Shampoo and soap in hotels

Do Courtyard Marriott hotels in Rome & Venice provide shampoo and soap? What can I expect compared to US Courtyards?

Posted by Elizabeth
Pittsburg
9 posts

Most hotels in Europe, except extreme budget types, provide soap and shampoo along with hair dryers and often other items. Not to worry.

Posted by Frank
Tresana, Highlands Ranch, CO, USA
10884 posts

I would be a little cautious about 'most". That is probably true for four and five star hotels. Much closer to standard US hotels. I am sure the Marriott falls into that group. Our experience with two and three star hotels is mixed. So do and many don't. We always carry a small amount of our preferred shampoo and conditioner. And, of course, bar soap is always provided. Wash clothes or face clothes are the missing items. Available in higher end hotels. Almost never in lower end hotels.

Posted by Norma
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
3409 posts

If shampoo is not provided (soap always is) then you now have a golden opportunity to try out an Italian brand and when you take it home it will remind you of Italy every time you use it. I usually buy toothpaste, too, in the country I am in. It pleases me to see the foreign-looking tube. (I'm just a simple person!)

Posted by Michael
Seattle, WA, USA
5770 posts

Ditto on the washcloths. Very hard to find, for some reason. I don't understand how the same culture that puts a bidet in every bathroom doesn't also provide washcloths. Go figure.

Posted by Ken
Vernon, Canada
17783 posts

@Michael, "I don't understand how the same culture that puts a bidet in every bathroom" They do seem to place great importance on having a Bidet available in every bathroom. I once stayed at a hotel in Florence where the Bidet was located inside the shower enclosure (go figure, indeed). Cheers!

Posted by Harold
New York, NY, USA
2852 posts

Washcloths are considered "too personal" to put in a hotel room for guests; as Europeans see it, it would be like putting underwear in the room. That's the explanation I've read, anyway, and knowing how washcloths are used, it makes some sense. So, yes, if you want a washcloth (for any reason), bring your own. I agree that I would expect a Courtyard Marriot in Europe to provide soap, shampoo and hair dryer. But you can always e-mail the hotel to check, if that information is not on the hotel's website (it often is).

Posted by donna
roswell, ga, usa
1012 posts

I take the large L'oreal face washing cloths (disposable) and they double as a wash cloth. They take up little room, and I throw them away after each use. You can buy them in the grocery store or drug store, and there are other brands available as well. There are also adult size "wipes" that are used for bathing senior citizens also available. We stayed at a high end place in London, and even they didn't offer wash cloths.

Posted by Frank
Tresana, Highlands Ranch, CO, USA
10884 posts

Just checking - you do realize that the Marriott Courtyard is not very close to any of part of old Rome and it will be a major effort getting to and from the main tourist sites. I am guess you are using points.

Posted by Roberto
Fremont, CA, USA
3349 posts

Are you collecting shampoo samples from hotels? Never stayed at the Ctyard in Italy, but every hotel I've stayed in Italy, even the budget hotels, provided both shampoo and soap. So I can't imagine that C. by M., being more upscale, will skimp on that. In any case, they do have stores in Rome and Venice where you can purchase small bottles of shampoo if the hotel doesn't provide the brand you like.

Posted by Roberto
Fremont, CA, USA
3349 posts

ON THE ISSUE OF WASHING CLOTHS The reason why you won't see washing cloths in Italy is not because of being too personal or whatever. It's because they simply DON'T EXIST and they have no idea they even exist. You won't even find them in stores. Those hotels that have them, it's probably because they are US chains with large American clientele. So how do Italians take their baths or showers without washing cloths? Italians use sponges. Regular bath sponges (traditional or mesh type). If hotels provide those I don't know or don't remember, but in every Italian household there are bath sponges which are used for bathing (or showering, since bath tubs are going out of style) ON THE ISSUE OF BIDETS The reason why every Italian hotel bothers to have bidets is because also EVERY Italian house comes with bidets. It is a standard fixture in every Italian bathroom in every house. They don't build bathrooms without bidets like they don't build bathrooms without toilet. Bathrooms without bidets simply do not exist, unless they are half bathrooms (not for the bedrooms for example, but in the living area) or unless they are those stalls at public restrooms at train stations/airports or restaurants etc. But you can go to any Italian house, and their bathrooms will have bidets. They don't make them without one. Obviously hotel bedrooms will follow the same standard. Wash cloths however....niente! Sponges. Call the hotel desk and ask for a SPONGE and a BRUSH (for your back). Bath Sponge in italian is: SPUGNA (pronounce: Spoon-ya) DA BAGNO Brush is: SPAZZOLA DA BAGNO If the hotel doesn't provide it. Buy it here: http://www.the-body-shop.it/it/accessori/bagno-corpo.html

