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Budweiser beer

My travel partner only drinks Budweiser. Can anyone offer help with finding Budweiser in Paris or other towns?

Posted by
118 posts

Perhaps you can purchase it at the airport duty free outbound. There is always plenty of liquor to purchase
not sure I saw beer however. Peronni beer tastes very close to Budweiser perhaps they will give it a try.
Good Luck.

Posted by
37 posts

Thank you. He is set in his ways, unfortunately. I am hopeful to find the Budweiser for him. I, on the other hand, try anything.

Posted by
1844 posts

I once knew a guy that only drank Pabst Blue Ribbon beer. Maybe coffee in the morning. Of course this was a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.

I've since wondered how he could do that and remain alive.

Posted by
37 posts

MikefromWestVirginia, my friend is similar. His heart is gold, so I will try to find a way to satisfy his stubborn taste buds for this trip.

Posted by
37 posts

Edgar, France only for this special trip. I definitely found Budweiser in Ireland.

Posted by
4673 posts

View it as a means of weaning him off that dreadful beer. I'm sure he's not going to forego a beer simply because he can't find Budweiser. The most widely available lager in France is Kronenburg, not one I would generally opt for but decent enough for slaking a thirst and certainly an improvement on Bud. If he can bring himself to try the original Budweiser he'd be doing his beer palate a very good favour.

I'd be very surprised if he remains resolute in his insistence in only drinking one brand of beer, if he does then he's one stubborn man!

Posted by
37 posts

JC, I am afraid there is little that can be done to sway him. He is a true Bud man (Budweiser, not light). No problem with food, trying new cuisine. But he will not budge on his beer. Bound and determined to find Budweiser.

I will be the one trying all of the wines and beer offerings that are available. When in France...

Posted by
4673 posts

Ah well, at that age I'm afraid all may be lost but here's hoping for an epiphany!

Posted by
783 posts

First of all: gross.
Second of all: Budweiser can be found everywhere in England and France.
Third: try to get him to try some local brews!

Posted by
37 posts

Darrenblois,

First: agree
Second: Good to know I will be able to buy
Third: Not much of a chance where beer is concerned. Anything else, yes.

Thank you.

Posted by
3275 posts

The Bud you're seeing as available in Paris may well be the real European Bud, not the beer (ish) American version he's so keen on. You may be able to buy the American stuff at Duty Free on the way over, or in a maket, but then what? It's not like he can haul a cooler around with him so he can have a cold one when you stop for a meal or a drink at a cafe.

Posted by
1423 posts

Reminds me of a Monty Python joke:

Drinking American beer is like making love in a canoe -- it's f*****g close to water.

Posted by
1844 posts

It's amazing how this thread just took off.

I think the question now is will the European version of Budweiser be sufficient.

Posted by
4637 posts

Which Budweiser? The real one from Budweis (Ceske Budejovice) or the one from St.Louis (also called yellow water)? In France you can get both. You have to specify otherwise instead of real Budweiser you can get Yellow Water. Read more about Budweiser here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/07/business/international-business-ruling-in-france-favors-anheuser.html
https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/europe/budweiser-budvar-cesk-bud-jovice-how-to-visit-budweis-tours-tasting-breweries-how-to-get-there-a8045256.html

Posted by
4637 posts

emma, Budvar is Czech name, Budweiser German name for beer brewed in Budweis (German name) aka Ceske Budejovice (Czech name).

Posted by
37 posts

FastEddie, your Monty Python reply is spot on. For some American beers. Many great craft beers to enjoy.

Posted by
37 posts

This thread has taken on a life of its own! Perhaps, with enough posts, Mr. Steves might weigh in?

Looking for the American Budweiser, yellow water, St. Louis, etc. If I could purchase at duty free, good. If I can find in grocery stores in Paris, Bayeux, Normandy, good.

As I mentioned, my friend will not have an issue with food at all. Think he will love experiencing France. Just the Budweiser thing.

Posted by
4637 posts

Yes, you can buy Czech Budweiser in the States under the name Czechvar (It's spelled Czechvar). Translated into English would be Czechbrew.

Posted by
8650 posts

The only thing sadder would be if OP's friend was addicted to Coors.

Posted by
37 posts

There are quite a few brews that are much worse than Budweiser, and I would gladly choose Budweiser over all of those.

Posted by
1018 posts

The Israeli pita sandwich emporium Miznon, 22 Rue des Ecouffes, 75004 Paris, France, serves Budweiser beer with their food offerings.

