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Weather and clothing

I have looked through the posts and have not seen mention of the weather currently in Scotland for the June 15th tour. Coat or just rain coat? Rubber boots or no? I hear the north has chilling North Sea winds. How to pack? Swimsuit? I think not but don't know. Thanks in advance.

Posted by
217 posts

Can't really comment on the rubber boots, since it really depends on what you'll be doing, but I don't think you'll need the coat. Just take a good raincoat and a warm layer for underneath, like a fleece or sweatshirt. When I was in the highlands it was the first week of May, and I don't remember needing anything heavier than a sweatshirt. There was more sun than I expected, too.

Hope this helps!
~C

Posted by
5561 posts

It can get get quite cool, but it can also be pleasant so you need to think layers. You need a water proof jacket--not water resistant. I like one with a hood so I don't have to mess with an umbrella. I never take rubber boots, but because I go walking I bring some hiking boots with me. If you are not going hiking, have a good walking shoe. Spray it with silicon, and hav e an alternate shoe.

I find that you usually need long pants. I have only worn shorts a handful of times.

Pam

Posted by
5668 posts

We bought wool sweaters on a wet, cold day in Scotland in August. Great souvenirs.

Posted by
2515 posts

It has been very windy here this last week but have had a bit of sunshine.hiking boots are a good idea if you intend to do a lot of walking or if you are going to be in the countryside a lot. a waterproof is a must and don't use a poncho so favoured by so many Americans, because of the wind they become pretty useless.
and an extra layer such as a decent fleece is also a good idea.

Posted by
1291 posts

Over the last few days we have had a warm dry days and a couple of torrential downpours. The constant about Scottish weather is it is changeable. it is better to dress for the weather with layers as Unclegus it is the wind that is the main problem.

Posted by
13 posts

Thank you! Warm to us in Texas is 91 degrees fahrenheit. Good to know about the wind.

Posted by
1291 posts

For us, warm is upper teens degrees celcius, it was knocking on the door of twenty this week.

Posted by
5654 posts

In my limited exposure to Scottish weather the only certainly is change.

Posted by
5654 posts

In my limited exposure to Scottish weather the only certainly is change.

Posted by
5654 posts

In my limited exposure to Scottish weather the only certainly is change.

Posted by
5654 posts

In my limited exposure to Scottish weather the only certainly is change.

Posted by
742 posts

so true, bares repeating.
There was new snow only last week on the mountains..and at Cairngorm they often have a mid summers day ski..albeit it very limited

Posted by
5561 posts

Ah, but there is always the trip that I will always remember when I got my Scottish sun burn from a nap in the Ullapool Hills!

Posted by
4752 posts

Northern parts of the UK are currently cooler than average, with Scotland have lots of wind this week. The BBC forecast on TV tonight was threatening 3 degrees overnight in Scotland in rural parts - we would not normally be expecting frosts at this time of year. Some parts are barely making double digit daytime temperatures too. It can change rapidly there.

We call them wellies or wellington boots here, not rubber boots. They shouldn't be needed for a tour but you will need layers and a waterproof coat with a hood.

Posted by
17 posts

We just got back from Scotland. We visited Edinburgh and the Isle of Skye. I needed layers for both as the weather changed during the day. Gloves and the hood on my raincoat were a must for the chilly windy weather. I didn't need rain boots for walking around Skye. Have fun!

Posted by
13 posts

Thanks so much. Layers it is. Still considering the wellies. Love dry feet. Will have to consider how to pack those. They only come above the ankle, not shin or knee length. Can't wait to see Isle of Skye.

Posted by
2515 posts

the chances of you needing wellies are pretty slim Scotland is not that wet.If things get that bad just buy a cheap pair in one of the numerous shops around , even in Skye they will be available, but seriously a decent pair of shoes or sneakers will probably suffice .I have survived nearly 60 years of living in Scotland without having to purchase wellies and my feet are still dry.

Posted by
5654 posts

...without having to purchase wellies and my feet are still dry.

Edinburgh must have a dryer climate than the west. Started drizzling as we left Drymen (north of Glasgow) a number of years ago in May. It because a downpour as we rounded Conic Hill. Gortex lined boots with rain pants and gaiters didn't help. Our socks were wringing-wet soaked by the time we reached Balmaha on Lock Lomand. We were "saved" finding shelter at the Oak Tree Inn with a bowl of hot fish soup for lunch and a chance to change into dry socks.

The UK method for drying boots is to stuff them with dry newspapers. It can take multiple changes of dry newspapers.

Posted by
2515 posts

yeah if you are out in the hills and off the main paths then nothing is going to keep your dry. I have hill walked all over Scotland ,if fact all over Europe and a decent pair of boots are needed but not willies.If the OP is just doing general walking around then the need for heavy duty expensive walking boots are really an expense too far.

Posted by
5561 posts

If you are really obsessing about keeping your feet dry when touring and not when hiking then a full one hiking boot is not what you want. But I think that there are some boots that are good for basic walking and are gortex and so waterproof. You should go to an REI and see what they have if you are really concerned. I think it would be much better to have a pair of shoes/boots that are waterproof than any kind of wellie or boot that goes over a shoe--anybody remember Totes? :)

Pam

Posted by
13 posts

Looks like a visit to REI is in order. Thanks! Obsessing is the operative word. I can't predict everything! I have to remember I can shop for my needs in Scotland if it is dire.

Posted by
1291 posts

Just to back up the changeable nature. Saturday past = torrential downpours, low 10s C and overcast.

This morning at 8 am in Glasgow, 18 degrees C shirts sleeves and sunscreen.

Posted by
2515 posts

Just looking at the weather for next week , looks like it is going to be not bad, not the heat we are having at the moment but certainly mid- high teens centigrade (no idea what that is in old money) maybe some light rain in various places at various times but nothing you will need full waterproofs and wellies for.

Posted by
5561 posts

Ah, Richard, I agree, but so many Americans like their heat! It's going to be near 90 in NYC today and no one is too unhappy about it. The whining doesn't really hit until it's been in the mid 90's for several days. As for me, give me a clear day between 65 and 75 and I am delighted!

I think that as Kelly Rippa (yes, I know, I can't believe I am quoting Kelly Rippa) said, many Americans are part Iguana and just love the heat.

Pam

Posted by
13 posts

It has been 100 degrees here outside of Ft Worth for the past 4-5 days. We were in severe flooding conditions 3 weeks ago. Scotland's temps sound divine!

Posted by
5561 posts

See! It's above the mid 90's for multiple and we crave Scottish weather. LOL. :)

Posted by
86 posts

Just got back on June 7. We were there a wk. it was very cold and rainy our first three days. Being from the south was not used to it. Highs is low 50's. Wore two shirts and rain jacket with hiking boots. Had a couple decent days in low sixties with sun. Those days were beautiful! Had a wonderful trip despite the weather!

Posted by
5561 posts

My mom commented that the most useful clothes she packed for a June trip to Orkney was a pair of flannel lined blue jeans. :)

Pam

Posted by
977 posts

Warm layers, windproof/waterproof jacket, waterproof shoes and for me the most important item A THERMAL HAT. The only time i wear this type of hat is when I travel to the norther hemisphere. The wind and wind chill factor is something we don't have to deal with in our mediterranean climate in South Australia.