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Scam artists

What do you do? Look away and say non? Ignore them? Walk faster or run? Throw a punch?

Sorry but we don't deal with a lot of scammers in Boone County.

Posted by
16848 posts

I burst out laughing when they show me the gold ring I just dropped.

Posted by
6872 posts

Take the path of least resistance....ignore, ignore, ignore.
Throwing a punch is the worst you can do and totally unwarranted unless in pure self defense when physically threatened (most scam artists will not physically threaten you).

Posted by
1172 posts

Honestly, I do not understand why you would do anything beyond ignore them?????

Posted by
6630 posts

My response to the 'Do you speak English?' scammers is either to just ignore them 'best' -- or if they are really in my face, I snarl 'Nein.' and stomp on. If you punch one, you are the criminal and are likely to get arrested for assault or perhaps worse yet, encounter their partner who has their back.

It is pretty easy to judge whether someone seeking your help is another confused tourist or a scammer; I have only guessed wrong once. Was approached by a dumpy middle aged woman speaking obviously native English and towing a wheelie suitcase. I thought she was going to ask directions; she was a beggar, who only need 20 Euro for a hotel.

Posted by
5697 posts

Our gold-ring record was FIVE times in a 3-hour span -- three of them in the same location near the Arc de Triomphe.
"Non" usually does it -- if we have to escalate, my husband can switch into German, which seems to work.

Posted by
1843 posts

Sharon I've read reports that it can get aggressive at times. If someone blocks my path or touches me i am fully capable of utilizing physical measures. I am not a girly type of man.

Posted by
8293 posts

You have read reports that “it can get aggressive at times”. Really. Sounds like you are spoiling for a fight so you can “throw a punch”. Always remember, if the police have to intervene, you are a foreigner in a foreign land, so keep the telephone number of the nearest US Consulate handy.

Posted by
2399 posts

I swatted the arm of a woman who tried to pick my husband's pocket when we were in Bologna. I was a few feet behind him and saw it happening.

Posted by
914 posts

Mike, the Sheetz parking lot in Hurricane probably has more aggression in it than your average sidewalk in Paris. Ignore, walk on.

Posted by
1843 posts

Rachel, got it.

And I know want you mean. I have not well represented my intentions in this thread and I apologize.

At the same time I'm not a mousy back down sort of guy.

Posted by
8293 posts

Okay, then! But you sound as if you are expecting to battle your way through throngs of bad guys out to get you. It isn’t like that, but from all the posts on this and other forums about pickpockets, scammers, illegal taxi drivers, etc. you can be forgiven for thinking otherwise. If (when) you go to New York. City or Chicago, do you have the same thoughts about having to get physical? In over 40 years of travel I have had two pickpocket attempts. One was in Prague, and the other was right here in Montreal. Relax and enjoy yourself.

Posted by
4009 posts

Another vote for ignore and keep walking. If asked if I speak English, I’ll start talking in Spanish, saying I don’t understand. In all my travels it’s never been an issue. Enjoy your trip.

Posted by
1804 posts

Honestly, on my last few trips to Paris I hardly saw any of them except for around the Eiffel and Sacre Couer - and it wasn't even like I was traveling in off-season. When they do actually appear, it's easy to just ignore them and keep walking. The only time one ever put a hand on me was one of the friendship bracelet guys over near the funicular going up to Sacre Couer. As usual, I ignored him, said nothing and kept walking past him. This one continued to follow me and then reached out to grab my wrist when he caught up to me.

I just yanked my arm back and started swearing at him loudly (in English). He immediately backed off - they don't want to draw too much attention to what they are up to. I didn't need to throw a punch, and neither do you. Seriously...be alert, but no need to be neurotic that scammers and pickpockets will be popping up everywhere - they aren't. You may want to stop reading some of the crap you are finding on the internet or hearing from other people who just like to be dramatic if all it's doing is making you think you need to be taking names and kickin' ass.

