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Sandals in Ireland in May.

I want to bring only 2 pairs of shoes for our trip to Ireland in May. The first pair will be my comfy Hoka trainers, but I’m debating what to bring as my second pair. I have a comfortable pair of sandals, it wonder if it might be too cool for sandals in May. Being from North Dakota, I am well aware that weather varies, but, in general, would sandals be appropriate footwear in mid-to-late May?

Posted by
1116 posts

I would say it’s highly likely to be too cold for sandals. I would not be thinking about sandals for a UK or Ireland trip in May as I would not expect to wear them until summer. However, there can sometimes be unexpected warm weather, but to be on the safe side I’d say not to bring them. It’s highly unlikely to be so hot that you’ll wish you had them.

Posted by
3982 posts

I’m a sandal person year around, even in cool weather. I take a thin pair of “synthetic” croc or Birkenstock sandals with me on year round trips in the outer pocket of my carryon luggage or under seat bag. My main purpose for non summer travel is to have something comfortable to wear in my hotel or apartment when I come back and kick off my shoes worn all day. If the weather warms up while I’m there I have a pair of sandals I can slide into for some outdoor walks. But I’m not the norm as I don’t care for running/walking shoes.

EDIT: the thinnest, lightest styles of the above mentioned sandals are the Crocs Swiftwater Slides and the Birkenstock Madrid Essentials Eva.

Posted by
11443 posts

Based on trips to London in May of 2016 then Wales & Salisbury, England in 2019, absolutely NO to sandals. In London we froze in cold winds in 2016 for much of a week, and while Wales and Salisbury were pleasant enough in 2019, I absolutely never wished my toes were peeking out.

(We'll be in Ireland too in May. I am taking low hikers and a pair of ankle boots.)

Posted by
755 posts

I wouldn’t expect to be able to wear sandals in May, but you could always buy a pair of shoes there if you need to.

Posted by
295 posts

Greetings from west central MN! I live just across the Red River from ND, so I know that we are heartier people up here than in most other areas of the USA. My husband and I have visited Ireland twice--once in June and once in Nov. Looking at the average temps for May, and knowing that you are from ND, I would bring sandals. Most other people would freeze in sandals in 50-degree weather, but you know we break them out when it hits the 40s up here. That being said, if your feet are normally on the cold side, skip them. My feet are always hot, so I would have no problem wearing sandals when it's in the 50's--especially if we were doing a lot of walking.

Posted by
19 posts

Thank you for all of the helpful replies. Al daisy- I got a good laugh at your answer. You’re right- we wear sandals when it hits 40!

Posted by
51 posts

I too wear sandals year round, but primarily indoors in the winter. I always take a thin, lightweight pair on trips so that I can kick off those heavy hiking boots and relax in my hotel room in the sandals. I also ALWAYS wear sandals in hotel showers after catching a foot virus years ago from not doing so. I tuck my sandals into the front pocket of my carry on suitcase so they don't take up valuable real estate inside.

Posted by
99 posts

We were in Ireland in May last year, and although we were blessed with mostly dry weather, our first day was a downpour and I was happy I had my waterproof Oboz hiking shoes. My second pair was a more streamlined comfortable Clark's black shoe, which I wore to dinner and on shorter walking outings.
I always like to have 2 pairs to change up the pressure points.

I wouldn't like sandals because of the dirt paths, gravel parking lots, puddles or rain. We had some cool mornings and evenings and really loved my wool blend socks, I really like to have warm feet. Have fun! We loved it.

Posted by
6619 posts

I travel with Birkenstocks but only for indoor use or limited outdoor use in warm places. I took them to Ireland late last May and never wore them outdoors. It was always cool and sometimes rainy. But then, I'm not from the upper Midwest where apparently feet are hardier.

Posted by
33124 posts

will you mind if (when) the toesies get both wet and cold?

Posted by
645 posts

But then, I'm not from the upper Midwest where apparently feet are hardier.

LOL! I don't know if it is just feet and if hardy is the correct word;) My granddaughter came to visit one evening a few weeks ago wearing no jacket, her short volleyball shorts, socks and sandals. We still had over three feet of snow on the ground that day.

If you think you would wear them, bring them instead of regretting that you left them at home.

Posted by
19 posts

Okay, I bow to the collective wisdom. My second pair of shoes will be closed toe. Thanks, everyone!

Posted by
6619 posts

There's a subpopulation in western Washington, especially Seattle, whose winter uniform is a hooded rain parka, down or fleece vest, wool cap, shorts, and sandals without socks. This avoids having to dry out pants, socks, and shoes every day. But as a native east coaster I can't imagine dressing that way. Foot-hardiness sometimes leads to foolhardiness. ;-)