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Tipping at Hotel

I've searched for posts about tipping hotel bellman, maids etc., but I'm not sure the information returned is current. What would be the appropriate amount to tip the bellman for bringing two bags from reception to our room? And, how about a suggested amount for the maid per day? We will be staying at the Intercontinental.

Thanks!

Posted by
18843 posts

In the case of the bellhop, I would feel comfortable with 500 for one bag but not more than 1000 no matter how many bags; unless the guy was pretty special for some reason.

For the maids you might consider a few hunderd a day paid at the end of the stay. So, five nights, maybe 1.000 or even twice that if she folded your skivvies every day. But she wont hate you if you leave nothing.

Those are two easy sums because there are 500 and 1.000 notes. For the maids, you can save all the change you will get and use it. You cant exchange it and 5 pounds coins might only be worth $5.

The general rule in restaurants is to round up to an even number that is at least 10%; but only when you want to show appreciation, and not in fulfilment of any expectation you think the waitperson might have. For taxi drivers 500 is sufficient, maybe more if he talked your ear off with great advice for the next few days. But again, he wont hate you if you dont tip.

Also, look at each note you use carefully. They are different colors, but all those zeros can be confusing.

Also look for the term "szervízdíj" on your bill, usually preceeded or followed by 12,5%. That means the service charge is already on the bill. It's rarely less than 12,5% and sometimes 15% or more (in the tourist traps).

If you said you were staying at the Four Seasons, that might change things, but the Intercontinental is only a nice 4 star.

And there is another little clue in the text above (that I have never seen discussed on the forum) to among other topics, monitary differences between the U.S. and the UK and most of mainland Europe. Lets see who finds it.

Posted by
5688 posts

And there is another little clue in the text above (that I have never seen discussed on the forum) to among other topics, monitary differences between the U.S. and the UK and most of mainland Europe. Lets see who finds it.

A guess. Are you talking about the fact that most of Europe uses a period (e.g., 1.000 is a thousand) where the U.S. and U.K. use a comma? And also most of Europe uses a comma to separate decimals (e.g., 1,98 in Europe is 1.98 in U.S. or U.K.)

Posted by
18843 posts

Laura gets the door prize. 🤣

Tipping in Hungary pre-dates modern day tourism, so its not the American's fault this time, its been the culture for a very long time.

Posted by
4 posts

Thanks for the excellent information.

It takes a day or two for us to acclimate to the differences - commas vs. decimal numbers, but thanks for the reminder.

Cheers!