In fact, as homework to counter the nonsense you've been digging up, just go on YouTube and type "David Sedaris Me Talk Pretty One Day Pickapocketoni" into the search field and listen carefully.

Posted by
1222 posts

At the bottom of the Spanish Steps I was once approached by a handsome man who handed me a red rose, telling me with a warm smile that it was a free gift because I looked so nice. I do not consider myself particularly attractive so I was taken aback somewhat, flattered that a man, and an exotic looking one to boot, should be flirting with me. What was I to do? I took the rose from him, half hoping that he would ask where I was staying so that he could call on me later and treat me to a carbonara dinner. A gentleman caller, if you like. I walked away, playing hard to get, but imagine my disappointment when he approached me a minute or so later and requested two euros for the flower. With people looking on in the crowded piazza, I tried desperately to hide my feelings of humiliation, handing him back the rose with all the pride I could muster. My wife, however, was not so polite and she angrily beat him away with her large eyelashes. I can only dream of being a teddy bear instead of the pussycat I am.

Posted by
31471 posts

I normally just tell them "No, I'm not interested" or similar wording, depending on what they're trying to sell. They prefer to operate by subterfuge and without confrontation, so you should have no excuse to punch them.

If they persist, you could always do THIS impersonation.

Posted by
4672 posts

Ok Mike, we get it, you're a big tough guy who can take care of himself but don't worry, you won't need to. It seems like you've worked yourself up to expecting some confrontation for no reason whatsoever.

Posted by
2466 posts

Ignore them and just walk on by. Do not throw a punch - you'll get in trouble with the police.
Make yourself as pickpocket - proof as possible. Then you'll be all right.

Posted by
511 posts

We moved past them - no one blocked our path or threatened us in any way. That said, I would never be the one to throw the first punch (and I'm from West Virginia originally). That would be escalating the situation, which is not how I was raised.

Posted by
8293 posts

Another reason not to “thrown the first punch” is that it could be considered assault, with all the problems that implies for you (a foreigner).

Posted by
3933 posts

You can get good at spotting them as well - last year when we were walking thru the Tuileries, we spotted a young girl with a clipboard in hand ('petition girl') so we just made a wide berth around her and kept on our way. Had the 'deaf and dumb' girls get in our space in Avignon - I just put my hand up (a la - talk to the hand) and kept right on walking. One actually grabbed my husband's arm, but he just shrugged her off and kept going.

The only time I had a struggle with scammers was when we were going up an escalator and when I turned back to make sure my suitcase was firmly perched on the stair, and I saw two girls hit the emergency stop button (it was an early Sun morning, no one else around). The were immediately upon me to 'help' me take my bag to the top. So it was more of a 'get your hands off my bag, I can do it myself' struggle as opposed to a life or death struggle.

Posted by
428 posts

Just keep walking and don't engage, either verbally or with eye contact. I don't think a "non", "nein" or "no" in passing is a problem but what they want is any opening to get you interacting with them. I would strongly encourage you not to be aggressive. As others have said, you don't want to be the aggressor as a visitor in a foreign land.
One time a female panhandler in Paris was being very persistent, shaking a handful of coins in my face as I was talking to my wife, waiting for the bateau bus. I had said no several times, and tried ignoring her but she kept getting in my face, literally. I took the coins from her hand, held them while I finished what I was saying to my wife, then returned the coins and said "no" again. Not smart.
The next day I was physically assaulted on the street by two men because I walked past them when they were demanding money. "Hey, I'm talking to you," was all I heard before I was hit in the back. My natural reaction was to counterattack but I didn't. As I spun around, the camera around my neck swung out, reminding me that it was there. I also saw the alarmed look on my wife's face, which made me picture her watching me get carted away for engaging in a sidewalk brawl.
To make a long story short, I have no doubt that this was retaliation for my actions the day before. I can't prove that, but I've never had anything remotely similar happen in any of our other visits to Paris.

