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Miniseries "The Medici" is on Netflix

A friend told me that "The Medici" miniseries is available on Netflix.

Posted by
1097 posts

Yes, and Versailles is available as well. We watched both over a snowy weekend. If you are bothered by naked people and sex, you might want to steer clear of them (esp Versailles). I'm sure the historical accuracy is questionable at best, but they were very entertaining.

I was most distracted by the casting of Dustin Hoffman as the senior Medici. Couldn't they at least find an Italian-America actor for the role? Al Pacino? This bothered me more than it probably should have.

Posted by
11613 posts

Celeste, I am with you 100%! I usually watch these things for the backdrop locations. I find myself constantly fact-checking while I watch and listen to the dialog (undergrad history major).

Posted by
112 posts

"THE MEDICI" ... Bad acting to comic proportions broken by moments of gratuitous sex scenes.

Posted by
15985 posts

If you are bothered by naked people... you might want to steer
clear...

... of Italy! Lordy, there's barenekked statchoos and pitchers purt'near everywheres a feller looks!
(Cover yer eyes, Mabel!)

Posted by
1097 posts

Lordy, there's barenekked statchoos and pitchers purt'near everywheres
a feller looks! (Cover yer eyes, Mabel!)

Kathy - I'm not sure whether to laugh or be offended. I'll go with laughing. :D

Posted by
11613 posts

Thanks, Michael. I haven't watched it myself, but last summer it was heavily advertised on Italian TV.

Posted by
15985 posts

Kathy - I'm not sure whether to laugh or be offended. I'll go with
laughing. :D

You chose correctly, Celeste. :O)

A little nudity story?
In Trinita dei Monte, the church at the top of the Spanish Steps in Rome, there are several works by Daniele da Volterra. He was a contemporary of Michelangelo and the master had provided him drawings upon which he based some of his paintings. In his "Assumption of the Virgin" he's believed to have painted the likeness of his benefactor as the face of St. Luke, the patron saint of painters (far right figure in the pinkish robe, pointing upwards.)

http://blistar.net/images/photos/a4433e4b044be78a7964c5644c374127.jpg

Anyway, the church got a little twitchy about all the birthday suits adorning their hallowed spaces and the Council of Trent decided there would be no more of THAT. Volterra was hired by Pope Pius IV in 1564/65 to paint drapery and whatnot over the exposed naughty bits and backsides of his (recently deceased) buddy's "Last Judgement" in the Sistine Chapel. He didn't finish the job but it was enough to earn him the nickname "Il Braghettone"; "The Breeches Maker".

The End.
(No, it hadn't a thing to do with the Medici but it's still marginally on topic. Sort of. )

Posted by
2530 posts

Kathy brings up an important issue -- when restoring artwork like those in Sistine Chapel, it takes a lot of debate and negotiation to decide which version of a work to restore it to -- the original theatrical release or the cable version or the video rental version or the director's cut or the overseas distribution or the commemorative re-release . . . . . . . .
Much of what we see when sightseeing today has been edited for broadcast.
:P

I'm glad I read this thread. I saw a PBS miniseries about the Medici that was history based. I didn't know there was another version. I wanted to see the PBS version minus all the fund-drive breaks.