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Another Question: Canada or Mexico?

Some on here seem to be well-traveled. I haven't done a lot of traveling due to finances (Teacher in America; taught in NC for 11 years making just $30-$40K a year; now teach in GA; salary is much better; make over $60K a year).

I know this is a Europe forum so apologies. Previously I posted a Spain vs. Mexico question.

If I didn't go to Spain and chose between Canada or Mexico (short trip of 8-9 days), which would you choose? Why? Pros and cons of each?

Thank you ahead of time. If we were to go to Canada, would want to see Quebec City and Montreal, Toronto not so much. But I may book a tour with tour radar.

Posted by
2743 posts

When would this trip occur? If it is any time in the next 6 months I would suggest that you might find it difficult to visit Canada. Our borders are closed to US tourists, and will remain so for some time to come, I believe.

Since your previous thread concerned Hispanic countries, then perhaps Mexico would hold more that currently interests you?

Your thread more properly belongs on the "Beyond Europe" subforum.

Posted by
1649 posts

Depends.

But personally I’d pick Mexico. But I really like “ruins” and have enjoyed visiting the Maya ruins in Mexico

Posted by
173 posts

Mexico is more welcoming to visitors at this time. Canada is a beautiful country to visit but it is not possible to visit now. Eastern Canada is well worth a visit when it opens to Americans.

Posted by
1512 posts

In that previous question you mentioned an interest in colonial architecture and history, iirc,
so I was going to mention that if you have time and budget limits maybe you should consider
taking your trip to St. Augustine in Florida, and to look at it through a colonial lens -
you could do the same thing with several areas along the Gulf Coast,
by digging beneath the surface a little bit and uncovering the Spanish and French colonial foundations --
after all, it isn't really true that we (USA / WASPs) stole this land from the original inhabitants
because it was the Spanish and the French who did the original muscling out of the way, and then 'we' took it from there.
St. Augustine and the surrounding area plus a little bit of Caribbean colonial touring would be a great vacation.

Posted by
1836 posts

If this is to be a summer trip then Canada would be the better choice I think. Mexico would be great in the winter but the summers can be punishingly hot and humid.
All of Atlantic Canada is beautiful. If you'll have a car you might consider a short excursion from Quebec City up around the Gaspe Peninsula. There are some very pretty Provincial Parks there and the area in general is absolutely gorgeous - one of Canada's better kept secrets in fact.
Mexico would be easier on your pocketbook - prices will be cheaper in general, plus the dollar to peso exchange rate at the moment is very favorable indeed.

Posted by
2928 posts

Robert beat me to it, but if you want a taste of Europe without the long flight, Quebec and Quebec City are very much worth visiting. Canada or Mexico; depends on what you ultimately decide you want to do and it seems you’re not completely sure yet.

Posted by
753 posts

Mexico is in the process of becoming this centuries Columbia; a narco-republic. The State Dept warnings are enough to keep me out at this point. With tourists disappearing, being held for ransom, robbed, murdered, etc while the police and judicial system have, if anything, become even more corrupt since the 1970's (when every college kid in the Southwest knew enough to keep an extra $20 to pay off the inevitable traffic cop south of the boarder) I cannot recommend it. And that's too bad, because it used to be a great cheap vacation.

Canada, on the other hand, is one of my favorite places for a long weekend, especially Vancouver (which is a 3 hour drive for me). The dollar is strong, so you get that discount, the people speak English (even those who just migrated into the country), the food and culture are fantastic. Unfortunately the boarder is closed, and at the present time I wouldn't bet on it opening before summer.

Eastern Canada has some interesting history, much of it tied to the rise of the United States, and is very European in comparison due to the longer French and English control over the region. The Western half has some fantastic cultural landmarks, but the First Nation peoples are often overlooked by tourists.

If you like cities Eastern Canada is a good choice, if you prefer scenery and wide open choices go west. If you want quaint fishing villages on rocky shores there's Nova Scotia, Whales and Salmon and totem poles in the fog? Head for B.C.

Posted by
1836 posts

While there are a number of places in Mexico that I'd avoid for all of the reasons cited by KGC above, I wouldn't necessarily lump Central Mexico and Mexico City into that category. In the course of half a dozen trips to San Miguel and the old silver mining villages nearby we've always felt safe and secure, and our overall experiences in that part of Mexico have been nothing but positive.
As is the case with any travel destination these days a bit of due-diligence is recommended before leaving home, but as is also the case with most travel destinations a healthy amout of individual caution and common sense goes a long way.
Just my 2 cents ...