Posted by
11845 posts

I start with ignore, sometimes a soft "Non", unless they get right in my face or make any physical contact (like try to grab your wrist to put a band on it). If they do that, I look them in the eyes, frown, say "Non" and walk away briskly. Not quite a shout but louder than normal conversation. So far that's the most I've ever had to do.

Posted by
1767 posts

OP: I think the incidents you recall hearing about with annoyed tourists are annoyed because having to say NO a couple of times to more than 1 person just ruins the enjoyment of a location. I know it does for me, but have never felt threatened nor ever in a situation where I felt violence or me hitting someone would have improved anything.

Never a need to fight or run ; just ignore first and then if that is not working a firm NO will do.

Paris the scammers are quite rare anyway, Sacre Coeur area the one exception.

Posted by
16883 posts

Wear sunglasses to help you avoid eye contact while remaining aware of your surroundings.

Posted by
1812 posts

My wife and I were in Paris last October. We were only approached once. I "petition girl" appeared out of the blue on the Champs Elyse. I was surprised I didn't see her coming. I said "Non" and did a 360 to look for any accomplices. She moved on to find another mark.

My job requires I have situational awareness training. With a little practice you can spot potential problems and avoid them. I feel I've done a bad job if it gets to the point of engagement. I try to strike a balance between diligence and enjoying the moment.

Yes there are scams in Europe, especially big cities. However I think the nature of the internet tends to exaggerate how big a problem it is. My wife and I make a sport of looking for likely marks. We are amazed at how many clueless tourist targets there are.

Posted by
8293 posts

What about the Gypsy Moth? Is it now a Roma Moth?

Posted by
1843 posts

Just passing along one of dozens-plus of similar stories about physical confrontation...

No, I'm not looking for a fight. As I mentioned I never start a confrontation. Anyway, see below.

Even when hyper-alert, hanging tightly to possessions while entering/departing Metro subway-cars, if you’re holding something in both hands, even front pockets are easily picked. Happened to us twice within 15 minutes.
When reporting theft to police out in a public place (ie. Metro stations), thieves may listen for what wasn’t taken. Minutes after making our verbal report, my husband was again swarmed/bumped while exiting a Metro subway-car. Bullet-train tickets and comb were pick pocketed this time - were they looking for our passports & cellphone that we told police were not taken in the first theft? Soon after that incident, a man steps in front of us, blocking our path, flashes a badge at us, demands to see our passports. We didn't wait to "meet" his buddies that were likely in the wings - by this point, we would only have complied with such a request if it came directly from the President of France himself! We screamed at the man to leave us alone, and dashed away thoroughly shaken.
During our 5 days in Paris, we noticed that Police don’t hang out in the boarding area - where Metro robberies are happening.

False Assumptions:

Pickpocketers work independently. No, two or more hem you in, crush, bump you around, quickly, quietly. (Based on being accosted 3 times within 15 minutes, & thousands of dollars of luxury items immediately charged to our VISA, was this a professional gang?

Posted by
8293 posts

Could you give us the source of those scare stories, please?

Posted by
3304 posts

What do you do? Look away and say non? Ignore them? Walk faster or
run? Throw a punch? Sorry but we don't deal with a lot of scammers in
Boone County.

Scammers are everywhere and probably under your radar in Boone County.

What do I do? Ignore. If I see people getting scammed, I'll tell the people they're being scammed and then just keep walking on my way. Why would you punch somebody? If police are nearby, you're screwed. If the person you punch has a weapon or is stronger than you think physically, you're screwed. Why on earth start a physical confrontation?

Posted by
776 posts

Mike

Gee, did you just make those up otherwise I'm sure that you realize a source for this material is necessary to give it credence. "Passing along stories "just doesn't do it.

