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Worried about Scotland trip

I am suppose to go to Scotland on June 1st for my dream vacation. I've always wanted to go!now they are talking about Isis coming over to Italy, so I am scared by June they might be close to Scotland. Is anyone else planning a trip for that time and if so are you concerned

Posted by
1939 posts

Oh please don't give up your dream trip! I am going to Italy for 3 weeks with my grown up children and my teenage grandchildren in June. We are all beyond excited at the prospect and have no plans to change our destination. I do hope you go!

Posted by
484 posts

Relax and enjoy Scotland!!! I was there a couple of years ago. Very good security. I never felt any discomfort. It's a safe place. Probably safer than the USA. Have a great time. Best Wishes. The only thing you need to be concerned about is the Haggis and black pudding. Drink a crabbie's ginger beer for me (with or without alcohol).

Posted by
6334 posts

I'm sorry but I just don't get it. This poster (and the ones on the other threads like this) is talking about ISIS as if they are like the Huns or Mongol Hordes, marching across the continents capturing cities/countries as they go. Where is this fear coming from? I can only think it's because they announce their desired targets, unlike Al-Qaeda whose attacks on US soil were a surprise and nobody had time to freak out. It seems to me that they are quite smart about making these announcements because if their intent is to instill fear, it's working.

Posted by
3091 posts

Is this for real ? You are watching too much FOX ! Scotland ? , SCOTLAND ? , did you say ? You have a much better chance of getting run over by a car if you don't look RIGHT before crossing a street since cars driving on the left come at you from your RIGHT !!! If you are really that frightened , you should not make this trip , you certainly won't enjoy it with those sentiments .

Posted by
3525 posts

Somehow I don't think Scotland is a target. But if it is, and if they hurt any of those adorable "hairy coos," they're gonna have me to contend with!

Posted by
86 posts

Thanks Andi, Barb, Priscilla and Lo. I still plan on going. Hope things look better by then. I can't wait to see all the beauty is had to offer.

Posted by
333 posts

I think many travelers overseas (especially if it's their first time) are afraid when the news is full of scary events near their desired destination. With that being said, the important thing is to put the fear in perspective. Anyplace can be a potential terrorist target. Unless you want to stay locked up in your home (and even that isn't completely safe from madmen) you need to remember that your're as safe there as anywhere else. Our own governent has been warning us for years to have our homes prepared for possible terrorist attack- and I don't know anybody who has the recommended supplies suggested for preparation. Do you? So if we're not afraid on our own soil, we shouldn't be afraid on foreign soil either. You can get safe traveler alerts on us.gov which will show you what the safety status level is on foreign countries. Take every reasonable precaution for safety that you'd take anywhere. Then go and have a great time! I'll be going to Scotland too- in May. It'll be my first time there and I'm ready to have a ball!

Posted by
56 posts

As far as I'm concerned, you can't get much safer than Scotland. Our daughter is in the middle of a 4-year degree program there and she travels around a bit...taking intelligent precautions as a young woman should in the US or abroad. I feel that she is safer there than she is when she's here in the U.S. ...and we are fairly protective parents. We're going to visit her this spring and have not thought twice about it even with the gloomy news reports. ISIS wants to scare. It's their most powerful weapon. It's amazing the effect of a few words. Scotland is extraordinarily beautiful and full of rich history that you'll just begin to peel back as you travel the country, and the Scottish people we've met have all been so kind and gracious (even when we couldn't understand what they were saying, but that was just in Glasgow!) You'll be in good hands, even in the remotely small chance that something should disrupt your travels. And, frankly, it's far more likely that the disruption would be a rail strike or an airline strike than an act of terrorism. Go! Don't pass up this opportunity. You're going to love it!

Posted by
796 posts

Go and enjoy your trip, teani, and don't give it another thought. Our family is constantly traveling in our work and we've been to over 100 countries, including in the Middle East. Isis is just a big-mouthed bunch of buffoons always mouthing off about where they will go and what they will do but it is mostly hot air. Scotland would be one of the last places on earth those desert rats would want to go and I'd love to see them try to get past UK security. We'll be all over Europe in June and don't worry about Isis at all. Go and enjoy that dream trip you have been waiting for. Isis won't be there to bother you.

Posted by
1173 posts

Anything can happen any time any where. You have to live your life. Should you take foolish chances and walk down a dark alley, or go to crime ridden area, no. But not to go to Scotland because something can happen, that makes no sense. I understand your fears, we live in a difficult world. But things happen. People get into car accidents everyday, but they still get into a car, or cross the street. Planes do crash ( that is scary) but people do fly. We have to keep going until we can't any longer. You always need to try to be safe and be careful, but not live your life in fear that something will happen. Have a great time and enjoy the tour. Scotland is a beautiful country and the scenery is amazing. I don't want to sound like I am being mean, just want you to live your life to the fullest.

Posted by
453 posts

teani since you are driving and are going to Skye and safety appears to be a concern prepare for driving on the roads in the Highlands and on Skye by reading up and becoming familiar with the roundabouts and using single lane roads which you will encounter on Skye. There courtesies and rules of the road that you need to be aware of. Do your very best to get the smallest car you can possible endure, the roads are narrow and often bordered by curbs and stone walls, the smaller the car the better and pay extra for an automatic...don't let your rental car company push you into a larger car when you arrive in Scotland..stay small! I was just there a couple of months ago and these issues will be a bigger safety concern than the terror idiots but I understand your concerns. I totally loved Scotland for the people, the food, and the natural beauty.

Posted by
4325 posts

Your question makes me frightened to visit Alabama!

Posted by
5561 posts

Teani, You should be fine. Scotland is a wee place and even in the heart of the tourist season--which June is not--there are not a lot of people. The only time I've seen true crowds is in Edinburgh at Festival time.

And you've gotten some good advice on driving. If you not already found Undiscovered Scotland online here's a link to their driving advice. They have lots of great info. You should explore it.

Pam

Posted by
86 posts

Thanks everyone for your KIND advice. By the way, I'm not driving, I will be on a tour. My 25 yr old son is coming with me. Hope to enjoy some good mother son time

Posted by
4976 posts

teani- your tour company won't let anything bad happen to you, it would be bad for business ;-).

Do plan on some rain, though, and bring appropriate clothing and footwear for wet weather, if you will be going outside - and I hope you will. Our trip, which did include some challenging driving on our part, was great last August - have a fantastic Dream Trip!

Posted by
8293 posts

Watch out for the haggis. I've heard it is everywhere.

Posted by
86 posts

Thanks to everyone for their replies, Emily, I did not write this to offend anyone, if I have I'm sorry. I truly have concerns, maybe I am watching to much news but it's better to stay informed than be oblivious to what is going on in the world.