Posted by
279 posts

They are both large countries with a variety of sights and experiences, so it really depends on what draws you. Either can make a great 8-9 day trip from the U.S.

Montreal, Quebec and nearby areas would make an excellent trip. We have also enjoyed two trips to Vancouver/Victoria and a trip on the Rocky Mountaineer from Vancouver to Banff and Jasper in the Canadian Rockies.

We spent a week in Mexico City and Puebla in March 2019 and a week in the Yucatan (Merida, Chichen Itza, Playa Del Carmen) some years ago. Both were great. Our next Mexico trip will probably be to San Miguel de Allende and Guanajuato.

Advantages of Canada: It's easier and might be more comfortable if you aren't an experienced traveller, and can be better for travel in Summer. However, some parts of Mexico are high in the mountains and are pleasant year-round. Advantages of Mexico: It feels more exotic and the Mayan and other ancient sites are impressive.

They are so different, it just really depends what kind of experience you hope to have. If you post more about what you are looking for, people will be able to provide more advice.

Posted by
753 posts

FYI, direct from the Department of State website:

Travel Advisory
September 8, 2020Mexico - Level 3: Reconsider Travel
KHC
Reconsider travel to Mexico due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime and kidnapping. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Mexico due to COVID-19.

Mexico has lifted stay at home orders in some areas and resumed some transportation and business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Mexico.

Do Not Travel To:

Colima state due to crime.
Guerrero state due to crime.
Michoacán state due to crime.
Sinaloa state due to crime.
Tamaulipas state due to crime and kidnapping.

Reconsider Travel To:

Chihuahua state due to crime.
Coahuila state due to crime.
Durango state due to crime.
Jalisco state due to crime.
Mexico state due to crime.
Morelos state due to crime.
Nayarit state due to crime.
Nuevo Leon state due to crime.
San Luis Potosi state due to crime.
Sonora state due to crime.
Zacatecas state due to crime.
For detailed information on all states in Mexico, please see below.

Posted by
1836 posts

The Colonial Highlands area of Central Mexico consists primarily of the states of Guanajuato and Queretaro, two of the 16 states within Mexico which are excluded from the Dept. of State Travel Advisory.
Any future travel plans of course need to be predicated on the relaxation of COVID restrictions once an effective vaccine has become widely available.

Posted by
1378 posts

It's amazing to me how many people who have probably never been to Mexico have strong opinions about why they would never come here and why others shouldn't either.

Mexico is a large country. Not as big as Canada or the US, but still big and varied. And just as is true of Canada and the US (and every other large country in the world), there are areas worth visiting and areas not so much.

Mexico City is one of the most magnificent cities I have ever visited. The centro histórico is packed with spectacular architecture and great museums, and some of the best restaurants anywhere. I live near Guadalajara, which is also a great city to visit.

You should also look at the 121 Pueblos Mágicos (magical towns) around Mexico. The process for being named a Pueblo Mágico is very rigorous, so those on the list are really special. I've been to a few, and have been blown away by the charm, the history, the friendliness of the people, the scenery, and the excellent restaurants. (Word is that my town, Ajijic, is about to be named a Pueblo Mágico.)

Weather in Mexico is also diverse. There are parts of Mexico that are at altitude and have very moderate, comfortable temperatures year round (though the sun is very strong, so appropriate sun-protection is warranted wherever you go). I went to Puerto Vallarta last November, and it was unbearably hot and humid, but where I live, average temps in November are in the mid-70s, with low humidity, sunny skies and pleasant breezes. Our hottest weather is in May; our rainy season is from June to September, when everything turns green.

Mexico has more than its share of problems, but tourists come here and experienced few problems. I am eagerly looking forward to exploring more of this beautiful country once the pandemic is a thing of the past.

I love Canada too. I've visited 8 provinces and saw many places worth visiting in all of them (except Manitoba).

Posted by
1649 posts

For anyone who lives in the United States to call out another country for having a high crime rate is just hysterical. Trust me I’ve been to Mexico it’s a lot safer than the United States. Heck in the United States you can get shot for knocking on the door if it’s night and you don’t have the right skin color.

Based on what I’ve read about Seattle, if you’re that terrified of Mexico I don’t think you can leave your home. If the state department issued warnings for the United States, it would say don’t go.

