and dinner in France, not for breakfasts. Breakfasts tend to be croissants, cofee, etc.

Posted by
8647 posts

Every cafe I've ever been to in Paris serves omelets, any time of the day. You can also get croissants and / or bread at a cafe for breakfast with your omelet if you'd like.

Posted by
1822 posts

I would try and focus less on finding things that remind you of home and more on experiencing a new culture. Traveling with that attitude is way more rewarding.

Posted by
8647 posts

Breakfast in America food is good, we ate there many times last summer. It's a greasy American diner.

Posted by
693 posts

John, thanks for asking this question - I like to start my day with some protein, too. And thank you Susan and Frank II for your info! That bottomless cup of coffee at the American Diner sounds really tempting!

Posted by
28801 posts

... or stay at high end American chain hotels with the breakfast buffet and chefs cooking the eggs and omelets. You may not like the bacon if you like it crispy - this is true throughout Europe.

Posted by
517 posts

Can't resist responding. A couple years ago we were in Paris and having the breakfast provided by our hotel: croissants, bread, jam and coffee. A fellow guest (who happened to be American) at the next table was pretty insistent about wanting eggs and sausage and not understanding that it wasn't to be had and wasn't the norm. Do agree with other posters that a little protein should not be hard to find at most cafe´s and also that "Breakfast in America" is a great place. One of the things we miss living in Vienna is the big American breakfast (that and good Mexican food! Although some Mexican places have appeared recently) so we sometimes like to go to Breakfast in America if we are in Paris. Very nice. Have a good trip!

Posted by
380 posts

Try Eggs & Co. in the 6th, 11 rue Bernard Palissy, near Metro stop St. Germain-des-Pres on line #4. www.eggsandco.fr.
For a change instead of ordering an omelet, which is what most Americans order, try "cocottes" which is the traditional French way of baking the eggs and cheese.

Posted by
8841 posts

Going for the protein at breakfast obscures the French practice of a light breakfast but a full meal at lunch, which doesn't take all that long but does satisfy your hunger. Le sandwich is gaining in popularity as more stores and offices in cities go for shorter lunch hours so people can get home earlier after a long commute, but most people will opt for a large plate of food at lunch with or without first course and dessert. That said, more hotels are serving ham slices, cheese, fresh fruit and yogurt on the breakfast buffets to satisfy visitors. On the other hand, you can order an omelet in a brasserie and some cafes any time of day.

Posted by
358 posts

My son who has lived in Paris since 2001 likes the omelets at Breakfast in America.

Posted by
12040 posts

""Umm...isn't the word "omelette" French?" So is the word Crepe which sounds similar to what you are full of. My response to the OP is sincere and something to consider." Some people like to describe what they imagine European culture is like. Others, like James who actually lives in Europe, report on real, modern European lifestyles that cut through all the silly idealized stereotypes. I'll trust the reports of someone who lives in Ansbach over someone in Los Angeles any day. To the OP- I have nothing to add about where to find a good breakfast omelet in France- I have no idea- but if that's what you want to do on your vacation, go for it!

Posted by
8647 posts

Omelets are very much a part of French culture / cuisine. I don't think you can get more French than an omelet. Granted, the French don't eat them for breakfast, but they don't care when you eat them.

Posted by
9110 posts

Here's the summary: Guy 1: Where can I get an omelet? Guy 2: Dunno, but don't eat omlets on account the french don't. Now the plot thickens and along comes Guy 3. Guy 3: Guess, what? Carrefour sells peanut butter and balogna. Guy 2: Dunno, but Carrefour must not be a french store. Meanwhile, Guys and Gals 4 through 97 have suggested good places to get an omlet. Analysis 1: Who has least served Guy 1? Analysis 2: How much knowledge has Guy 2 displayed?

Posted by
815 posts

thank you for the replies. I was not aware that the French didn't consider an omelet typical breakfast fare. Part of why I want to travel more is to get experiences like this, outside of what I have taken for granted at home. It's one thing to know in an abstract sense others do things differently, but it is instructive to see it put in practice in daily life. That's why I've asked a few questions about how we might have what I've assumed to be ordinary French experiences, from sitting in a cafe to eating a typical French breakfast (although as it turns out omelets aren't part of that)

Posted by
8647 posts

My experience from staying with French friends and living in France, is that it is common for the French that I have known to have soft boiled eggs at breakfast, but always French bread with butter and jam, and sometimes croissants. It's becoming more common for French people at home to eat cereal for breakfast. In hotels, they usually serve French bread, croissants, butter, jam and coffee / hot chocolate for breakfast. Most hotels we have stayed at in Paris also have soft boiled eggs if you ask. Hotels that put on more of a spread will also offer yogurts, cold cuts, cheese, cereal and oj. Many times we have gone to a cafe for breakfast in Paris and we have either an omelet or scrambled eggs, plus bread and maybe croissants.

Posted by
815 posts

I should also add that making french-style omelets is one of the lessons in an online cooking school I've been using, so I really want to see how what I've been making compares to the real deal (at an appropriate meal, perhaps lunch, from looking at the info about the Eggs & Co restaurant)

Posted by
3696 posts

Just don't look for those American homefries or hash browns... I was actually surprised on my first trip to Paris to get french fries with my omelet (how naive...I was in France....), and now on a recent trip to Turkey my grandson was pleasantly surprised to find french fries served every day at our hotel breakfast...not what we think of as breakfast potatoes!

Posted by
8841 posts

@Tk Did you eat the Turkish breakfast of olives and feta for breakfast in Turkey, along with the fries? Nothing like an olive in the morning to blast you awake, more than any cup of coffee or juice.