Please sign in to post.

How it’s going in Italy: stories from Rome

The blog Rome the Second Time is featuring stories from residents that are quite insightful. Here is one and you can explore their site for more.

Posted by
4501 posts

There is nothing to do but wait, so we wait….

A sobering account of their daily lives.

Thanks Laurel for sharing this blog.

Posted by
1711 posts

Oh my goodness, Laurel--

This is tragic on so many levels, but what caught me was the author saying, matter-of-factly, that her sister-in-law's mother in Torino has been hospitalized and is likely to die soon. Like another casualty of war. And I am certain that those in Rome that were born 1935 or before see the similarities to 1940-1945 during WWII.

Roma has such a special place in my soul, and I can only imagine how heartbreaking it is for you to see this since you lived there for years. It will return, as it has numerous times over two thousand plus years. I think the experience of its rebirth, when (not if) it happens, will be glorious. That's what great cities of this planet do. If they enjoyed everyday life so much then, how will it be now?! Grateful. I'll be there a year from now, book it.

Hope all is well with you & hubby, Laurel!

Jay

Posted by
335 posts

This might be pay-walled, and if it is, please forgive me.

"Italy Is Sending Another Warning:
This is what a country a month into lockdown looks like: desperate, hungry and scared."

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/07/opinion/italy-coronavirus-naples.html

Apart from the absolutely tragic human suffering, this raises serious concerns about the viability of Italian bonds and the number of very large financial institutions who bought them in huge numbers.

-- Mike Beebe

Posted by
5017 posts

alas, the article linked above is indeed behind the NYT paywall.

Posted by
5308 posts

Thanks for sharing, Laurel. That is really interesting how they are using their blog to publish perspectives from different people.

Thinking of the elderly lady in Torino.

Posted by
335 posts

Crud -- thanks, David, for letting me know.

Hmm, I wonder if I can cut-and-paste it here without violating copyright law?

-- Mike Beebe

Posted by
39 posts

@Mike
I’m no economist whatsoever, but I like to think that Italy is a part of a bigger reality, both political and economic, called, you know, European Union. This for the viability of Italian bonds, mentioned in this time of suffering.
In my region we are not desperate nor hungry, and for now not so scared.
So, in this time of suffering, both humanitarian and economic, maybe I would just send good thoughts towards Italian citizens and their economic future.

Posted by
11417 posts

Hmm, I wonder if I can cut-and-paste it here without violating
copyright law?

The Times usually allows free access to a couple of articles a month. Mike, I've exceeded for this month but will give that a shot.

Thanks much for the link, Laurel. I've already clicked a few other topics on that blog (crossing fingers for Marcello's bookshop!) and will run through a few more tomorrow. We're expecting a very chilly, blustery day so it'll be a welcome pastime.

Posted by
335 posts

Aless,

"So, in this time of suffering, both humanitarian and economic, maybe I would just send good thoughts towards Italian citizens and their economic future."

Absolutely, and I certainly do both. However, I'm also a realist who knows if the EU can't gets its act together and quickly, the possibility of a sovereign default by Italy is very real. Such a default would be absolutely catastrophic both to the nation of Italy and the body of the European Union as a whole.

I very much hope this never happens.

-- Mike Beebe

Posted by
9388 posts

Wow, Kim, the photo essay is so touching and demonstrative of that sneaky invasion of this virus and it’s unpredictable nature.

Posted by
39 posts

@Mike
Thank you, if you put it like this it sounds like a truth told with empathy to a friend.
To my Italian ears the previous statement sounded like a financial warning to whom it may concern.
The US too are not immune to suffering in these times.
I just think that if someone has to say incredibly worrying things about our future, in a time when we’re having our share of terrible things and are perfectly aware of what is at stake economically speaking, maybe it’s better to say them with a lot of empathy and wishing for the best.