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Can we bring our own champagne to the top of the Eiffel Tower?

I love the idea of sipping bubbly above Paris, but it sounds like their Champagne Bar is pretty tacky. Can we bring our own bottle up?

Posted by Sam
Green Bay
11632 posts

I think you'll lose it at the security line. Go with the tacky plastic flute they sell up top. It has a pointy bottom so you can only set it down in the little holders along the rail. Save the champagne connoisseurship for a less restrictive venue.

Posted by Norma
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
6854 posts

The champagne at the bar may be tacky but bringing your own up to the top of the Eiffel Tower is a tiny bit tacky, too.

Posted by Kathy
United States
7070 posts

According to the visitor instructions, which can be downloaded from a page of Eiffel's website (link below; click "download here" under "safety instructions" ), "glass bottles, drink cans" are not allowed. As I've never seen champagne in anything but a glass container, the answer would be no. :O)

https://www.toureiffel.paris/en/rates-opening-times

Posted by janettravels44
Chicago
4090 posts

I'm not seeing how buying a glass on the tower is more tacky than taking your own up. They have airline like security so no.

Posted by joe
Edmonds, WA
2156 posts

I suppose you could put champagne in your plastic water bottle. (?)

Posted by Ken
Vernon, Canada
28360 posts

I suspect they don't want heavy glass bottles at the top of the tower, for safety reasons. If one were ever dropped by a "tipsy" guest, it could do some serious damage.

Posted by chexbres
Paris
2459 posts

There is a "grille" all along the top of the Eiffel Tower.
There are serious security checkpoints which don't allow food or drinks.

On the other hand, you can bring your own Champagne on the cruise boats for free.

Posted by Southam
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
2482 posts

Wine experts can correct me on this, but I have read that a quick rise in altitude does bubbly wine no good anyhow.

Posted by Sam
Green Bay
11632 posts

The Champagne at the Eiffel Tower is hand carried by genuine Sherpas from Nepal who take 4 days to get it to the top on the stairs, thus not bruising the bubbly ;-)

Posted by Bets
Deep in the heart of Indiana
5094 posts

Transport of any wine is detrimental because it contains living organisms.

But champagne is in bottle thick enough to contain the bubbles, so the Sherpas can take the stairs two steps at a time if so desired.

Posted by Barbra
Burbank, CA
299 posts

What I thought was bogus at Tour Eiffel was that I couldn't just go into the restaurant and have a glass of wine and gaze out the window.

Nope, you have to have lunch, mon amie. Granted, it was lunchtime, but still.

Posted by Norma
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
6854 posts

Most restaurants anywhere don't look kindly on people occupying a table at meal time just to have a glass of wine or a coffee. I would think especially at a place like the Eiffel Tower. Of course, you could always plan your visit for a time when you would be welcome to just have a glass of wine, or maybe two.

Posted by janettravels44
Chicago
4090 posts

Barbara, you can't be serious. Restaurants in the US don't let you go to a view spot and occupy a window during meal times with a glass of wine either. And restaurants in Paris are not going to allow you to occupy a table regardless of view at meal time without ordering a meal. You might find a bar that does this, that being what bars do, but restaurants are not in the business of providing people with low cost seating when they aren't ordering a meal. Everyone would happily sit an occupy all the seats in the restaurants on the Eiffel Tower without ordering meals if they could; some business model that is.

Posted by Alexander
Macon, GA
695 posts

The champagne at the bar may be tacky but bringing your own up to the
top of the Eiffel Tower is a tiny bit tacky, too.

Another one dished out by Mlle Judgemental. If their life dream is to experience champagne at the top of a famous landmark, so be it!

All I have to say is: à votre bonne santé. Have an amazing trip.

Posted by JHK
Palo Alto, California, United States
1670 posts

"If their life dream is to experience champagne at the top of a famous landmark, so be it!" If their life dream is to experience champagne at the top of a famous landmark, they can achieve it by buying champagne from the bar.

Posted by rankster
Nebraska
333 posts

Yes you can! I and my two friends brought wine and glasses to the top and toasted each other there in September! (and we're NOT Sherpas ;-) )

The rules about bringing drinks to the top are pretty vague at best. Believe me, I read the rules! The main concerns are litter or potentially hazardous materials at the top. Hazardous meaning glass, plastic or metal scratching, bumping or poking against other people on the crowded elevators (sardine time) and bustling balconies. Naturally too, they'd rather you buy an overpriced glass of champagne from their bar, but you are not required to buy nor are you prohibited from bringing your own. You are allowed to bring stuff to the top, but know that whether it actually gets to the top with you is at the discretion of the security guards on duty.

After carefully reading the rules and regulations, I purchased a collapsible wine/champagne bag online (cheap) and also some silicone drinking glasses. We wanted to drink wine at the top of the Eiffel at night and enjoy the city lights below us- which is exactly what we did. We purchased tickets the day they became available for one of the last entry times of the evening. Shortly before leaving our hotel we poured our wine into the collapsible bag. My one friend was able to clip it onto his belt buckle as we walked to the tower. We carried the glasses in my camera bag. We arrived shortly before sundown, got through security just fine (we showed them our things and they smiled and complimented our cleverness). We enjoyed the views from each level as the sun went town. At the top we admired the views again, saw the terrible crowds at the bar indoors (away from the views) and gave thanks we weren't wasting our time (and money) there. My friends and I found a relatively peaceful spot, poured our drinks, and toasted each other and Paris with its stunning nighttime views. It was one of my favorite moments of my trip. We took pictures of each other and recorded a brief video of our toast with the lights behind us and the blinking of the tower lights as they sparkled.

