Please sign in to post.

Icebergs

Any advice for a trip to see icebergs in Iceland or Norway?

Posted by
5084 posts

The Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon, in southeastern Iceland, is renowned for its spectacular floating masses of ice. Some of them break up, and giant chunks wash up on the shore. We were there in April 2016, and it had surprisingly few icebergs then, although our guide took us a few miles down the road, to see more ice, and glaciers from which the ice breaks off. Do plan to be there before summer, though, as warmer temperatures aren’t conducive to seeing the ice.

Posted by
385 posts

We just got back last night from Iceland and agree with Jokulsarlon. We did the zodiac boat tour and as we were headed out into the lagoon, our guide could see the glacier calving. We raced over to that area and were able to watch the entire thing! They said it had not had a chunk come off in 6-7 days, which is a long time, so they were expecting something any time. We lucked out with getting the watch the entire thing unfold right in front of us, but from a safe distance. I highly recommend it! They were being very good with Covid too as masks were required on the boats, even though you are outside etc, FWIW.

Posted by
1447 posts

Different country, but you can see icebergs off the northern coast of Newfoundland.
It's known as Iceberg Alley.
Two years ago in July, we saw many , along the coastal areas between King's Point and Twilingate.
An absolutely wonderful place to have a holiday, can't wait to go back!

Posted by
32 posts

Do plan to be there before summer, though, as warmer temperatures aren’t conducive to seeing the ice.

This isn't true - Jökulsárlón has icebergs year round, and there were many to see (and kayak around, as we did) this August. There were also plenty of ice chunks washed ashore on nearby Diamond Beach. Sadly as the glacier is melting faster due to climate change, I wonder if the icebergs will be come more plentiful.

Posted by
5084 posts

Wow, Joy, you gad quite an experience! Warm temperatures aren’t conducive to ice remaining solid, but it does contribute to glacier calving, so pieces of ice could be more plentiful. There was almost zero floating ice when we were there, so you saw more, and did more, there than we.