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Airlines to UK

I’ve only flown Virgin Airlines to UK and was very pleased with their service. Did I just get lucky or are most flights overseas better than in the States?

Posted by
16890 posts

Yes, in my experience, most trans-Atlantic flight tickets include meal service, all types of beverages, a wide variety of video entertainment, and one checked bag at no extra cost, even after those have disappeared from domestic flights. However, other budget carriers and ticketing strategies are starting to eat into that "general rule," so in the future, you'll still have to check the details before you buy.

Posted by
9238 posts

Yes, international flights with airline companies based in USA and elsewhere, usually offer better services than domestic ones.

Posted by
4959 posts

We always fly British Airways to the UK, or United to other places in Europe. Not only is your first checked bag free, but there is a meal, usually chicken or pasta options, free wine with dinner, and a snack before landing (the ones before landing they may as well do away with). You also have the individual movie screen and a large selection of movies, that are free. On United or American you can select your seat assignment when purchasing your ticket at no extra charge. With British Airways you have to pay for the seat assignment or get it for free 24 hours before flight time. If going to South America, those routes get the older planes, so you may not get the streaming movies. American Airlines tends to have many of those routes.

Posted by
4939 posts

Flying domestic in the US is a whole different experience to flying transatlantic. In addition, American carriers are often a poor comparison to most other carriers. Virgin Atlantic is a very good carrier, particularly if you're flying Upper Class. British Airways have gone downhill over the last few years but I would still choose them over any of the US carriers.

Posted by
123 posts

We only use Norwegian and have been perfectly happy with their service.

My best friend and her husband only fly first class carriers because one of them has a physical disability and needs larger seating. They have tried all carriers and fly >twice a year to Edinburgh to visit family. They now only fly Delta and have been very pleased. However, she also has had occasions that first class is booked so then they fly first to Amsterdam on Delta then first class on a smaller carrier to Edinburgh. This option is pricey and adds two hours but under the circumstances it is a backup plan for them given their needs.

Posted by
4939 posts

they fly first to Amsterdam on Delta then first class on a smaller carrier to Edinburgh

Which carrier do they fly to Edinburgh with? As far as I'm aware there are no carriers offering first class on intra European flights.

Posted by
9042 posts

It's called an abbreviation. Like saying Man U, or Spurs.
Odd that saying "Virgin Airlines" instead of "Virgin Atlantic Airways" doesn't seem to be on your radar, pardon the pun.

Posted by
123 posts

JC:
I’ll ask for you about the smaller carriers. I didn’t say earlier because I couldn’t remember but will ask her.

Posted by
4939 posts

JC:
I’ll ask for you about the smaller carriers. I didn’t say earlier because I couldn’t remember but will ask her.

Thanks, no real biggie, I was just curious to see who still operates a first class on intra European flights particularly as British Airways continue their spiral into budget class airline but without the budget price tag and most other national carriers are going the same route.

Posted by
4910 posts

Slightly off topic, but why do people in the US call the company “ British Air” when it is called “British Airways”?

I think it is just because we don’t hear ”British Airways” much in advertising here so it is not ingrained in our brain. Also, airways isn’t really a word one hears so much in American English except when talking about lung function.

Posted by
5697 posts

And for Emma -- Americans may have used "Virgin Atlantic" to differentiate that airline from "Virgin America" which was abbreviated to "Virgin" here. (Note -- now merged into Alaska Airlines, so that potential confusion is solved.)