Getting from Budapest to Slovenia

I'm a woman needing to get from Budapest to Murska Sobota, Slovenia in late September the easiest(and most economical)way with my 75 year old mother. I've driven in Slovenia, Croatia, Austria & Germany but feel hesitant driving in Hungary. Should I be concerned? Also because we would be dropping the car off in Graz, Austria the drop-off fee is as much as as the car rental for 4 days. If we could get close to the Slovenian border we could arrange to be picked up and then rent a car in Slovenia. Many thanks

Posted by Ilja
Seattle
1464 posts

I did not see significant difference between driving in Hungary and the countries you named. If you just want to get from Budapest to Murska Sobota and not to do much sightseeing on the way, the train would be a better choice. The fastest connection with two changes is: Depart Budapest-Deli at 10:25, arrive at Zalaegerszeg at 13:56, depart Z. at 14:55, arrive at Hodos 15:45, depart H. at 15:55, arrive M.S. 16:25.

Posted by Paul
Sioux Falls, SD, USA
214 posts

We have driven in Hungary, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia, Czech Republic, Croatia, Switzerland, and France. While years ago in communist times, things might have been complicated. Today, it's easy, very easy (as our Budapest host often said). Autobahns link most big cities. Small roads run off those. The signs are pretty much self-evident. There are gas stations all over. You must buy the vineigt in each country, but this was quite easy. Most gas stations sell them, and English is the lingua franca of Europe, you lucky ducky. We drove from Budapest to Zagreb, drove all over Croatia, and never were concerned about anything except some other drivers on side roads are a little impatient.

Posted by Paul
Sioux Falls, SD, USA
214 posts

We have driven in Hungary, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia, Czech Republic, Croatia, Switzerland, and France. While years ago in communist times, things might have been complicated. Today, it's easy, very easy (as our Budapest host often said). Autobahns link most big cities. Small roads run off those. The signs are pretty much self-evident. There are gas stations all over. You must buy the vineigt in each country, but this was quite easy. Most gas stations sell them, and English is the lingua franca of Europe, you lucky ducky. We drove from Budapest to Zagreb, drove all over Croatia, and never were concerned about anything except some other drivers on side roads are a little impatient.