Posted by
4673 posts

The Bud you're seeing as available in Paris may well be the real European Bud, not the beer (ish) American version he's so keen on.

No, unfortunately it will be the American one. The company that brews Budweiser, AB InBev, is so large and insidious that it is able to saturate and dominate the mass market.

Posted by
3275 posts

No, unfortunately it will be the American one. The company that brews
Budweiser, AB InBev, is so large and insidious that it is able to
saturate and dominate the mass market.

Well that's just sad.

Posted by
6649 posts

bl, just for the sake of science, when you're there, and have a can of it in your hand, check the label and see if you can tell where it was actually brewed. Report back.

Posted by
1222 posts

Oddly enough, the first time I went to London and went into a pub with tour group, all of us were drinking London Pride or other British beers. The young businessmen who came after work mostly drank Budweiser.

Posted by
153 posts

I also wonder if your friend will be able to enjoy Budweiser in Europe, as I would expect it might taste differently than the American brew he is used to. Many brands sold internationally use a different formulation to suit local tastes. Coke, for example tastes quite different to me in Mexico or Italy than it does in the States.

I used to live on a barge in Amsterdam many years ago near the Heineken Brewery and, being broke, attended the free tours and sampling rooms as often as I could. The guides there said that the beer they exported to the States was brewed differently than the wonderful elixir we drank in the Dutch pubs. The stuff destined for the States was also loaded with preservatives, as well, they said.

Posted by
154 posts

It’s made in Europe by various InBev breweries. My experience is that it’s marketed as and labeled as “Bud”. I had it in Italy and it was terrible - made by Peroni I believe. But I think the Budweiser made in the USA is terrible since the InBev takeover. Try the original Czech brand or Carlsberg.

Posted by
6488 posts

Why all the hatred of Budweiser beer (the American version)? If you don't like it, don't drink it, nobody's forcing you to. I confess that I used to drink Bud and Bud Light myself but have switched to mostly local craft brews and some imports. I hope the OP's partner finds his Budweiser in France (at least something with that name). To each their own.

Posted by
4637 posts

Mike from WV, "king of beers' - well, even here St.Louis "Budweiser" got inspiration from Budweiser from Budweis because that one is called Beer of Kings.
nukesafe, of course, Budweiser in Europe tastes differently. It's brewed in Budweis, not St.Louis and tastes like real beer, not like yellow water with bubbles.
Nancy, nobody hates American Budweiser. We just don't drink it. Maybe I would drink it if I was dying from thirst and did not have any other choice. No wonder you switched to local craft beers. Oregon (as Washington ) has good ones.

Posted by
37 posts

1995, in Ireland, I found that many Irish people loved Budweiser and found taps in nearly all of the pubs we visited.

I hope to find Budweiser that suits him in France. We shall see. Even close to the Bud here in the states should be fine for him. Really, this is the only thing I would like to be certain of prior to arriving in Paris. We will have fridges in hotels and B&Bs, and packing some for the day is not a huge issue.

Meanwhile, I will try whatever strikes me. Love trying the local offerings. There are many craft and imports that I enjoy here, and I love finding new treats in my travels.

Enjoying this thread. Never knew it would initiate such conversation. Please, if anyone does find more information that would be helpful to my cause, do not hesitate to add it here.

Thanks to all for the input.

Posted by
4673 posts

nukesafe, of course, Budweiser in Europe tastes differently. It's brewed in Budweis, not St.Louis and tastes like real beer, not like yellow water with bubbles.

You're referring to Budweiser Budvar, a completely different beer and company.

nukesafe was referring to the American Budweiser. American Budweiser that is consumed in Europe is produced by the Labatt company in Canada under licence. There are also 14 breweries in China that brew Budweiser but that is all for the Chinese domestic market.

Posted by
4673 posts

Coke, for example tastes quite different to me in Mexico or Italy than it does in the States.

Coke produced in the US uses high fructose corn syrup whereas outside of the US cane sugar is still used.

Posted by
3685 posts

Some of us beer snobs consider Bud a safety hazard since you don't know when it's in your mouth. France is less than brilliant at brewing beer (Alsace-Lorraine excepted) so I am sure he can find equally bland, no-character local brews.

Posted by
4637 posts

In most of Europe they use not cane sugar but sugar beet to sweeten Coke and for me it tastes better than corn sirup which is used here.