Posted by
6630 posts

You can't be pickpocketed if you don't carry valuables in your pockets or backpacks or other easily picked places. Usually you don't even notice; they are skilled. So don't carry valuables in your pockets (including front pockets or cargo pant pockets and certainly not zipped outer pockets on bags or backpacks. And no one cares about getting passports but if it is with other valuables it would be really inconvenient to lose.

Posted by
11845 posts

The wrist band scam seems to be big at Sacre Couer, but I've seen lots of three card monty and people with petitions around Notre Dame. Eiffel Tower is another area you're likely to see some scammers. I can't remember where it was that someone found my ring, that might have been around Eiffel Tower?

Posted by
1812 posts

Gee, did you just make those up otherwise I'm sure that you realize a source for this material is necessary to give it credence. "Passing along stories "just doesn't do it.

Amen. This doesn't jibe with our experience and we used the Metro extensively, including during rush hour on Friday evening! We were careful, but we were surrounded by Parisians trying to get home. It was crowded, but everyone was polite and cooperative. Of course, our stuff was well protected. Deb carried a bag that she wore across her chest. All pockets were zippered and some were well hidden and hard to get to without being noticed.

I think you should be prepared, but I think an attitude adjustment is in order. You are viewing this visit from an adversarial point of view. You will be throwing off some major negative vibes, which may actually attract the kind of attention you want to avoid.

Posted by
3304 posts

Mike

Gee, did you just make those up otherwise I'm sure that you realize a
source for this material is necessary to give it credence. "Passing
along stories "just doesn't do it.

It makes perfect sense to ask for a link to substantiate the source of info given in an online forum.

Posted by
1843 posts

Ok I'll get a link guys lol... Like I would make it up? Why? What would I possibly have to gain?

It was on Fodor's.

Didn't know there was a rule on links but I'll look it up in the morning so as to avoid a public lynching.

Posted by
8411 posts

According to the large exhibit on Gitans (trans. Gypsies) at the Museum of French immigration in Paris, Gitan is the official French term used by the administration and academics. Gypsy is the legal term in England. Roma, Manouche, Sinti, are just a few of the many different groups living in different parts of the world, including North and South America under the umbrella designation of Gitan/Gypsy. The new arrivals in France, that you may run into with a ring or petition, are part of a different group from the Gitans who have been living in France for centuries, Django’s group. Negative attributes to the word Gypsy are recent because it has been both legally and academically acceptable for a long time. Very interesting exhibit, btw, but all in French. I was very surprised by this terminology and many other things. Will I use the word Gypsy with ease after all my pc indoctrination ? Probably not. I’ll take the easy way out and use Gitan.

Posted by
27756 posts

Make sure to hang on to your comb....

First time I've ever seen a scare story about a comb being pickpocketed.

Posted by
1172 posts

I think most people's points Mike is that you want to treat travel to Paris as you would to any other big city anywhere in the world. You want to be aware of your surroundings, not make yourself an easy target, but also not go in with an attitude of " I am ready to throw a punch". There are as many horror stories from people travelling to the US as there are people travelling to Paris or any other big city. I think basic streets smarts go a long way.

Posted by
1843 posts

Sharon, I agree. To me it's just being prudent. I was tongue-in-cheek when I mentioned "punching," but that sort of thing doesn't translate well on the internet without an emoji. Oh, well.

Posted by
4009 posts

Don’t take anything you can’t afford to lose, and definately no “luxury items.” Can’t wait to hear about your trip.

Posted by
1767 posts

BlockquoteDon’t take anything you can’t afford to lose, and definately no “luxury items.” Can’t wait to hear about your trip.
Blockquote

Not to call out the above poster but I think this is bad advise for those who have not been.
This is not a 3rd world country you are going to.

