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Traveling with sauces/honey/jams

I'm flying out of Dubrovnik tomorrow to London (layover in Split). I'm staying in London for the day and then on Sunday have a direct flight back home. I need to know if I'm allowed to take the subjects in question with me in my carry on or do they have to be checked (they are a little heavy). My question is for both flight situations. Thank you.

Posted by
11613 posts

Fluids over 3 oz. total have to be checked. I had to check a bag from CDG to Detroit because I brought back mustard. Lots of mustard.

Posted by
2794 posts

Zoe has it right. If they're over 3oz. each and you don't want them to be confiscated you have to put them in your checked baggage.

Posted by
1915 posts

Note that this may also include fluids purchased in "duty-free" shops. On the last trip from Europe, we purchased some items in Europe in a "duty-free" shop (a bottle of whiskey, sealed). When I arrived in Canada, I was told it could not be carried on, AFTER I had checked all items. I would have had to pay an additional fee to check the item purchased in a "duty-free" shop!! I was outraged. Luckily, I was able to persuade an airline employee to allow me to check a carry-on item without a fee (probably would not happen today). So, do NOT assume that "duty-free" items purchased on one leg of a trip can be carried on for further legs. And this was apparently quite common in this Canadian port of entry, in which many many many items were confiscated from bamboozled travelers, and apparently taken as plunder by the TSA personnel.

Posted by
23402 posts

apparently quite common in this Canadian port of entry, in which many many many items were confiscated from bamboozled travelers, and apparently taken as plunder by the TSA personnel. apparently does not equal fact. May be fact. May not be. A couple of times for "apparently". I didn't know TSA camp out in Canadian airports.

Posted by
26 posts

I had orange marmalade confiscated in the Madrid airport. Who know that it qualified as a liquid!

Posted by
11153 posts

If it pours out of a container, it's considered a liquid, so jams, sauces, and honey are all "liquids" for security purposes. So, any time you have to go through security, they will have to be checked (even if, as in the example above, they were bought after security and so were OK to carry on a first flight, if you have to go through security on a second flight, they must be shifted to your checked bags, or they'll be confiscated). "I didn't know TSA camp out in Canadian airports." They do. Canadian airports do "preclearance," whereby you go through US immigration and customs in Canada before boarding the plane to the US. Your arrival in the US is thus like a domestic flight arrival. For instance, flights from Canada can arrive at LaGuardia Airport, which has no customs or immigration. These flights are called "transborder," and leave from a separate section of the Canadian airport than either "domestic" or "international." The preclearance system is being expanded (Dublin and Shannon airports now have it). Some more details in this New York Times article: http://tinyurl.com/a8u88ay

Posted by
1915 posts

And the truly truly aggravating thing about the arrangement of the TSA location is that you first check your luggage, and then you see the sign about the fluids, even those that you purchased in "duty-free". It is beyond comprehension that this could be accidental, since traveler after traveler was having this problem, and some were very very irate. It's one of those things which makes people become anti-government, since even a simple-minded idiot would understand that must warn people about something while they can still do something about it. And, no, you could not get your luggage back. You could not go back there. I had to wait about 1 hour, and almost missed my flight.

Posted by
1067 posts

Canadian airports do "preclearance," whereby you go through US immigration and customs in Canada before boarding the plane to the US. Your arrival in the US is thus like a domestic flight arrival. Yes and no. It depends on the terminal (at least at Pearson). I flew Air Canada to Florida, and had to do the pre-clearance. Next time I flew WestJet (yuck) to Florida from a different terminal and there was none, it was all done in the States.

Posted by
559 posts

Thanks all. I put them in my checked bag and wasn't overweight :-)

Posted by
11153 posts

@Andrea: Thanks for that clarification - good to know! I've flown to the US from Toronto (but years ago when they only had two terminals), Montreal, Vancouver, Calgary, and Ottawa, and have always had preclearance, so I didn't know that it was not used at all terminals at YYZ. I can also say that I flew from Calgary to Newark on Westjet in May 2013, and it was fine (and I appreciated not having to pay for a checked bag).

Posted by
1164 posts

Everyone should know by now that you cannot carry more than 3oz of liquid through a TSA checkpoint no matter where you bought it.

Posted by
1915 posts

The point about knowing or not knowing about the liquids is irrelevant. When you are traveling, you often do not know when you will go in or out of security. When we returned from Europe, we went through security in Europe and then bought the whiskey. Then when we got to Toronto, we had to go through security again, which is very different than changing planes in the US. In the US, as long as you do not go outside of the security zone, you are not reinspected. But this was not the case when changing planes on the return from Europe. There, we did not go out of the security zone, but had to be reinspected anyway for some reason unknown to me. Thus, the issue is not whether people know, but that rules are not always the same in different situations. And again as I noted, this was a big surprise for traveler after traveler.