Posted by
4169 posts

So many destination considerations! Is Spring Break a possible time for your 8-9 day trip, or would this be happening during Summer Vacation, or at Christmas? A long, long time ago, I went on Mexico trips in two consecutive years, led by one of the Spanish teachers in junior high during Spring Break. We stayed in Interior locations, not Acapulco or other beach places. Weather was fantastic. Mexico would allow you to use your Spanish. Would a French-Canadian trip be more “exotic?”

You’ve gotten a lot of responses here already, but the Rick Steves Forum also has a “Beyond Europe” category, and you might possibly get additional replies if you reposted this question there, rather than the Spain category.

Posted by
6515 posts

Comparing Mexico to Canada - two huge countries - is like comparing apples and oranges. Depending on where you go, you'll get a vastly different experience. In general, Mexico is much more laid back and the exchange rate is much better than Canada, so your money will go a lot further. It's totally possible to get a wonderful, clean, unique lodging in say, a Pueblo Magico like Vallodolid (colonial character, mostly local and not highly touristed) for < $60-70 per night (this is an example of where I stayed: Casa Quetzal Boutique Hotel - https://www.booking.com/hotel/mx/casa-quetzal.html). In comparison, Quebec City and Montreal are considerably more expensive, especially if you stay within the fortified walls of Quebec City (which isn't a "must" by the way). I have been to all 3 multiple times and I track my spending, so I am fairly confident in saying that Quebec City is most expensive, followed by Montreal, and then Mexico (my experience is mostly in the Yucatan peninsula in non all-inclusive properties and mostly colonial towns like Merida, Vallodolid, Izamal, etc). If budget is not as much of an issue, then you can have a wonderful time in Canada as well. The architecture and the language will be different - both cities feel very French and the language and cuisine and everything else will reflect that.

To say there is no crime in Mexico or that's it's super safe everywhere is obviously farcical, but I've been going to the Yucatan every other year with no issue. Quintana Roo is not on the State Department list and frankly I don't worry about anything there. I don't rent a car or guzzle drinks in all-inclusive or get drunk or put myself in stupid situations, so every trip goes smoothly. I travel with a good female friend and we both feel comfortable there - we get around by bus (to go from Cancun to the colonial towns) and it works fine. Since you speak Spanish, that will be super helpful in dealing with people. One aspect of (Caribbean) Mexico that is unbeatable in Canada are the beaches and the warm water. And the Myan temples and jungle/ lush environment, which are both very unique. Having said that, I was not comfortable in going this year because I've been following how well they've dealt with COVID....and the answer is "not well at all". So beware when people say it's a welcoming place or that it's "open". It's only open because it's a poor country whose people in some locations rely desperately on tourism, in person commerce (small stores and open markets everywhere where people come together and intermix) and cannot easily socially distance (Cancun was built on tourism, it was an undeveloped poor fishing village before then). I will return only once COVID is in the back mirror and no sooner. So read up on Mexico first before committing to it and make sure you're comfortable going there (hint: they have the 4th highest deaths in the world and they do hardly any testing, so it's going to be a long slog): https://apnews.com/article/health-coronavirus-pandemic-mexico-a9bcc45f461ec39f6ae45d1fdcf7c1af

Posted by
12141 posts

In the winter I prefer apples so i would go to the beach in Mexico. Any of the big tourist cities would work well. You might look a little further afield like Belize or Costa Rica. In the summer it is definitely Oranges; so Canada. I have no idea about the Canadian border but Mexico is open by flight.

Posted by
1836 posts

Regarding Canada: Unless you have your hearts absolutely set on Quebec and Montreal, you could fly into Halifax and use that as a base for exploring another one of the prettiest parts of Atlantic Canada. The city itself is a great place to explore for a few days - lots of history, including some American history, in the area ... it's where a large contingent of British Loyalists were transported at the end of the Revolutionary War.
The Cape Breton peninsula is only a short drive away. Cape Breton Highlands National Park is a particular highlight, and the scenery in general is universally glorious.
Alternatively (or maybe in addition) there's Prince Edward Island and all of the natural attractions there.

If you wanted to get a brief taste of both worlds you could consider an open jaw or muli-destination flight plan, ie flying into Halifax from Atlanta and then flying home from Montreal or Quebec (or the reverse). There are cheap one-way flights connecting Halifax and either Montreal or Quebec - probably better use of your time rather than trying to drive it.