Posted by
72 posts

I was reliably informed by two hip assassins (one that bore an uncanny resemblance to John Travolta had spent many years in Amsterdam) that they sold beer in cinemas. And I don't mean in a paper cup, either. They give you a glass of beer, like in a bar. And in Paris, you can buy beer at McDonald's...

I heartily recommend you go to McDonald's in Paris and inquire if they have American Budweiser for sale.

Posted by
5786 posts

...that they sold beer in cinemas.

Here in Oregon our local theater not only sells beer, but wine and frozen cocktails. https://www.cinemark.com/alcohol

A great selection of draft and bottled Domestic, Import, and Local
Craft Brews.

i.e. more than just Bud.

Posted by
2272 posts

I have to admit that I find something absolutely inconsistent in someone who travels and who also drinks only American lager. I lived 13 years in St Louis, and never drank a Bud.

Posted by
5786 posts

There is a time and place for a Bud. While my choice for a "lawnmower beer" is produced by a local craft brewer, Caldera, what is even more thirst quenching is a shandy.

https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Lawn%20Mower%20Beer

Any beer low in alcohol content that is also highly quaffable. A style
of beer you would want to drink after working hard in the yard on a
hot summer day. Usually a crisp pale lager or ale with moderate to
high carbonation. Must be well chilled. Lawn mower beer style
examples include American Light Lager....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shandy

Shandy is beer mixed with a soft drink, such as carbonated lemonade,
ginger beer, ginger ale, apple juice, or orange juice. The proportions
of the two ingredients are adjusted to taste, usually half-and-half.

Posted by
4673 posts

And in Paris, you can buy beer at McDonald's...

Not just Paris but in much of Europe and rightly so. Although the only McDonalds I've ever been to outside of the UK was in Strasbourg where my youngest steadfastly refused to eat anything from the Alsatian menu at the restaurant we visited. I caved in and fought my way through an incredibly packed McDonalds just to buy him a cheeseburger. I still didn't get a beer.

Posted by
37 posts

Isn't it great that we all have our own preferences and can choose to drink/eat what we like? Sometimes, finding just what we want proves to be difficult. Other times, reaching out and asking questions can provide just the right information.

I am only searching for a possible solution that will help make this trip more enjoyable. If my friend decides to try another brew, fantastic. If not, that is fine. If I can find the Budweiser, great.

Cheers.

Posted by
5786 posts

Reading the description of shandy being beer mixed with orange juice, made me shudder! I can recommend mixing beer with coke, as drunk In Berlin.

I agree with Emma about orange juice. That would be too healthy.

BTW, Shandy in the UK and Radler in Germany where Radler is a derivative from bicycling:
https://www.eater.com/drinks/2015/6/17/8778791/radler-or-shandy-the-perfect-beer-cocktail-for-summer

When the weather turns hot and thirst runs rampant, arguments break
out at bar tops across the country over the difference between the
quaffable favorite summer beer cocktail known as the radler, or is it
the shandy? To finally put differences aside, the simple answer to
those who shout "shandy" and those who counter "radler" is that both
are correct.

And just as a good Burgundy red wine makes a better beef bourguignon than a low quality Burgundy a more flavorful larger or pilsner makes for a better Shandy/Radler than a American lager made with 30% rice. But on a hot day of walking or cycling, cold is better than warm.

Posted by
81 posts

I haven't been to France yet, will be there in May, and while I doubt I'll drink any of the hometown brew since I'm more of fan of a proper pint of bitter, I don't mind Bud if I want something light and refreshing. The wonder about the huge American beer market is you can find anything from Imperial stouts to Natty Light. Germany seemed to be more focused on a few styles that were done very well. Wish I could find Edelstoff around here. Could drink that all day.

Its funny when I talk to Americans about drinking on my trips to Europe they think everyone is drinking warm, thick, 10% ABV beers. When I tell them that no, its cold just not freezing, and most of the beers I drank were similar ABV and often typical lagers just with a bit more hop bite they are shocked.

Posted by
4684 posts

a good Burgundy red wine makes a better beef bourguignon than a low quality Burgundy

That's a horrible waste of expensive Burgundy.

A couple of years ago, Raymond Blanc, one of the UK's most respected French-influenced chefs, declared on TV that he would never cook with anything that cost more than seven euros per bottle.

Posted by
1773 posts

In Paris I am certain you can get Budweiser. I suspect it will be at an inflated price making it a questionable purchase but can be bought.