Posted by Allen
Lafayette, LA
194 posts

I bring a very small amount of soap and shampoo just in case. But I never need it as even the two star hotels I have used provided those items.

Posted by SamSn
Scottsdale, AZ, USA
1092 posts

I'd love to have someone ask their hotel staff for a brush & a sponge. I'm betting the request will not be accommodated.

Posted by Betty
Waco
5 posts

FYI re Marriott Courtyard Park Central in Rome: There is a hotel shuttle to St. Peters Museum several times a day, 3E per trip and the Gemelli Local FM#3 train station is 1 block away. Nearest Metro subway station is 1.2 miles (Battispini)...at least that is what I am being told. If anyone has any more info or can confirm the above, it would be appreciated. Also this hotel requires converters as they do not have any dual You may also need an adapter. I bought one for the trip. Still shopping for converter.

Posted by Frank
Tresana, Highlands Ranch, CO, USA
10884 posts

Be absolutely certain you need a converter before you buy one. In general converters are bad ideas. What do you need a converter for? St Peter's Museum is on the far edge of the main tourist areas so it would be a long walk to most of the things you would want to visit. Probably best to take a taxi or at least a taxi on your return. Just use mapquest or goggle maps to see the location.

Posted by Betty
Waco
5 posts

Marriott International told me I will need a converter to charge my cell phone (LG Android Smart Phone) and my camera at my specific hotel as they do not have dual voltage outlets. I cannot change hotels. Is there an alternative? Why are converters a bad idea if one also has the correct adapter other than it is something extra to take or buy there and then one still has to bring it back to the US. If anyone has more info, it would be appreicated...also info on converters unless there is an good alternative.

Posted by Frank
Tresana, Highlands Ranch, CO, USA
10884 posts

You need to spend sometime with good guidebooks on European travel and a little research. You are not going to Dallas. You need a converter IF, big IF, the appliance has ONLY a 120 volt input. You know that by reading the input information on the plug. If it is says something close to Input 120v, 50-60hz, then you will need a converter. IF, and this is important, if the input tag says something like Input 120-240/250 volts, then all you will need is adapter for the plug end because it will handle the 220/240 volts in Europe. Most recently made electronics - cameras, cell phones, ipads, etc. are all have dual voltage input and do not need a converter. So check carefully the input requirements of the electric items you intend to take. My guess is that you will not need a converter. An item can be damaged by using a converter on something that is designed for dual voltage. High wattage requirements such as hair dryers, curling irons, etc., are different and may not be dual voltage. However, even with a converter these items are often damaged by the high voltage. That is why converters are generally a bad idea. They do not always work that well. You do understand that data plans for your cell phone can run into hundreds of dollars per month if you do make special arrangement with your cell phone provider. Some have international plans, so do not. So check carefully or you will have a big surprise when you get home.

Posted by Nigel
East Midlands, England
8758 posts

You've got it, Betty. Converters change voltage (badly to very badly) and adapters just change the shape of the plug so it fits the socket. Get a couple of adapters, they're cheap and small, and easily lost and valuable.

Posted by Betty
Waco
5 posts

Your right, my phone charger says 100-240v and Italy is per guide book 230v. Apparently some people at T mobile don't even know that about their own phone accessorries. And as mentioned before I am reading Rick Steves book on Italy which I highly recommend.