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permesso de sogornio (stay permit)

I was looking on the Italian Consulate and The State Dept Website, and both require a stay permit if you plan to stay in the country longer than 8 business days. A) Is it really necessary? B) Can those requirements be completed in the US or do I have wait in a Post Office in Italy? C) What is the penalty or fine if I do not do this process? Please advise. Thanks

Posted by
73 posts

I am not sure about this but I think it refers to people going on business. We travelled last year to Italy and were there for 3 weeks and only required our passports. I think if you are an American citizen and passport holder you can travel to any country in Western Europe and now even some Eastern European countries as a tourist for upto 3 months.

Posted by
468 posts

I was just in Italy for two weeks in March of this year, my sixth trip to Italy. I have never heard of this requirement and have never been asked if I have the permit.

When you stay in a hotel, the hotel keeps your passport briefly, maybe this is why.

We usually rent a house or an apartment so we don't have anyone asking for our passport.

Rick Steves makes no mention of this in his book. That coupled with my experiences, I find it hard to believe that it is really necessary.

Posted by
216 posts

I leave for my fifth visit to Italy next Monday--16 days this time. I've never heard of this requirement or been asked to produce such a document. I assume that they wold check for it at immigration--never have. I wouldn't worry about it.

Posted by
1 posts

I too have seen this on the State Dept. site. I emailed the Italian Consulate in DC in reference to this. They also stated they require Photo's, aside from your passport copy, and proof of means of financial support, and photo copy of insurance policy, as well as proof you are able to get home. If I get an answer from the Consulate, I will pass it on. I am concerned about the requirements, since I will be there over the stipulated "8 days". I am also going to Croatia, which by the way, does not require anything more than your passport, and proof of return ticket home.

Posted by
204 posts

My first visit to Italy (and the rest of Europe) was in 1951, my most recent was 3 weeks ago. We have beens in Italy as long as a couple of months and as short a time as a couple of days. This discussion of the "permesso de sogornio" (stay permit)
seems to come up periodically. There is no such requirement. Forget it. In planning a vacation, like any other endeavor, you should think and plan carefully, but don't over-think it. Remember, you are going to enjoy yourself.

Posted by
29 posts

The US State department web site states: "Those staying for more than eight days, are required to register with local police and obtain a permit to stay (permesso di soggiorno)." at this URL http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/brochures/brochures_1229.html#i

Since it says register with local police I had thought maybe it meant a stay of more than 8 days in one location, but that isn't specified.

Posted by
25 posts

It has always been my understanding that such a permesso is not required for stays under 90 days. I have never registered with the local police of obtained one. Then again, I guess you can't really argue with what the State Dept. website says. Either way, I don't think you will ever be asked if you have one or not.

Posted by
12 posts

Hi Mark,
I just saw the same posting on the State Deptartment's website today. I'm going to Italy later this summer and will be there more than 8 business days. Contrary to what some of the posts found on these message boards say, Italy did institute a new law in December of 2006 requiring tourists who were staying for more than 8 business days to fill out a "permit to stay" in order to register with the local authorities. I was confused by the mixed information I was getting from the State Department and various message boards, so I called the Italian Embassy in DC. The woman I spoke to in the Consular Affairs Office told me that, as of June 2, 2007, Italy has dispensed with the permesso di soggiorno requirement.

Happy travels!

Posted by
84 posts

My understanding is that technically you would only need to worry about this if you planned to live there or stay for a certain duration of time. I think if you were to rent an apartment for six months or something, you would need one of these. With the incredible beauracy of the Italian government, I wouldn't even worry about this. After all, my experience is they hardly bother to stamp your passport coming into the country.

Posted by
1 posts

I lived in Italy for two years and have traveled there extensively. The permesso di soggiorno is taken care of by your hotel (yes, this is why they keep your passport for a few hours upon checking in). Technically, if you are staying at a friends house, for example, then you are required to be registered, but nobody does this. They will only ask for a permesso if you are opening a bank account, buying (not renting) a car, and rarely when getting a cell phone. It is only important to get one if you're staying long enough to need a visa, and if that is the case you better schedule an entire day to do it. But then it takes about 6 months or more to be issued the official permesso, requiring frequent visits to the questura to see if it is ready. Often these places are quite out of the way. Rome is now (thankfully) decentralized and you can go to any neighborhood police station. But in Venice the only questura is on the mainland and you have to line up at 6am, and wait all day.

Posted by
44 posts

Thanks everyone for the info. I think we will make it. Happy Trails!!!!