However you elect to organize your trip, you might want to research multi-destination flight plans and see if one might make the best use of your limited time. In Mexico for example, flying into Mexico City and home from Guanajuato (the airport that services SMA) would save you at least a half day's backtracking.

Posted by
3062 posts

Dear OP,

As a fellow teacher, I feel your pain. Time off, but unpaid and only in summer, and a salary that is low for a professional. I will say that a lawsuit in Washington State forced our legislature into action and teachers here now make a fair salary.

I think you should plan for what you really want. If you want Europe, then plan and save for Europe. It might take an extra year, but I’m not sure that aiming for 2022 isn’t a bad idea all things considered. Start by simply putting aside a set amount each month for future travel and thinking about what really interests you.

I also want to mention the National Endowment for the Humanities summer programs for teachers. I think they are on “hold” for this summer, but you can browse through past offerings on their websites.
They have the landmarks of American History program here in the US as well as seminars in various international locations. Teachers are granted stipends to participate in the programs. I participated in a week long class in Philadelphia one year on Ben Franklin. It was extremely well done, a lot of fun, and almost completely underwritten by the stipend.

Everyone starts the travel adventure in different ways, but be warned, it is highly addictive.

PS: I am retiring at the end of this school year and plan to complete a decades old travel dream, a trip in September.....

Posted by
6996 posts

Another Question: Canada or Mexico?

What time of the year?

Posted by
1512 posts

Robert's comments above about Loyalists re-located at the end of the Atlantic colonial separation from England in 1783 is particularly timely since Evacuation Day was this past week -- that was the annual late-November holiday celebrated by states in the USA until it was superseded in 1870 by Pres. Grant setting the celebration of American Thanksgiving on the 4th Thursday.
On Evacuation Day the continental army under George Washington held a victory march in Manhattan as the Royal Navy and the Army evacuated. Terms of the Treaty of Paris included returning the Patriots' (ha!) human property / slaves to them, but the Navy instead settled many Tory Blacks up there in Canada and down in Florida. Some also moved to London.

Posted by
6515 posts

For anyone who lives in the United States to call out another country
for having a high crime rate is just hysterical. Trust me I’ve been to
Mexico it’s a lot safer than the United States.

The data doesn't support that, nor is it hysterical:
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-violence-murders-idUSKBN1ZK07C
https://www.businessinsider.com/mexicos-homicides-on-track-for-deadliest-year-on-record-2020-7

As a tourist, you'd have to be very unlucky and at the wrong place, wrong time to get caught up in this kind of thing. It doesn't stop me from traveling to the Yucatan since it's rather far off and isolated from the drug cartel activity, but making unrealistic statements about the crime rate in Mexico doesn't inform anyone either. It's a known that Obrador ("Amlo") was supposed to put a dent in the violence which seems intractable and everyone is tired of. (https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/03/01/mexicos-old-school-war-on-crime-gets-a-surprising-new-champion/)

Don't get me wrong, Mexico is a wonderful, varied country to visit and full of kind people and laid back attitude, but that is one factor (along with the corruption and poverty) that distinguishes it from Canada.

Posted by
1512 posts

We need Emma to remind us, as she does best, about the dangers of generalizations about now.

In her absence, let me point out that statistical info and generalizations have nearly zero value when planning out the specifics of your travel itinerary.

If you come out of a hit musical in Leicester Square, like Hairspray or The Book of Mormon, and get turned around on your way to the underground entrance for the Picadilly Line, you're going to be in a lot more danger than if you were strolling in the Polanco at the equivalent hour! In that situation, London is much scarier than Mexico City.

Personally, after midnight on Revolucion in Tijuana would be a lot more welcoming than the same time in Sandwich Town in Windsor.

Also: https://sphg.co.uk/london-safety-9-useful-travel-safety-tips-for-your-next-trip/

Posted by
6515 posts

@Carlos - sure it's relevant, but people who want to travel no matter what will continue to hang their hat on the "but it's open and I'm welcomed" defense - the CDC has been saying to avoid non-essential travel for a long time, to no avail. Sure, Mexico is "open" and tourist cash is always welcome when people are struggling badly, but the virus gonna virus in Mexico too. I love going to Mexico and would have gone this November, but they are doing poorly with Covid and too many people work and live in dense conditions where they cannot socially distance (nor can their government afford to subsidize them to stay home) and there's no way to spin that. I read they are planning to buy/use Russia's vaccine which doesn't make me feel that much better (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-russia-mexico/russias-rdif-to-sell-32-mln-covid-19-vaccine-doses-to-mexican-firm-idUKKBN2601BS).