I hope you get your special moment above Paris as well! Let me know if I can answer any questions for you!
Cheers!
Lisa

Posted by chexbres
Paris
2459 posts

Well, that's the same thing as drinking from those plastic glasses...
And that's a lot of trouble to go to...
Like drinking from a plastic bag would "taint" the Champagne somehow.
If you have a decent bottle of Champagne, it doesn't deserve this treatment.

Posted by Bets
Deep in the heart of Indiana
5094 posts

So bottom line, depending on the guard on duty, you can bring a boda bag or plastic water bottle filled with something and some sort of plastic glass to the top. What would Dom Pérignon say?

Posted by janettravels44
Chicago
4090 posts

so you can smuggle champagne to the top of the tower if not caught by the security people and do so in a plastic bag? I'll bet that is great. And I am guessing that a plastic wine bag and glasses plus the champagne will end up costing more than just buying a couple of plastic coupes on the tower -- which will be fresh and chilled and bubbly. I can imagine how wonderful a decent champagne will be after being decanted into a plastic wine bag and then hauled up the tower.

Yeah a plastic coupe of champagne is not the height of elegance, but it is a noche or two up from wine in a plastic bag.

Posted by Kim
Paris
3184 posts

In a silicone "glass"!!!! No thanks!!!

I'm still chuckling about the Sherpas and their four-day climb (which is probably how long it would take me to climb up normally, unburdened).

Posted by rankster
Nebraska
333 posts

Why are you people so condescending and Grinchy? Lighten up!

We "smuggled" nothing since BYO is permitted. My friends and I had a little "dream" to toast each other at the top of the Eiffel. We read the rules, followed the rules and lived our simple little dream. If Paris has nothing against it, why should you? The champagne bar is there for those who want it at 13-22Euro per glass. We just decided we'd rather bring our own (since we prefer wine to champagne) and avoid waiting in a long line at a crowded bar when we could be outside in the Parisian night air enjoying the views. The wine tasted fine and we regretted nothing. As I stated before, its one of my favorite memories. So naturally when the OP asked the question and got a bunch of mis-information and snark, I wanted to set things straight. mrswirth can make up her own mind as to whether its the right thing for her to do, and how important it is for her to do it. If she decides to proceed, HOW she does so is key. Joie de vivre!

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays.
May we all enjoy some kindness and peace.
Lisa

Posted by Kathy
United States
7070 posts

We just decided we'd rather bring our own (since we prefer wine to
champagne).

Lisa, possibly the fact that what you decanted into the bag was wine versus champagne may have been overlooked by some folks? If one wanted to toast the view but preferred one over the other, I can see the sense in a BYOB. I'd also guess that wine would survive the transfer from bottle to bag much better than bubbly might.

Champagne sans most of its tickle wouldn't be much fun, no? 🥂

Posted by chexbres
Paris
2459 posts

I'll bet the wine was warmer than it should have been...given the circumstances.

Posted by andrewesque
30 posts

I think people are being snarky because the OP called the champagne bar "tacky," when most people would agree that bringing your own wine is also pretty "tacky." I think if she had just asked the question, there would still have been some snark, but less so.

Posted by Bets
Deep in the heart of Indiana
5094 posts

andrewesque has brought up a good point, but I think the bottom line is what my French husband blurted out when I told him about this thread: "That's so American." And the people who are the coldest to the idea of a boda bag and silicone glasses are the ones with the most French experience or hold resident or dual nationality status. The reason may be that we know both the US and southern Europeans culinary cultures, where most booze is at the dining table. They/we would most likely spend the 13euros for a glass served at the bar because "that's the way things are done" or that's the way those of us with a lot of experience in France have been conditioned. BYO is a very American way of thinking. But...I continue....

However, the the more my husband spoke, the more he celebrated what makes up this American mentality: he ventured into the US drive for ingenuity, looking to break convention, doing things our own way, maybe doing it more inexpensively, the RS way, which are all very positive attributes. This is a nice way to toast the city for students or those with low budgets. I remember the first Eastern Europeans coming after the Wall fell. They had to bring all their own food with them and slept in their coaches, but they got to see and experience Paris.

So I hope I've been able to explain some of the underlying tension and snark.

Posted by Herbster
Michigan
30 posts

Hey, I was a member of the party that took the wine to the top of the tower! It was totally cool. I never considered if it was a chic thing to do or not. Nor did I really care. Although I would never conduct myself in a manner that would inspire the concept of the ugly American, I also am not concerned about doing something that others might pooh-pooh. It not was not really a matter of saving money either, as we had enough of that. We are not the on a shoestring budget, backpacking, hostel type of travelers. (Not that there's anything wrong with that.) We just felt like taking the BYOB challenge and we successfully did so. We did it, it worked, and you can do it too if you want to. We are merely the voice of experience here, emparting our knowledge to those whom inquire. If you want to rock your own alcohol at the top of the Eiffel, then do it!

Posted by Bets
Deep in the heart of Indiana
5094 posts

And happy Festivus to you, whether you drink from the bottle, a plastic cup, a Libbey glass, or Baccarate crystal.

Posted by immacdonell
29 posts

Hey "rankster". Don't let the trolls get you down. If it's okay with security, no worries. "You can't please everyone, so you got to please yourself" - Rick Nelson

Posted by Barbra
Burbank, CA
299 posts

The BYOC in a bag thing reminds me of many things I've seen/read about American GIs in World War II--that ability to think outside the bag, er, box, not wait for orders on every little thing, and do what needs to be done.