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face clothes

Just got back from a two week stay in Norway. Only one hotel/guest house provided face clothes. Why is that? In America they are always provide.

Posted by
439 posts

They seem not to be provided at a lot of places in Europe. I always take my own.

Posted by
11450 posts

Um,, because things are different in other countries. Just because something is normal or expected in States you can't assume it will be so other places. I know most hotels in Europe don't provide facecloths, they are considered more personal. The large chain hotels( like Hiltons and Marriots) likely do though. Personally I don't use them,, never have , so not a big deal to me. If it matters to you they do have diposable ones in travel stores, they are size of a quarter and your rehydrate them to use. Also people like those micro fiber types and they dry quickly.

Posted by
2638 posts

You can't go to a different country and expect things to be the same. Very few hotels, B&B's, etc., have wash cloths. As Pat said they feel it's a personal item. I can remember only one hotel having face cloths on all our trips to Europe. It's just like a lot of hotels & B&B's do not use a top sheet, they have a comforter only which is great. Europe should not be compared to America.

Posted by
9 posts

I realize that things are different in other country's, I do not expect them to be identical to America. We purposly did not stay at the large chains so we could experience the culture of the country that we were staying in. It is one of the main reasons that I want to travel. I want to experience the different cultures. I was just trying to get an understanding as to, why, face clothes were not provided. As it was stated it is considered a personal item. I brought soap, shampoo, conditioner all personal items that I figured would not be provided at some of the places that we planned on staying. In all the research no place did I or anybody else in our group read that face clothes was considered a personal item and might not be provide. It just caught us off guard. Believe me I will be packing one for future trips.

Posted by
9 posts

I realize that things are different in other country's, I do not expect them to be identical to America. We purposly did not stay at the large chains so we could experience the culture of the country that we were staying in. It is one of the main reasons that I want to travel. I want to experience the different cultures. I was just trying to get an understanding as to, why, face clothes were not provided. As it was stated it is considered a personal item. I brought soap, shampoo, conditioner all personal items that I figured would not be provided at some of the places that we planned on staying. In all the research no place did I or anybody else in our group read that face clothes was considered a personal item and might not be provide. It just caught us off guard. Believe me I will be packing one for future trips.

Posted by
4365 posts

This is funny because for some reason one of the very first things I read, over and over, when I first started reading European guidebooks was Bring A Washcloth LOL! Warning, Will Robinson!!! You're going to a No Washcloth Zone!!! When I got my passport I half-expected to have to sign a disclaimer acknowledging that I had indeed been warned LOL! And guess what? It's true! (and I don't even use them...)

Posted by
356 posts

When I was a student I went to America on a working holiday and worked as a chambermaid at a hotel. I was really surprised that flannels (as we call them) were provided and I absolutely hated having to take the used ones out of the bathrooms each day. I would try not to think about where they had been!

Posted by
8293 posts

Using the corner of a towel as a face cloth always works for me.

Posted by
991 posts

The first time I went to England I wondered why there were no face cloths. I put it down to it being just one of those things that make me love the place and tried to remembered to pack one from then on. If I forgot I could always use it as an excuse for more shopping.

Posted by
11450 posts

There are no face clothes because faces like to be naked,, sorry couldn't resist that one.

Posted by
14449 posts

Okay, I give up. Where would a washcloth be that a towel would not be? Washcloths seem to be a rarety in Europe, even in the 5-star hotels. They were provided in Beijing, New Zealand and Australia, though.

Posted by
102 posts

As a euro myself, I never saw them till I went to America. I have never used one and I do not see the point. I do get the term wash cloth but why do some people call it a face cloth? This is just one cultural difference just like the different beds and bedding types you see in different countries.

Posted by
629 posts

No better shave than after I've had a steaming hot face cloth on my face for a few minutes. Of course using part of a hand towel works too! When in Rome......

Posted by
11798 posts

The best reason I've heard is that most of Europe considers a wash cloth a personal item. We don't pack wash cloths but my wife likes to bring a daily face cleaning product by "oil of old lady". They are a single use paper product that you wet then use to clean your face.

Posted by
1784 posts

We too have finally learned that washcloths (that's what we call them) are rarely provided in Europe and now always pack one. I hardly think Becky is issuing a blanket condemnation of European hygiene. For the record, in Japan it is practically de rigueur that hotels offer toothbrushes , but your sushi could swim again before you find a napkin in a restuarant. The solution apparently is that many Japanese carry a washcloth. Hmmm, maybe that's where they all went...