Posted by
12141 posts

"but it's open and I'm welcomed" defense

Well, its more of a fact than a defense. There is no need for any defense if you follow the laws. I figure there are 3 issues; 1) do they want you, 2) what is your personal risk and 3) am I willing to take the steps necessary to ensure that I don't bring something home and spread it around. 1) is easy. The destination weighs things like poverty, hunger, homelessness, bankruptcy against the risks and detriments of COVID and makes an informed decision for what is in the best interest of their country. 2) is a personal decision, possibly regretted .... or not. 3) is something we know how to do. Quarantine, test, quarantine, test, mask, distance.

The CDC says one thing, but the US and state governments do something different. Even the State Department uses different language "reconsider". The government could step in and close the borders, that would send an unmistakable message. Some states have to some degree (Hawaii for instance) and I think that's a wonderful illustration of consistent message and local control.

I live very near Mexico. Not a place I would want to go right now; I don't trust their ability to maintain the correct protocols. But that might just be a personal bias. Look at the Caribbean islands. A number are open and doing fairly well. I have friends in Jamaica right now.

Posted by
1996 posts

James you must realise that controlling an epidemiological outbreak on a small island is much easier than a big diverse country with the second largest city in the western hemisphere.

Also do not assume that governments are always acting in the best interests of the people. For example in Spain our government caved to the tourism industry and rushed to open up our country to foreign tourism over the summer, and now look what harm that has done. I agree with Agnes here, do not assume that "because it's open I must be welcomed".

Posted by
12141 posts

I do realize that. Thats why I have more confidence in the decision making processes of locals than I do armchair .... whatevers .... on a travel forum. As for Spain, I would suppose the Spanish government will do a better job than some edict from the EU. But, I don't pretend to know. All I can do as an outsider is respect their choices.

Posted by
4610 posts

I love both countries. They are very different and not just the climate.

Another poster warned you about travel to certain areas of Mexico. Be sure that when you plan a trip to consider the risks.

From what I have read Mexico City is safe, if you stay out of some areas. The tourist areas are generally safe.
The pyramids of Teotihuacan are great, don't miss them. Also, the Archaeological Museum and Chapultepec Castle.
Cabo San Lucas is relatively safe. Cancun once was safe, not sure today. Puerta Vallarta is probably safe.

https://www.travelingbackintime.com/teotihuacan-pyramids-mexico-city/

As for Canada, no problems with safety, just avoid Winter.
Vancouver is nice, loved the Canadian Rockies (Banff, Jasper, Lake Louise). Montreal and Quebec City are nice because of the French Canadian cuisine and culture. Ottawa the capitol is worth a day visit. Niagara Falls is worth a visit.

Do some research and go where you want. Mexico will be cheaper, but not in a huge way.

Posted by
553 posts

I do agree that Canada is "supposed to" be safer than Mexico. Take crime statistics with a grain of salt. Crime statistics are for a whole city or a whole country. Crime statistics don't tell you whether you could safely travel to specific museums, monuments, or other sights that would be of interest to you as a tourist. Analogies are not persuasive but for comparison lets consider that city of Detroit is supposed to be so dangerous. Most of the crime is in the ghetto gang-controlled residential neighborhoods; I have visited multiple places in Detroit, some even with my travel-phobic mother: the Detroit Institute of Art, the Detroit Historical museum, Bell Isle Park, Riverwalk park and adjacent Hart plaza, the Detroit Jazz festival, the sports venues, the Fox and Fisher theaters, and possibly other sights I am not thinking of now. For the record I did not grow up in the city of Detroit; I don't live in Detroit now. My apartment is in a city-small suburb just north of Detroit. I typically don't pay much attention to news and I am vaguely aware that my city-suburb has a certain amount of theft and vandalism of cars, in addition to infrequent shootings and armed robberies, human trafficking and prostitution in the motels, and so on.

My parents took me to Canada twice when I was a kid. Both times we went to Toronto and Niagra Falls. I went to Montreal as an adult, alone, but at the time I wrongly believed I could only travel to one city per trip. I have never been to Mexico. When I was about 12, my grandparents on my dad's side took my 3 first cousins on my dad's side to Mexico. I remember overhearing a conversation about this before the trip, about how my grandparents were offering to take me to Mexico and how my mother would not allow it. It is a struggle for me to acquiesce to the fact that my mother's phobias and anxieties are not necessarily an accurate reflection of objective reality and/or risks.

