Please sign in to post.

Budweiser Beer in France

Hmmm, I received an email notification this evening with a new comment on my prior question and thread on the above subject. As I have not checked in with the forum for some time, I discovered that this topic had been closed due to inactivity, the last comment on the thread listed as May 16, 2018. As much fun as that topic was, the thread had 115 posts, I have to continue the discussion in this new thread.

My trip to London and then on to Paris and Normandy took place in late July/early August, 2019. I loved every second of this special journey, and I would definitely be keen to return. Bayeux was our home base in the Normandy region, and I felt I could linger there forever.

I'm happy to announce that my travel partner on this special trip to Paris and the Normandy region not only found Budweiser (regular Bud) in various locations, but he also tried a number of new brews and found several that met with his approval. An old dog did, in fact, learn a new trick.

Cheers!

Posted by
4719 posts

Excellent news!

Regarding the notification of new activity, quite often a spam post will be added to a thread which will result in a notification of new activity to the author and also send it to the top of the new posts list. If the post is subsequently removed by an administrator then the thread will revert to its previous state which in this case was closed due to inactivity.

Posted by
2333 posts

In today's world, the USA is the leading country for beer. The average small-to-medium market in the USA has much better beer than does Munich or many places in Germany. That's due to the rise of microbreweries.

In my small town of Sioux Falls (~ 200,000), there are 12 breweries, all small. I can go to more than 12 bars, which all have at least 10-40 different types of beers. The Rheinheitsgebot, the German "beer purity" rule, is not just considered, but very strictly obeyed, since most of the brewers began as beer fanatics. They put no preservatives, no additives, no garbage in the beer. They do add odd things like pumpkin or other additives, but these do not adulterate the beer.

In Munich and much of Germany, there are dominant large breweries. At Octoberfest, you get a beer, and it's 1 of 6. The style is very similar. I understand that small breweries are coming up in many German cities to break the monopolies of the large breweries and the pilsner style.

However, seeking a "American large brewer" beer in Europe is nuts, IMHO. Drink local. I used to live in St Louis, and I never drank a Belgian-Brazilian beer (Anheiser-Busch is now a Belgian-Brazilian company). I drank local beers, like Schlafly and Boulevard.

Posted by
37 posts

@Ufkak, I suppose it's one of life's mysteries. Chalk it up to the list of things we may never have an understanding of in our lifetime and beyond! :)

Posted by
37 posts

@Paul-of-the-Frozen-North, I agree. I have been a huge fan of microbrewed beer for a long time now, and I have enjoyed the market being filled with a lovely variety of those brews to choose from. Drinking local is the way to go, and I was pleasantly surprised to find a number of really tasty beers in France. I actually enjoyed the beer there more than the wine, and I never thought that would be the outcome.

Like I mentioned, my travel partner was a champ and tried new offerings. But he was like a kid in a candy store when he was able to get back to his roots and drink his beloved Bud every now and then as we stumbled upon them in random pubs/restaurants.

Posted by
1873 posts

And a good time was had by all. Thanks for the update.

Posted by
2540 posts

Edgar I have visited the brewery in Ceske Budejovice several times, superb beer and compared to the so called King of Beers it is so far above it in quality and taste that it just cannot be compared.
I have never understood why people seek out what they can get at home when travelling but each to their own.

Beer is one of my favorite travel topics. I'm not surprised by the Budweiser in Europe since In-Bev is a Belgian company; Belgium is next door to France. UfKak - you have a sense of humor. I learned that beers in different regions have different characteristics, flavors. Hard to have a favorite. So many beers, so little time! The MidWest, USA is kicking out some great beers these days.

Posted by
21859 posts

Remember ---- Life is too short to drink cheap beers!!!!!

Posted by
1966 posts

When I go to a brewery or bar, I ask the bartender or waitperson for their opinion. I want something different. Something I've never had before.

Posted by
21859 posts

Nick, it is a cultural thing. For the most part I don't think the majority of US beer drinker have a taste for beer beyond the pale lager typical of Bud, Miller, Pabsts, etc. That is typical of what most drank in high school and college. The growth of micro-brewers of the past decade or so has introduced a much wider variety of beer styles and tastes. So I think a lot of older drinkers are trying to branch out with different styles and flavors. Hence, the appeal of 40 brands.

Posted by
37 posts

@BigMikeWestByGodVirginia, Yes, that is Bud's famous marketing line. While I argue against that point, I am happy to have so many choices that please my palate. Definitely something for everyone!

Posted by
37 posts

@Denny, Yes, indeed! We had a fabulous time with the most wonderful memories. Must return!

Posted by
37 posts

@Edgar, we actually brought a bottle of this original Bud home. Found at a cute pub in Caen, brought a bottle home unopened to keep!

Posted by
37 posts

@UncleGus, well there are those who are satisfied with their routine, never veering too far off course. However, as I mentioned earlier, he did try a number of other beers and found several that were satisfying to him. A+ for effort!

Posted by
6513 posts

"I can go to more than 12 bars, which all have at least 10-40 different types of beers"

To be honest that sounds awful.

