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Decret Airbnb alert

Airbnb is the generic term for short term apartment rentals

According to articles published today (5/11/2017) Registration of rental apartments will be necessary from October of this year.

http://www.20minutes.fr/paris/2065539-20170510-louer-appartement-airbnb-faudra-enregistrer-p

There is also an article in Le Parisien however I can't get the link to work A google of "les propriétaires loueurs devront s’enregistrer dès octobre à Paris" will bring up lots of articles.

Posted by
2241 posts

"75020",

"Airbnb is the generic term for short term apartment rentals"

Respectfully, I disagree as this paints with a very broad brush, is not fair to AirBnB, is simply inaccurate, and should not be encouraged. VRBO, Home Away, and dozens if not hundreds of other agencies rent Paris apartments, legal and not legal.

"According to articles published today (5/11/2017) Registration of rental apartments will be necessary from October of this year."

We have heard this before. It was supposed to have been last September, I think, and that did not happen-although it worked out well for Macron, who apparently was some kind of force behind the effort I have wondered if France's rigorous privacy laws are the nut of the issue and delay. It would be good if they FINALLY got their act together on this so people can enjoy legal rentals without worry-and harassment. Take a look at Barcelona, they have an App where one can plug in an address and get an answer immediately as to a vacation rental's legality:

http://meet.barcelona.cat/habitatgesturistics/en/

Posted by
775 posts

Dave, A reminder, I was acting as the messenger.

Agree that generic term Airbnb is not fair . . .but Paris has chosen to refer to the law in a form of shorthand as Decret Airbnb. I think what Barcelona is doing is serving as an example for Paris. Or, at least, I hope so.

If you have followed this story in all its protracted length, (much before Macron entered the picture) the process has been seemingly endless and, as you point out, has left many subjected to needless worry. The nut of the issue is the French Legal Process itself.

My immediate experience:
In the building where I live it took 20 years to settle an owner's estate. Meanwhile we other owners were responsible for paying the apt. charges which were, after 20 years, well above what the state allowed us to collect from the estate settlement . . . . French law.

Posted by
1619 posts

We rented a wonderful room via the Airbnb site last fall. The apartment was registered and very legal.

Posted by
11028 posts

It would be good if they FINALLY got their act together on this so
people can enjoy legal rentals without worry-and harassment

That assumes that is what the French want. Maybe they don't? Maybe they will want to restrict short term rentals in an effort to keep housing costs down?

Posted by
2241 posts

James, I'm not sure that will be such an issue when the law is actually working. Citizen access is in part what the law is about. It is fairly involved, and very expensive, to satisfy requirements for legal rental.

Posted by
2466 posts

The average short-term rental unit measures 37 square meters and costs an average of 1300 € per week.

This is far in excess of the City's rent control ceilings.

A long-term residential unit of the same size would rent for 900 € per month.

Difficult to say how this "affects the housing shortage in Paris."

The facts are that corporations own multiple units in one or more buildings, nobody actually resides in them full-time, and this is the reason that the person who sells a tourist his morning croissant has to take an hour to get home to the suburbs instead of living in the neighbourhood where he works.

Posted by
1412 posts

The fact is money talks, you will never stop this though it's cute you are trying. From AirBNB to rich foreigners laundering their money in real estate, every single desirable urban core or neighborhood around the world is going through this process. I went hiking today on Oahu. The trail starts in the most exclusive gated community in the island, I haven't been there in 15 years. Every single person I saw was foreign Chinese. Entire apartment buildings downtown are being marketed to and sold only to Chinese, where at night out of say 100 apartments maybe two or three have lights on. So good luck with your rules, your greedy countrymen are the ones selling you out.

Posted by
2558 posts

People tend to conflate two different but related issues -- so called ghost apartments and vacation rental apartments. The changes or enforcement of short-term rental restrictions do not affect ghost apartments. They belong to the super rich and celebrities who won't rent them out and who don't need to rent them. There are exceptions of course to my generalizations about the owners but the main point is that these apartments are off the rental market. And requiring registration for rentals or other hurdles will not affect them. There is a big number of those just like there are in NYC and Oahu and even here in Palo Alto.
The enforcement and the rules are really IMO aimed at the middle and low market owners who do short-term rentals. The powers that be in Paris have decided that the renting of those apartments to vacationers has removed them from the permanent rental market and driven up the prices for locals. That could be true and seems logical and reasonable (supply and demand being what it is) but it sort of ignores the fact that France has landlord-tenant laws, including restrictions on the amount of rent that can be charged, that make NYC and San Francisco laws look pro landlord. Who would not prefer to rent out a space for 2 or 3 times more to a tenant who has no rights?

Posted by
7259 posts

"A long-term residential unit of the same size would rent for 900 € per month."

chexbres, which arrondissements?
This seems really low but it's good news for me.

Posted by
2558 posts

Re: Long Term Rental Rates vs Short Term Rental Rates
I own an approximately 60 square meter apartment in the 4th arrondissement. The long-term rental that agents were suggesting is between 2,100€ and 2,400€ per month. A friend who owns an apartment in a building on the same street that is smaller but is one floor higher and has better views rents that space out for 160€ or more per night, depending on the time of year. His apartment is probably rented about 3 weeks of every month and he refuses to consider renting to locals because he says that he makes 2 to 3 times as much money renting to vacationers. AirBnB is great for him because he lives in another apartment in the building and so coordinating with arriving and departing renters is not a big hassle.
Some places are expensive and people who have certain jobs cannot afford to live in the town where they work. That has been happening in New York City for decades, for example, and is definitely the case in parts of the San Francisco Bay Area. I live in Palo Alto and the only teachers and fire fighters and police officers who can afford to live here have either owned their property for ages, inherited from parents, or are married to (or divorced from) high income earners. The woman who makes copies at the local Fed Ex drives over 90 minutes to get to work. Paris is not alone. The lack of affordable housing in city centers is a problem for desirable and expensive cities/communities -- see Venice, San Francisco, New York, to name three.

Posted by
2466 posts

The 11ème, 13ème, parts of the lower 12ème and some sections of the 14ème have long-term rentals averaging 900€ for a 37 square meter apartment. The 20ème can average a little less.

Posted by
7259 posts

Thanks chexbres and JHK, appreciate the helpful info. I'm considering moving to Paris when I retire. I'll buy an apt, rather than rent, but this is good info as I ponder my choices.

Posted by
2466 posts

Prices of "anciennes pierres" - old buildings - evolve constantly, especially in the Marais, Latin Quarter, and around any major monument.

Prices of "immeubles modernes" - modern buildings, built around 1988 or so - don't change too much, because nobody wants to live in them unless they have been forced to do so.
Prices of the really new "immeubles modernes" are sky-rocketing, because everybody and their mama wants to live in them.