First time I went to Rome I stuck with this advise and convinced my wife to leave her nice purses, all jewelry at home, etc...
Since it was a surprise trip she was fearful I was taking her to god knows where after that advise and of course I also drilled into her that we would be wearing money belts for our credit cards, etc...
After having been there and elsewhere I don't feel anymore one needs to dress any differently or not show shiny, expensive items if that is what you would normally do. If that is a $1500 purse or a $1500 camera if you are mindful of your stuff you are no more likely a target than someone with much less expensive items.

If you planning on taking a crowded subway or bus some additional common sense may be required.

Overall, really it is not different than the safety precautions one would take going to any city in the US.

Parisians dress well, bring and wear what you desire to without fear and just be mindful of your surroundings.
If the fear consumes you by all means take extra precautions.

Posted by
8293 posts

Ah, emma, the voice of reason, as usual. The bravery of those who are so convinced that scammers, thieves, and other rascals await them, and yet still plan trips to Europe, is admirable. Not understandable, but admirable. We can only hope they escape unscathed.

Posted by
8411 posts

** It's really quite bizarre and quite unhealthy.**

Actually, the social media echo chamber is correct, but I think the reason RS has chapters and warnings is because so many of the American travelers come from protected areas where they travel individually behind a steel shell, shop in supermarkets where they leave their handbags in their shopping carts, eat in restaurants without thinking twice about a purse over the back of a chair. And what happens is the warnings, though necessary, sometimes create exactly what you say, sometimes leading to panic. I think all the regulars here have spent a lot of time talking people off the ceiling rather than contributing to it. Living in London, you probably don't run into people who've never taken public transportation, including a train, leave their valuables unattended, and may even leave their front doors unlocked. But that's what's going on.

Posted by
21731 posts

And as I frequently point out -- we have traveled nearly a year in most of the great pickpocket capitols of the Europe over the past 20+ years, haven't lost a thing and to the best of our knowledge (one possible exception) have never had a pickpocket attempt on us or seem a pickpocket in action. Must be going something wrong 'cause they don't like us.

Posted by
524 posts

While your are on your trip in Europe fighting of the pickpockets, someone breaks into your house which has a monitored security system and makes off with some family heirloom. You can only do so much to secure yourself both on your trip and at home. Protect what is most valuable and enjoy your trip. The last time they tried the "gold ring" trick in Rome, my wife saw them before they even approached us and shook her head "no". The "gold ring" scam is getting old, they are gonna have to come up with something new!

Posted by
2917 posts

I'm with Kaeleku, Frank and Bets on this, so I won't reiterate to much (I say but I am verbose these days). But if one is careless with their belongings, is it all the alleged pickpockets' faults?

I have seen gold ring, bracelet and flower scammers. Am I the only one who talks to them without fear? These people or their bosses (unfortunately) are desperate for money. I am not. "Oh, you need the profits from the ring more than I do." My wrists are inaccessible, while I wink at the bracelet people. "If I take that flower, I'm keeping it for free," I say with a smile. (That being said, if they have no sense of humor I will say "va via", which startles them versus really meaning anything, and they leave me alone after giving me a strange look.)

Treat your belongings like you are an adult, and enjoy all the people and your travels. If you are afraid and tend towards violence, then rethink leaving your house. (OK, I sound ornery so I guess I need another cup of coffee).

Posted by
8411 posts

Love Ed's comparison with the house break in--indeed, that worries me much more!

Like Frank after years of travel I've never lost a thing to a thief--except my purse I was using as a pillow stolen out from under my head in a hostel in 1971--dumped in the washroom intact. However, I have to break with Frank because I have seen a lot, but it's not the obvious rings, petitions, bracelets which are easy to avoid with a glare and non.