Nick, in the US many people like to get their 'tap' beer to take home with them so many bars also serve as 'fill' stations - what we call growler fill stations, growlers being the 2 liter bottles used to take home beer. Therefore a lot of bars carry craft beers (and ciders) from several different local breweries, in addition to the standard well known big brewery brands. Several of the bars and growler fill stations in my area of Oregon offer as many as 20+ brews, one often has as many as 50 brews available.

EDIT: I was gently corrected about my incorrect statement that the growlers were gallon bottles, I have corrected that. Guess I was just wishful thinking. :)

Posted by
80 posts

Beer is 1 of the reasons I travel.
Doesn't matter where i am in the world , I will try a new beer
I keep track of all my beers at untappd
https://untappd.com/user/Travellingwithtroy

A funny story about bud
it was my favorite beer when i was in my teens/early 20's but now i would never touch it
on my 1st backback trip which was 5 weeks through the UK
3/4 of the way through the trip i was in belfast , i just got off the bus and was looking for a place to stay.
During my walk i saw a sign 3 buds for 5 Euros in a pubs window and was getting sick of paying 5 Euros for 1 beer. Made a mental note of the pub was in the mood to drink.
A little later that night , i ended up at the pub and sat at the bar.
I asked the bartender if the sign in the window was right , he sad yes . so i order 6 buds
I remember that night clearly as i laughed my ass off that i was drinking crappy bud in a great beer drinking city. I even called my friends to laugh at me that night.
Great memories from that night , thanks for getting me to recall that night and trip

a great glasgow beer story a couple of days later after leaving belfast

Posted by
37 posts

@Sun-Baked in Florida, true. So many beers, so little time. Was in Belgium some years back (2007ish?), and was blown away by the brews there. Another destination to revisit. It's always interesting trying the various brews of different regions.

Posted by
37 posts

@Nick, for some it is much fun to see so many choices! And makes for great revisits of those pubs. As always, personal preference. But I love perusing the coolers or the wall full of taps and sampling or trying a new beer.

Nancy,
I like the idea of pubs as "fill stations" for growlers. What a great idea!
I try to pair my beer to my food or activity. For example, do I need to function after my beer or will I be heading for the couch? Is it hot and Summer time or a chilly Fall evening? I have sworn off beers with alcohol content over 9%. I do enjoy sipping a lovely, rich dark stout with a creamy head. I like a wide range of beers. Not a fan of IPAs though.

One time, I ordered a beer and my husband ordered a cocktail. When the server brought out the drinks, the server assumed the beer was for my husband and the cocktail for me. I have heard of that happening to other women as well.

If I were to join a religious order, it would have to be one that makes beer. We can thank the monasteries and convents of Europe for their contributions to beer culture.

Posted by
6021 posts

The Rheinheitsgebot, the German "beer purity" rule, is not just considered, but very strictly obeyed

Actually, in the US, like in Belgium, No, US brewers do not follow the Rheinheitsgebot. The issue with the the German standards is that is does not allow deviation from tradition. A Pumpkin beer would not meet the requirements, as would many of the favorite American Microbrews, both in ingredients and process. It is not a matter of "Purity" or "adulteration" or other fake ingredients, it is simply a restriction to only select malted grains (Barley and Wheat), Hops, Yeast, and Water.

I like German beers, but a beer trip there is tasting the same four beers over and over, with a few exceptions (Rauchbier, Kolsch, Berliner Weisse, Gose in Leipzig) If you want variety in beer, skip Germany, go to Belgium, Netherlands, or the Czech Republic, or take in the growing UK beer scene.

Posted by
6513 posts

If I were to join a religious order, it would have to be one that makes beer. We can thank the monasteries and convents of Europe for their contributions to beer culture.

I agree, me too. And we have a Benedictine Brewery at Mt Angel Abbey in Mt Angel, Oregon. And when we've had enough beer we can go the Brigittine Monastery in Amity Oregon were they make the most scrumptious chocolates. You got to hand it to those monks, they know how to make people happy.

Posted by
745 posts

Nancy....all those RS meetings at Panera Bread in Tualatin? Why weren't we gathering at a brew pub?

Posted by
1966 posts

Amen, Mr. Dower. The old time version of Stroh's, Pabst Blue Ribbon, and even Budweiser are not of the quality they were back in their heyday 50 years ago. Or so I've been told. Grandpa was a Stroh's man, and damn proud of it. He was from Detroit where it was brewed.

I remember the old saying: "Red neck, white socks, and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer." It was probably toxic masculinity from the World War II vets.

Agree with Paul about German beer. It's basically 4-6 different beers by taste. American breweries have exploded with options.

Posted by
2333 posts

Actually, in the US, like in Belgium, No, US brewers do not follow the Rheinheitsgebot. The issue with the the German standards is that is does not allow deviation from tradition. A Pumpkin beer would not meet the requirements, as would many of the favorite American Microbrews, both in ingredients and process. It is not a matter of "Purity" or "adulteration" or other fake ingredients, it is simply a restriction to only select malted grains (Barley and Wheat), Hops, Yeast, and Water.