Posted by
8410 posts

I remember reading the No Washcloth In Europe info when I was researching my first trip. In a recent thread about the difference between Euro showers (hand-held sprayer) and North American showers (stationary head) someone had a theory that in Europe they don't need washcloths because they can direct the shower spray where it is needed (is that delicate enough?), where here, the washcloth can provide assistance with the rinsing. I don't usually use a washcloth (TMI?), but I do take one with me so I can wipe my feet without getting a towel dirty.

Posted by
95 posts

Face cloths are not used so much now that the disposable make-up removal wipes are so popular with the younger throw away generation. I still use face cloths and always take my two shabbiest ones dump them in the hotel wastepaper bin at the end of the holiday.

Posted by
10344 posts

The spelling of the title of this topic got my attention from the first day it was published - I thought, "face clothes", is that a new phrase and what does it mean? I wasn't aware there were clothes for the face. Then I finally realized what was meant was "face cloths."

Posted by
780 posts

My british husband says Face cloths are a personal item, called a "flannel" in europe usually and isn't usually shared, much like a toothbrush, underwear, etc. So it would be like expecting a hotel to provide you a toothbrush and undies.

Posted by
7974 posts

Not to gross anyone out too much, but having seen what the laundry in a hotel looks like, you would be amazed and shocked at what some people do with those wash cloths. Calling them a face cloth is a misnomer. Even though I know they are being washed in boiling hot water and disinfected, it still is rather disgusting..... My recommendation is to bring your own.

Posted by
3 posts

Cheap baby wash cloths from discount store work great, dry overnight. Store in a small ziplock bag.

Posted by
241 posts

Washcloths (facecloths in uk) are not a big thing. They used to be used until the early 1970s. They went out with sheets and counterpains (? spelling) and duvets came in. Just little differences between usa and Europe! As you take washcloths to Europe a lot of us take uk tea to USA!!

Posted by
484 posts

3M micro fiber dish cloths work great. Extremely light weight,dry quickly and inexpensive.

Posted by
356 posts

Jo - that was what I was referring to in my earlier comment! I worked in a US hotel for a while and the stains on the face cloths each morning suggested people were not using them on their faces. I was constantly having to wash my hands. I would much rather people bought their own!

Posted by
875 posts

It is my understanding that they consider washcloths very personal items, like toothbrushes, which you wouldn't wash out and then put out for the next person to use. Makes sense from that context I always just bring my own.

Posted by
875 posts

It is my understanding that they consider washcloths very personal items, like toothbrushes, which you wouldn't wash out and then put out for the next person to use. Makes sense from that context I always just bring my own.

Posted by
10344 posts

I didn't even know faces needed clothes. Why don't they tell me this stuff?!

Posted by
1829 posts

Kent - my grandmother and mother used to use flannels (face cloths) to give our faces a quick clean up before going out or company arriving. AKA " a lick and a promise". They used sponges when bathing us.

Posted by
103 posts

Would like to recommend using washclothes made for babies (found next bottles and blankets and such). These are incredibly soft and very thin so they dry super quick.

Posted by
11450 posts

Kent,, I already answered that one,, faces like being "nakity" ! LOL

Posted by
11450 posts

I think if one must have a face cloth,, then the baby ones are the best idea. They are small, wash and dry quickly, and you can throw them away after a few days rather then washing them. Most of them are sold in packs of 4, 6 , or 12,, and are cheap, you can pack them into any little crevice so they take almost no room either. Good idea Melanie.

Posted by
94 posts

In our Paris apartment, they had wash mitts (which I also saw for sale in stores). I took a polishing cloth I bought at Marshalls in Chicago. It's nylon and dries very quickly. They don't harbor bacteria and work beautifully with bodywash. I also packed Oil of Olay disposable makeup remover clothes.

Posted by
18055 posts

When I first went to Germany, and found that washcloths and soap were not provided, I thought it was just like our hotels do not provide toothbrushes. Then I found that European do not use them, because the feel that they are unsanitary. They prefer to use their hands to wash certain body parts. Remember that next time a Frenchman offers to shake hands (do you know where it's been?). . . . . . . ¶ And, BTW, I alway bring my own, soap too.