Please sign in to post.

Driving is Scotland

So I love driving in Scotland and have been to nearly every corner. But when this > video
was done, I was four years away from my first visit and that first trip was all trains, ferries and buses. There are lots of resources these days for driving in Scotland. Undiscovered Scotland for example has good advice.

Does anyone else have any recommendations for when we next get to cruise the single track roads again? I think that there are some that not only enlightening, but also very funny.

Pam

Posted by
1683 posts

Pam, I'm a devil-may-care kinda fella and have no problem driving single-track roads in Ireland and Scotland. I went so fast once my wife almost got sick, but I thought it was kinda funny. We take accurate maps and I study them the night before. With my photographic memory it is no problemo. Anyway, boys will be boys I guess!

Posted by
5574 posts

Big Mike, you might enjoy the boo Raw Spirit by Iain Banks. It is a wonderful book about the search for a perfect dram. He also talks about the wonderful drives that he has taken around Scotland.

Posted by
527 posts

Here's the video that I usually share with guests before they arrive. Hairy Coo single track driving

Just a note about 'L' plates. They are really only for learner drivers, that is those who do not have a full licence. There are various regulations surrounding learner drivers, such as the fact that they cannot drive alone (obviously) and have to be supervised by someone over 21. Learner drivers can only drive on motorways if the car is fitted with dual controls and they are accompanied by a driving instructor. You could get stopped by the police if you appear to be a learner (I.e. you have an L plate) and you are breaking any of the regulations applying to learner drivers. While you will probably be able to prove you're not really a learner, it could be a bit of a hassle. So I'd actually recommend getting a 'P' plate rather than an 'L' plate. P stands for probationer or new driver and just shows other road users that you are a less experienced driver. P plates are not mandatory, so there are no regulations surrounding their use. You can buy them in all the same places as L plates, e.g. really big supermarkets or hardware stores, or shops specialising in car equipment - the chain Halfords have a branch in most large towns, often on the retail parks on the edge of town.

Here is a link to the UK Highway code that is essential reading before driving here. Highway Code The Highway Code does say you should remove your L plates when you have passed your driving test.

Hope this helps.

Jacqui (Skyegirl)

Posted by
5574 posts

Thanks for adding the bit about Learner Plates. I knew that there were some issues with using it, but couldn’t remember for sure what it was! I find I adjust pretty quickly to driving on the left. It helps to have the steers wheel on the right! I don’t know how Brits do it when they take their cars to Europe! My boss goes to Germany all the time!

Posted by
415 posts

I loved driving on the big modern highway coming out of the airport. What scared the cr@p out of me was the skinny little narrow road leading to our resort. At sections it was one lane with a rocks jutting out a rock wall on one side and a loch on the other side. At some points there was a barrier on the loch side but at other points there was a straight drop off into the loch. But my gosh it was a gorgeous area.

Posted by
4450 posts

To add to Skyegirl's comment, the 'P' plates are green whereas the 'L' plates are red (coloured letters on a white background). I've never seen a green 'L' plate and wouldn't have thought that they were unique to Scotland as the UK driving laws are not country specific so suspect that the green 'L' plate mentioned was actually a 'P' plate. I also agree that if going down the plate route, which is a good idea, then the 'P' option is the best and more road legal.

Posted by
527 posts

Spot on JC. If it was green it must have been a P plate. I believe Rick no longer advises use of L plates as it's been pointed out to him that it's strictly for those with a provisional licence.

Jacqui

Posted by
1299 posts

A red L (also a red D in Wales) has legal meaning, the green P does not.

For single track roads, best to try and keep between 45 - 50, and always be prepared to give way to vehicles either coming the other way or behind you. The speed limit is 60 mph and some of the locals will be at that speed.

Most of Scotland is on Street View, so worth having a look at some of the roads on that.