Sorry to go off topic but your question brought back memories of my college Spring Break trip to Cancun with friends.
Most all of the bars / restaurants had as get you in the door promotions 2 for $1 (yes dollar not pesos were actually the preferred currency in Cancun at the time) Dos Equis or Corona depending on the venue and who they partnered with. Bud and Bud Light were of course available for $8 to $10 each as an option.
Easily 75% of the American college student guys were drinking Bud or Bud Light and me and my friends all drinking our $.50 local beers just thought it was hysterical.

The old myth about American beers being water or European beers being better is far from accurate with the popularity of the craft beer movement here. Especially in the last couple of years the quality being produced by some of the niche breweries if you value fresh hops is far superior than anything one can purchase in Europe or anywhere else in the world.

Posted by
5786 posts

...you can get Budweiser. I suspect it will be at an inflated price making it a questionable purchase....

Story from the 70s/80s when imported beer was better than domestic (e.g. Heineken vs. Bud/Miller/Coors). The yuppie American use to buying imported beer traveled to Japan. Requesting a beer at a restaurant or bar in Tokyo, wait person asked if he wanted a domestic beer or imported. He responds "imported of course" and gets a Bud at the imported price. He could have had a Kirin or Sapporo at the domestic price.

Posted by
4637 posts

@mreynolds: true, a lot of beer from American breweries is good. Nobody probably tasted them all. I tasted many from Oregon and Washington state. I still can say: the best beer (for me) is Pilsner Urquell and it's not even from microbrewery. It's the real Pilsner because its brewed in Pilsen (Plzen) and they use hops from Saaz (Zatec) - one of the best. Right after Pilsner Urquell I would put Bernard (from Humpolec) just right amount of hops. I have never seen in in the States, yet, but if you happen to be in Czech Republic, try it. I travel a lot but the only beer which can compete with Bohemian beers (only in quality, not price) I found in Munich.

Posted by
4637 posts

@Edgar: Sapporo is much better than Bud. Heineken used to be a good beer. Now it only gives me stomachache.

Posted by
5786 posts

One shortcoming of "imported" beer is shipping "bottle shock". Kermit Lynch a 1970s wine merchant in Berkeley started talking about wine "bottle shock" where Kermit advocated shipping wine in refrigerated containers. The second problem will be how quickly the French merchant sells off their stock of Bud. Beer has a limited shelf life, more limited if not stored in a refrigerated environment.

http://www.stilltasty.com/Fooditems/index/16512

How long does unopened beer last at room temperature? Properly stored,
unopened beer will generally stay at best quality for about 4 to 6
months when stored at room temperature, although it will usually
remain safe to use after that.

Posted by
6488 posts

Ilja, I tend to agree with you. Of all the beers I tried on my trip to central Europe (from Brussels to Budapest) and there were a few - wink, wink - Pilsner Urquell was my favorite. Was happy to see it in the beer case at Whole Foods.

Posted by
4637 posts

Nancy, they also have it in Top Wines, Metropolitan Market, Trader Joe's and now and then even in Walmart.

Posted by
4673 posts

The old myth about American beers being water or European beers being better is far from accurate with the popularity of the craft beer movement here. Especially in the last couple of years the quality being produced by some of the niche breweries if you value fresh hops is far superior than anything one can purchase in Europe or anywhere else in the world.

Nonsense! There are fantastic beers being brewed throughout the US and Europe, neither is more superior than the other. I've had some superb craft beers in the US just as I've had in Europe and even brewing my own. As long as you overlook the big, homogenous brands then you can be sure of finding many decent beers wherever you are. I wonder when the last time you drank a decent beer in Europe was in order to reach the conclusion you have.

Posted by
1773 posts

JC: Plenty of fantastic beers from Europe. I never said otherwise.
I am not referring to Sam Adams, Sierra Nevada and other large producers in the US. I am talking about the new breed of high end niche breweries that are unique to the US.

Local to me, the breweries
Trillium and Tree House in Massachusetts are 2 examples of what I was trying to communicate. Throughout the US there are many others but you have to a real beer enthusiast to know of any of them.

Trillium and Tree House in my local area brew beers that are just a step above anything you can buy at your liquor store or will find in your local brew pub making their own beer and selling food (neither sell to bars, restaurants or liquor stores) and both have a cult following and huge lines as well as outrageous prices. Their business model seems absolutely insane but somehow works and gives them big margins.