OK, maybe not in the letter of the Rheinheitsgebot, but in the spirit. Only real things are put in beer.

Perhaps some of you remember the 70s and 80s, where US beers competed not on quality but on cheapness and shelf life. They put rice in the beer. Still do in some - Bud among them. They also put in many chemicals, to the point where Schlitz started having a snowy reign of particulate garbage in the beer.

The revolution began with home brewing in the 1980s, where you could get a kit and brew your own. I made many batches. After I learned to make wine, I stopped making beer. Wine is so easy to make, and beer actually takes skill to get the max out of the mash.

Probably the most important book in brewing was "The complete joy of home brewing". Certainly an early book. It explained everything. Plus had good recipes. After changes in the law to allow small breweries, things took off.

If everyone used the Rheinheitsgebot as the final word, life would be very boring. But if you keep the spirit (no crap in the beer) while possibly not following the letter of the law, you can brew a real good beer.

Posted by
2333 posts

To be honest that sounds awful. Unless you're at a beer festival, why would one want such a choice? It's like going into one of those Paris "bistro" restaurants where the menu runs to five pages

Not really awful. I am an IPA drinker primarily. So, a menu with 40 beers will have brown ales, sour beers, IPAs, Belgian beers, and so forth. There will be maybe 3 IPAs. I have 3 beers, I'm done for the night.

Posted by
2333 posts

Amen, Mr. Dower. The old time version of Stroh's, Pabst Blue Ribbon, and even Budweiser are not of the quality they were back in their heyday 50 years ago. Or so I've been told. Grandpa was a Stroh's man, and damn proud of it. He was from Detroit where it was brewed.

Back in the day, I too drank Stroh's if I had a choice. The American beer scene was so limited in choices then however. I remember drinking Ballantine's Ale and being completely blown away. Now that I know something more about beer, I realize that it was a poor mass-market cousin of an IPA - hop-heavy, a little spicy, with a fruity top-note. Haven't seen it in many years.

Posted by
37 posts

A funny story about bud
it was my favorite beer when i was in my teens/early 20's but now i would never touch it
on my 1st backback trip which was 5 weeks through the UK
3/4 of the way through the trip i was in belfast , i just got off the bus and was looking for a place to stay.
During my walk i saw a sign 3 buds for 5 Euros in a pubs window and was getting sick of paying 5 Euros for 1 beer. Made a mental note of the pub was in the mood to drink.
A little later that night , i ended up at the pub and sat at the bar.
I asked the bartender if the sign in the window was right , he sad yes . so i order 6 buds
I remember that night clearly as i laughed my ass off that i was drinking crappy bud in a great beer drinking city. I even called my friends to laugh at me that night.
Great memories from that night , thanks for getting me to recall that night and trip

a great glasgow beer story a couple of days later after leaving belfast

@travellingwithtroy, great story! Thanks for sharing. Remembering my first European trip, to Ireland, and being stunned noting that every pub I visited offered Budweiser. I could not understand it at all. Loved having fresh Guinness or Murphy's each day and laughed wondering why anyone would think of drinking Bud!

Posted by
37 posts

@Paul-of-the-Frozen-North - I don't think I have ever had Stroh's, but I remember Schlitz being a big deal when I was a kid. First beer I ever tasted. Very happy that brewing has come a long way.

You mentioned Detroit. My dad was from Saginaw, and I believe his uncle was a brew meister up there, perhaps in Detroit.

Oh, and it is Ms. Dower, to clarify. LOL.

Cheers!

Nancy,
Beer and chocolate may make celibacy worth it! Sounds like you are in a great location for microbrews. The Midwest is doing a fine job of reviving microbreweries.

Posted by
37 posts

@Sun-Baked in Florida, @Nancy, beer and chocolate were made for one another! I love it.

Posted by
1966 posts

No, ma'am. It's chocolate and milk.

Beer with nuts or chips, or if you're far enough gone just about anything. Thank you. And you're welcome.

I'd recommend baked or grilled chicken if you're going to get your beer on.

Posted by
37 posts

@BigMikeWestByGodVirginia, sorry, but I have enjoyed the beer and chocolate combo for a very long time. I've introduced quite a few friends to the pairing as well.

Posted by
2251 posts

Beer + chocolate?

Approved!

Hey OP!
Is there a particular beer that you pair with a particular chocolate? This is a need to know the answer type of question.

Posted by
6513 posts

A number of brew pubs also serve chocolate stout milkshakes and floats in the summer. I know the ones I've had in Oregon have been delicious so I guess beer and chocolate do go together - at least for some of us.

Posted by
8510 posts

Just saw a pack of Bud sitting on the shelf next to the Belgian brews in my local SPAR here in France. Amazed by the progress of our civilization.

Edgar and Nancy,
I may have to trek out to Oregon. Toasted coconut! Chocolate Stout Milkshakes and floats! Humans are capable of evolving ... Maybe there is hope for the human race yet!

Bets,
I laughed at your comment about Budweiser next to Belgian Brews. That's a case of the human race digressing. The monasteries and convents in Belgium have been making top notch beer for hundreds of years - long before the USA was even a country.