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France lifts some travel restrictions

(Don't get too excited; you're not on the list)

From the BBC:

France is to ease restrictions on travel to and from seven countries outside the EU, including the UK.
The foreign ministry said a "compelling reason" was no longer needed for travel to Australia, Israel, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, New Zealand and Britain.

Wait, "I wanna go to France, please let me in?" isn't compelling enough for them? It's the creamed corn thing, isn't it? I knew I'd live to regret disparaging creamed corn.

-- Mike Beebe

Posted by
759 posts

Mike - NEVER regret disparaging creamed corn. Disgusting stuff.
Getting into the country is one thing, getting into the Louvre is another. If the Louvre ain’t open, the country ain’t open.

Posted by
7326 posts

The a French have pretty much always considered corn (le maïs) to only be food for livestock, so whether cream style or whole kernel, they’d be aghast at anyone praising or disparaging any canned corn.

What’s probably put the USA out of consideration for inclusion is canned “french cut green beans.” How pretentious, they must be thinking. Oh, and instant coffee and Wonder bread. They probably figure any Americans arriving in France are carrying those substances within their gastrointestinal tract, and would ultimately pollute their fair country.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot American cheese! If the limitations are due to any food-ish developments or attitudes, and not our track record over the past year, then it could be a while. Is getting away from “American ‘cheese’” not sufficiently compelling?

Posted by
10170 posts

Faux. BBC didn’t get it right. The email I received this morning from the député representing overseas French in North America said this applies to only French citizens from these countries. It has nothing to do with citizens from those countries, unless they are dual citizens with France. You can get correct information on the website or subscribe to updates from the député, Roland Lescure.

The député also wrote that this does not apply French citizens from the US and Canada because of the high case numbers and the variants in circulation in North America.

Voila, from his email today.
Concrètement, de nombreuses situations particulières qui nous ont été remontées seront mieux prises en compte, notamment les situations liées à l’éloignement familial, les événements familiaux douloureux ou encore la participation aux concours.
Par ailleurs, au vu de la situation sanitaire de certains pays, le Gouvernement a décidé de lever les motifs impérieux pour les Français en provenance du Royaume-Uni, d'Australie, de Nouvelle-Zélande, du Japon, de Singapour, de Corée du Sud et d'Israël.

Malheureusement la situation sanitaire et la circulation de nouveaux variants en Amérique du Nord ne permettent pas d'inclure, à ce stade, le Canada et les États-Unis dans la liste des pays exemptés de ces restrictions.

Posted by
16155 posts

And I thought French-cut green beans were only available frozen, not in cans. But here youngomif you'd like a dozen cans of the stuff:

https://www.amazon.com/Del-Monte-Canned-French-14-5-Ounce/dp/B00EPO2PJQ/ref=asc_df_B00EPO2PJQ/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=241952581379&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=700176539733637711&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=t&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033282&hvtargid=pla-679726636928&psc=1

I thought all of Europe considered corn to be strictly for livestock feed, until I went to Norwaybin 1993 and saw it used in green salad, along with chopped red bell pepper, and shredded Chinese cabbage instead of lettuce. It seemed to be the standard salad, at least in the homes where we were guests.

And lately the British seem to be crazy for corn on the cob. When my Seattle hiking club hosted a group of hikers from the U.K. about ten years ago, they wanted corn on the cob every night. I was doing most of the cooking and tried to comply, but I could not manage it for the night they camped on the beach in Olympic National Park. Instead, we introduced them to s'mores, which were a big hit. But I am such the French would be aghast at the very idea.

Posted by
7326 posts

Don't get too excited; you're not on the list

... clearly for more than one reason. Still waiting for more developments, which will eventually allow more tourists to visit. But it could be a while, and hopefully there won’t be developments that result in exponentially delayed admittance, for certain nationalities, or for everyone.

France is doing what it needs to do. I’ll keep working thru some of the canned veggies on the pantry shelf in the meantime. Warmer days are approaching, and Olathe corn on the cob should be, too.

Posted by
2942 posts

The trend toward opening up will accelerate in coming months, regardless of what Debbie says.

Creamed corn is a favorite in my dad's old folks' home. Easy to chew (or gum). It's like baby food for adults.

Posted by
2542 posts

According to le Figaro, the easing of restrictions are only for French residents or passport holders and allows them to travel between France and several countries outside the EU without a motif impérieux. Effectively, this rolls back a few of the new restrictions put into place February 1. Up until now, even French citizens have not been able to return to France unless they met a number of strict requirements. This change eases restrictions on French citizens wanting to return to France.

This announcement has absolutely nothing to do with tourism for anyone living outside the EU.