The Alchemist in Vermont is another example ; a little different from the other 2 as they don't sell at the brewery, you can only buy from select stores and they make their beer in cans and deliver it on an exact day of the week. Those stores each week have lines out the door waiting for the delivery of Heady Topper. They purposely only make in small batches so it is sold that day or the next day. Supply never meets demand.

They use super expensive hops from around the world and no expense is spared in the process. You are buying beer that is only days old.
There are plenty of websites where beers from around the world are rated and these new niche US small breweries dominate the top ratings.

In Europe:
The Trappist Monks in Belgium would I guess be the closest comparison but although excellent quality not sure how you can get that very fresh easily.

Posted by
4637 posts

True, Belgium has hundreds of different beers even raspberry beer. However when I drink beer I want it to taste like a beer. I found beer like that in Bavaria and Bohemia. I know, it's very subjective. I remember once we had a discussion with my friends in south Moravia wine cellar which sample of wine is better, so we turned to the old winemaker and owner of the cellar. He said: "Don't argue, guys, the better one is which you like better."

Posted by
384 posts

When I was in London a couple of years ago, I had dinner at a BBQ place in Fulham. They wanted me to try this AMAZING American beer called 'Budweiser' -- at 7 pounds per bottle.

I passed and enjoyed a nice glass of Fuller's ESB instead.

Posted by
4673 posts

JC: Plenty of fantastic beers from Europe. I never said otherwise.
I am not referring to Sam Adams, Sierra Nevada and other large producers in the US. I am talking about the new breed of high end niche breweries that are unique to the US.

You stated that the beers from some of the niche breweries in the US are far superior to anything found in Europe, that is what I referred to as nonsense.

I'm also not talking about Sam Adams, Sierra Nevada et al although they are better than the monoliths of Coors, Budweiser etc. I've sampled many of the local "niche" brewery offerings during my travels to the US but you cannot categorically say that they're superior to anything available in Europe. How many "niche" breweries in the UK have you sampled beer from? This isn't a contest to establish which country produces better beer, that's just petty. There's crap beer in the US, there's crap beer in the UK, there's crap beer in France, there's crap beer everywhere but equally there's some very good beer being made all over the world, and no one place is superior to any other.

Posted by
5786 posts

Just to reiterate and clarify the trade name "Budweiser", "Budweiser" in france would legally be brewed by the Czech company Budweiser Budva. If you want the American pale lager marketed by Anheuser-Busch Inbev, you need to order a "Bud".

Posted by
8650 posts

Any chance you can get your friend to try Miller beer.... its "the champagne of beers".... or so say their ads... be appropriate for France.

Posted by
1844 posts

I apologize in advance but I'm just a good old boy from the hills of West Virginia. I like the museums and history, but am not much of a foodie. I'll appreciate the Louvre and then grab a beer and a burger. I will also speak French pleasantries like pardon and merci.

Posted by
12898 posts

In Paris you'll get French and Belgian beers....mainly, eg, Kanterbräu, Stella Artois, Pelforth, Leffe, etc. Budweiser (the American version) is simply awful, never touch the stuff.

Posted by
37 posts

My friend is a loyal Bud man. Regular Bud, not light.

Like I said, it will be me trying the local offerings. While he might try, my money is on him sticking with his favorite. To each his own.

Posted by
5786 posts

...a loyal Bud man.

Do a web search for: "schlitz super bowl taste test 1981"

Schiltz did a live 1981 super bowl ad featuring

"100 loyal Michelob drinkers" a blind taste test putting their brand
up against Schlitz.

After the 100 panelists tasted each beer in unmarked cups, Mr. Bell
blew his whistle so they could make their picks. The results?

A 50-50 split.

http://wwnorton.tumblr.com/post/40864025234/the-naked-statistics-of-the-1981-schlitz-super-bowl-blin

The genius of the campaign was conducting the taste test exclusively
among beer drinkers who stated that they preferred a competing beer.
If the blind taste test is really just a coin flip, then roughly half
of the Budweiser or Miller or Michelob drinkers will end up picking
Schlitz. That makes Schlitz look really good. Half of all Bud drinkers
like Schlitz better!

Schlitz needed only a mediocre beer and a solid grasp of statistics to
know that this ploy–a term I do not use lightly, event when it comes
to beer advertising–would almost certainly work out in its favor.
Most beers in the Schlitz category taste about the same; ironically, that is exactly the fact that this advertising campaign exploited.
Assume that the typical beer drinker off the street cannot tell
Schlitz from Budweiser from Michelob from Miller.
In that case, a
blind taste test between any two of the beers is essentially a coin
flip. On average, half the taste testers will pick Schlitz, and half
will pick the beer it is “challenging.”