Because we're in Paris a lot and even have French nationality, we're usually in places where Parisians live and work, and locals are targeted plenty. I won't list all the incidents but it's taken decades to have "seen it all". We've had a few failed attempts on us, we've seen pickpockets make failed attempts, my French sister-in-law who was born and raised in Paris lost her freshly minted ATM money to a "nice man who was asking me for directions" (LOL) where she lives on the Riviera, I saw suburban kids jump and rob a Paris kid at 4:00 pm at Concorde, one of our kids fought another kid in the Metro who was trying to steal his Walkman.... But this is big city stuff. Now, don't get scared. What I saw over the years never happened to a tourists. This is just life in a cosmopolitan big city where rich, poor, fat, thin, tall, and short rub shoulders! And the son who fought for his Walkman in Paris fought a kid in California for his bike. So as they say, stuff happens everywhere. Just don't carry your wallet in your back pocket!

Posted by
524 posts

Just don't carry your wallet in your back pocket!

Ditto. It is in the early evening now, instead of another cup of coffee, I am going to have a glass of wine!

Posted by
11450 posts

Mike.. I found your posts very amusing. glad you are a big strong man who can defend yourself.. I wonder how little old fat out of shape me has managed just fine in Paris ( and Rome and Barcelona.. etc etc) without a big strong man to defend me.

I know.. I IGNORE them.. seems to have worked for the last 35 or so years Ive been visiting Paris as an adult..

Leave your violence at home please..

Posted by
852 posts

It all comes down to statistics and probability: As others have noted, your chances of encountering a scam are pretty high, especially near Notre Dame, Eiffel Tower, and Sacre Coeur and physically and verbally ignoring is a solid way of handling it. Your chances of being accosted and assaulted resulting in a need for self-defense (e.g., throwing a punch) are pretty slim. It could happen as with any other place (when riding the Metro in DC, the crime rate in 2017 was 3.9 per million passenger trips), and you could be one of the unlucky few, however, chances are much better that you won't be. Walking out the door, I take thousand of chances a day, so use anxiety as intended to help minimize risk (I like the sunglasses idea!), and consider yourself well researched and advised on the topic.
By the way, the bravest and cleverest people typically find a way to deescalate a situation, so I wouldn't' consider you "mousy" at all if you found a nonviolent means of handling a scary situation.

Posted by
681 posts

The house break in comparison is interesting, as what amazes me is that every one is so paranoid about their wallet etc., while at the same time posting photos all over the internet, to every one at home about what a wonderful time they are having on holiday. Which is basically saying I am at least an 8 hour flight away, so any house breaker you have loads of time to explore my house and take what you want!!!!! And the privacy settings wont help. I have heard over here in Britain, that some insurance companies will now not cover you for house break ins if they find evidence of you posting that you are away. Food for thought.

Posted by
4672 posts

Wow, after decades of 100+ days a year traveling in Europe, nearly 4000 days by his own estimate, Rick Steves got pick pocketed for the first time? Sounds like the odds are really stacked against the traveler to Europe.

Hammer.....nail.....head

Posted by
8987 posts

Mike check out a series currently on Netflix called Scam City (https://www.netflix.com/title/80073739).
It original aired of the National Geographic Channel, and features scam artists in different cities around the world, the episode about Paris is very enlightening.
Also the Paris Police have their own YouTube page with some instructional video of what you will be up against:
https://youtu.be/OdpFP4UktBU

Keep your excess cash/cards/passport in a money belt underneath your clothes, or the hotel room safe and you'll have defeated most of the bad guys.

Posted by
28 posts

I take the aggressive route when they do not take the initial "no" or ignore. I traveled alone in Paris with two under 10 kids and had a two scammers come up to me (usually when I had stopped and pulled out my map, therefore signaling "Hello, I am a tourist.") I'd say "non" and when they wouldn't go away, I'd take it up a few notches and have them running.

My husband was approached by several Roma girls when he was across the street from me. Once again, I had them running within seconds. Normally, I'm pretty well-mannered in public, but No. Just no.

In any area where scammers try to hand you something, I had both my kids put their hands in their pockets, not make eye contact and refuse to take anything.