Posted by
5252 posts

And lately the British seem to be crazy for corn on the cob. When my Seattle hiking club hosted a group of hikers from the U.K. about ten years ago, they wanted corn on the cob every night.

I wouldn't say the British are crazy for corn on the cob, perhaps your guests had an unusual penchant for it. We've been eating corn (or sweetcorn as we call it) for years. Typically it's served off the cob, primarily in tins but once we left the 70's behind then bags of frozen sweetcorn became more popular. Corn on the cob is available 'fresh' all year round but usually undressed and in plastic packaging flown in from somewhere in Africa. Only in the summer months will you find British grown corn complete in its husk. I'm not a particular fan of it, I don't really like sweet vegetables but my wife and kids enjoy it and they will happily eat barbecued corn on the cob, charred and slavoured in butter, with their hands (but only in the privacy of the back garden where no-one will see).

Posted by
371 posts

Might as well talk lightheartedly about food since we aren’t going to France anytime soon. The French May just grow field corn, not the tender delicious sweet corn of summer in the US. We travel to enjoy the different favorite foods of the US and overseas. Viva la difference. How about some———- from Australia?. Can’t remember the name this morning. You spread it in buttered toast. Ugg!

Posted by
32683 posts

on toast. on bread. licking the knife. but not on buttered toast.

Posted by
7326 posts

Isn’t “corn” used to describe any grain in Britain, not necessarily just the crop that was used to make Huckleberry Finn’s hollowed-out smoking pipe?

And Marmite = yeast infection?

Posted by
5252 posts

Isn’t “corn” used to describe any grain in Britain

No. Corn is corn or maize. Every other grain has its own name.

Posted by
7326 posts

Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet, but:

https://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst137875_Maize-Vs-Corn.aspx
In the UK, corn is a grain. It commonly means wheat, but it can apply to any grain.Nov 22, 2015
forum.thefreedictionary.com › posts...

... and

https://en.m.wikipedia.org › wiki
The word corn in British English denotes all cereal grains, including wheat, oats and barley. They were designed to keep grain prices high to favour domestic producers, and represented British mercantilism. ... Economic historians see the repeal of the Corn Laws as a decisive shift toward free trade in Britain.

Was there possibly a law forbidding the sale of cream-style corn? It’s the natural relative of mushy peas! Now back to being able to get into France for travel, when conditions allow ...

Posted by
5252 posts

Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet, but:

I don't need to reference the interent but being British I know that corn is corn, barley is barley, wheat is wheat, amaranth is amaranth, oats are oats, millet is millet, rye is rye, sorghum is sorghum and rice is rice. I'm pretty certain that farmers up and down the country know the difference in what they're growing and they don't refer to them all as corn!

Posted by
7634 posts

We lived in Germany form 87-91 and found the locals laughed at Americans eating corn on the cobb. The comment was that is what to feed to the farm animals. It is definitely an American thing and I still love corn on the cobb the best.

Posted by
27041 posts

I've seen street carts selling corn on the cob in Europe. One of them may have been in Zagreb.

Posted by
10170 posts

Times have changed. My French sister-in-law fed me corn on the cob she bought at Intermarché after I served her local midwest corn on her visit to the States. Nice gesture but the French have not developed a palate for the finer nuances of fresh-picked sweet corn and should reserve it for their livestock, as they did before. It's like selling cheese in the States and calling it interchangeably brie or camembert. Doesn't matter what it's called. It's a slab of unripened plaster. Eat local.

Posted by
1131 posts

The key is "fresh-picked." I try to only eat corn on the cob (as we call it in New England) that was picked that same day, and never from a super market. Go right to the source, and in season! Although not necessarily the same day, I also only eat fresh apples and tomatoes in season. No waxed fruit from New Zealand, or hot house wet cardboard pretending to be tomatoes from the grocery.

Posted by
2542 posts

they didn't invent it first.

If he were alive today, I should think that Louis Pasteur would be shocked to learn that not only had an American discovered pasteurization before he did, but that even his name was stolen to describe the process.

Posted by
32683 posts

anti-French nationalism appears to be back in this thread. Maybe not meant that way, but that's how it comes across..

Posted by
9540 posts

Every time I see this topic, it makes me crazy. The chosen “question” / headline is so misleading.

Posted by
2542 posts

That is correct Kim. For those who are not familiar with the announcement details, France only altered restrictions which had been implemented 31 January 21 and only concerned citizens and residents. There was an unfortunate assumption that the changes in some way possibly affected tourism or may be applicable to contributors here which is not the case.

Posted by
374 posts

I’m just worried about Roland Garros. Spectators seem very very unlikely (borderline illegal)