I suggest you see what guidebooks about Canada and Mexico you can borrow from your local library. Yeah it is helpful to buy one or more up-to date guidebooks before you travel, but for now any books up to 25 years old will still give you a rough idea of whether Mexican or Canadian history and culture is more appealing to you, which sites and cities you would want to see, and so on. Type yourself some rough itineraries and maybe post something else in the beyond Europe section, and then we might have a better idea of how safe your supposed trips sound.

Are you looking for answers about safety, costs, and/or which country is more appealing in terms of sights and history/culture?

Posted by
6515 posts

Wait until Mexico gets the pandemic under control, they are a struggling developing country not comparable to Canada on many metrics.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/nathanielparishflannery/2020/12/03/why-is-mexico-failing-to-confront-the-covid-19-pandemic/?sh=ba19ff717cd6
https://www.cnn.com/2020/12/18/americas/mexico-city-covid-19-measures-intl/index.html

Their vaccination effort will commence after ours, and there is plenty of corruption that should make one pause as to when the country will be "done" with the pandemic. As far as crime goes, Mexico has cartel/ gang types of crimes (including thousands of disappearances (students, etc), kidnappings, and some very grisly crimes) that simply don't exist in Canada, and statistics do exist for different regions - it's not comparable at all. The likelihood that a tourist with exposure of 7 days would get caught up in that depends on how much you stick out as a wealthy tourist and whether you're at the wrong place, wrong time (really rotten luck, bad judgment, etc).

Posted by
553 posts

Are you posting this question in the Spain section because you have at least some interest in Spain? If so you must realize that Mexico's main language is Spanish because the country was colonized or invaded by Spain. I suspect that in order of interest, you would most like your next trip to be to Spain, if you don't visit Spain next you would like to travel to Mexico, if you do 't go to Mexico next you would go to Canada. I think you should make your next trip be to Spain, then on a future trip go to Mexico, and then if you still find Canada appealing, go there after Spain and Mexico. But if you are ruling out travel to Spain as your next trip, you should go to Mexico. You should be safe in Mexico if you just stay in and near the neighborhoods and sights recommended by the good guidebooks.

Posted by
12141 posts

You should be safe in Mexico if you just stay in and near the
neighborhoods and sights recommended by the good guidebooks.

Just spoke to some associates who spent the recent week in Cancun, they had a great trip. Everything in their tourist resort appeared to be up to the standards they were hoping for (Cardiologist retreat of sorts) Also spoke to a couple that just returned from Jamaica (Nurologist and wife), they reported well too. And I just got back from St Augustine and Orlando; excellent trip. So there are some options.

Posted by
6515 posts

James, did you read what the OP was interested in (see related thread)? If not, here it is:

"I like architecture (old buildings), statues (like you see in the European countries), art, music, old churches, museums, good food. Like stuff from Middle Ages, Colonial Era. Not so much into ancient history. Not into bars, partying, drinking....
If we go to Mexico, it would be Mexico City, San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Zacatecas, and Morelia. Colonial towns"

Resorts in Cancun, Jamaica, and Florida have nothing to do with these interests. St. Augustine is the closest (Old Spain) but is not a great deal budget wise compared to colonial cities in Mexico.

Posted by
6104 posts

This post might receive more answers if placed in correct “ Beyond Europe” forum.

Posted by
12141 posts

Actually, I was in St Augustine 2 weeks ago. Airfare from Texas was under $400 round trip and the bed and breakfast was about $175 a night. There were cheaper but this was sort of a last minute thing and most all was booked.

I was pleasantly surprised. Like New Orleans in appearance, architecture and style, but cleaner.

So according to Agnes, meets your desires.

Posted by
2928 posts

James - St. Augustine is only good for a couple days at most, not 8 or 9, and everything Spanish related can be seen in a day. Much more history and colonial architecture in Mexico. My preference is still Spain.

Posted by
12141 posts

Not sure how we got off on the St Augustine tangent. My vote between Mexico and Canada would be Mexico. Much more interesting.

Posted by
12141 posts

Ufkak is correct. I live not far from the border and spend a bit of time on the other side; and at time the issues spill over to here. But with common sense, and respect of reality, it can be a very safe trip.