Posted by
12898 posts

"What do you do ?" In the past the usual response was to ignore them, just walk on by. Now in the last few years I take a more belligerent attitude. I don't say anything usually, only just stare straight right at them. " They" get the message. In 2007 or 2009 this kid pulled the gold ring scam on me just across the street from the D'Orsay Museum as I was waiting for the light to change.

He shows me this gold right, I give him the proverbial "Gallic shrug" with the look "What do you want me to do with it?" He left totally frustrated and ticked off.

Posted by
1290 posts

When asked If I speak English by an obvious scammer I say "No, sorry I don't" in English and walk away. If asked the same question by a fellow traveler I will engage in normal conversation.
In Rome my husband engaged with a man who was "giving" him a good luck charm ( a little wooden elephant). Somehow the scammer got the item into my husbands hand. We kept on saying no, no, no and tried to hand it back to him, no luck. I finally just took the little elephant and put it at his feet and said "have a great day!" and we walked away. He genuinely appeared to want us to have good luck and happiness, all positive things and he had a beautiful smile, we did not feel scared.
In Paris, on the metro, we did see actual violence. It was late, around 11:00pm and a young man got on the metro, my husband whispered to me "that guy is bad news", I rolled my eyes and said "Profile much?" The young man was antsy and appeared agitated (on drugs?), he sat down, got up and moved past us, sat down again, then up again and approached a man who was seated and started talking aggressively to him in French. The seated man was cool and calm and it looked like he was saying "I don't want any trouble", the aggressive man contained to taunt him, and the seated man again said something like "leave me alone" still calm. The aggressive man kept yelling, pointing at the man and sticking out his chest . At that point other people sitting in that area started getting up and moving away from the two. The standing man started putting his hands on the seated man. The seated man stood up and they yelled at each other for a few seconds then they started swinging and all hell broke loose. The metro stopped, my husband grabbed by hand and said "we are outa here!". This is the only time I have seen actual violence in Paris. It was scary.
The pickpocket/scammer culture is one I do not know and have no need to know about where I live. So when I go to ANY big city (Except Los Angeles, I feel safe there), I am hyper vigilant of my purse and how I access money. If we need to look at a map or to do anything that will distract me, we find a bench, a corner, duck into a side street and do what we need to do.

Posted by
3304 posts

In Paris, on the metro, we did see actual violence. It was late,
around 11:00pm and a young man got on the metro, my husband whispered
to me "that guy is bad news", I rolled my eyes and said "Profile
much?" The young man was antsy and appeared agitated (on drugs?), he
sat down, got up and moved past us, sat down again, then up again and
approached a man who was seated and started talking aggressively to
him in French. The seated man was cool and calm and it looked like he
was saying "I don't want any trouble", the aggressive man contained to
taunt him, and the seated man again said something like "leave me
alone" still calm. The aggressive man kept yelling, pointing at the
man and sticking out his chest . At that point other people sitting in
that area started getting up and moving away from the two. The
standing man started putting his hands on the seated man. The seated
man stood up and they yelled at each other for a few seconds then they
started swinging and all hell broke loose. The metro stopped, my
husband grabbed by hand and said "we are outa here!"

Kudos to your husband for knowing what's what!! One always has to pay attention just like he did.

Posted by
8293 posts

Oh, yeah, it's always a good idea to try to injure someone. The OP's post is about scammers being a nuisance, not endangering your life.

Posted by
1843 posts

Some of these snarky posts are why I keep coming back, my friends.

That and the nasty messages in my inbox.

Big Mike from West by God Virginia!

Posted by
113 posts

My daughter-in-law simply stopped mid-sentence, gave a loud stern “non” when approached at Sacre Coeur by a scammer, and then resumed her conversation with me as if he didn’t exist. Took him by complete surprise...he just stopped & looked completely baffled before focusing on someone else. Must have made an impression on other scammers in the area because none of them approached us after that.

Posted by
1843 posts

I have a friend who was an offensive lineman at the University of Florida. There are benefits from wading through crowds with him.