Posted by
1773 posts

I think we can mostly all agree there is beer in both great, good and bad forms in both Europe and the US.
I happen to prefer a very hoppy beer and that style is just rarely brewed outside of the US so have my preferences as does the OP's friend for their type of beer, that is all.
My main point was that long ago it was common to say American beers were all watered down and mass produced. Some of it is of course.

Posted by
4673 posts

I happen to prefer a very hoppy beer and that style is just rarely brewed outside of the US

When was the last time you drank beer in the UK? If it's a while ago you may be pleasantly surprised as hundreds of new breweries open up every year with big, hoppy, American style beers being the favourite style. Even supermarket shelves are heaving under the weight of these new 'IPA' styles, we can't get enough of it it would appear.

Posted by
1773 posts

Good to know. My UK drinking experience is not recent other than a Guinness in Dublin last year.
Certain parts of Europe are definitely more beer minded than others (UK, Germany, Belgium, even Norway had surprisingly a decent beer culture though with outrageous prices) ; other countries are still very Wine centric and finding a good beer in a nice restaurant can be quite challenging in those parts even though the wine cellar is filled with choices.

Posted by
6649 posts

JC, I thought that "bitters" were in the same family of hoppy beers. Not true?

Posted by
5786 posts

English "Bitter" covers a wide range of pale ales where ales are top fermented beers. The English made India Pale Ale famous in its ability to withstand shipment where the hops preserve the brew.

Posted by
4673 posts

other countries are still very Wine centric and finding a good beer in a nice restaurant can be quite challenging in those parts even though the wine cellar is filled with choices.

I agree although during my recent trip to Spain I found a craft beer on the menu in a restaurant in Benahavis that is brewed in Malaga. It was a very nice, citrus hopped pale ale and made a very welcome change to the bland Spanish beer that is often the only choice. A quick look on the internet shows there's a sea of change occurring in Spain with regards to craft beer so here's hoping that we'll soon start seeing a lot more of it being served.

Posted by
337 posts

I have to second what JC said. There are a lot of good craft and micro brews in Spain. I live in the middle of the Rioja Wine region, but as I am the only on in my house who drinks, I don´t like buying a bottle of wine, and then leaving it open for a few days. Luckily there are is a craftbrew store around the corner from my house. They have all kinds of brew, ipas, lagers, stouts, ciders, etc. Most are Spanish but a few from other countries. There is a brewery in Hernani, by San Sebastian, the Basqueland Brewing Project. It is run by three American guys, and they have quite a large selection and it is very good.

Posted by
37 posts

Yes, I agree! Never knew this thread would take the path it has taken. Very interesting, great information!

This post may have broken the record for most comments also. At least for the first 30 pages of topics!

Posted by
27761 posts

Ask this lot about beer and this is what you get.... passion!!!

Posted by
5 posts

Even the French seem to be , eventually, tuning in to the attraction of craft beer - at least the young French are- and the number of breweries in France has increased dramatically over the last few years.

In Nice, that I visit regularly, they are even brewing a local craft beer made from chickpea flour - socca beer ( socca being a local food speciality).

In my home country, Scotland, we now have excellent craft beer and a brewer from my local city, Aberdeen - Brewdog- has recently opened a brewery in Columbus, Ohio.

About time the beauties of beer were better know across the world!

Posted by
4673 posts

In my home country, Scotland, we now have excellent craft beer and a brewer from my local city, Aberdeen - Brewdog- has recently opened a brewery in Columbus, Ohio.

I love Brewdog's Elvis Juice, a powerfully hopped IPA infused with grapefruit. Tastes a lot better than it sounds.

Posted by
4673 posts

Americans are drinking less Bud. The rest of the world loves it

A bit hyperbolic perhaps!

Posted by
37 posts

Everyone steps out of their comfort zones in their own way. For my friend, this trip would be a step out. I will not argue over the Budweiser in contrast to the all of the historic sites, the food and the memories this trip will bring. I believe even Rick Steves would not argue that point.

To each his own. Happy traveling!

Posted by
281 posts

@ bl.dower15 - absolutely. Your May 15 post nailed it. As for the few on this thread who have taken to beer shaming and making a host of assumptions based on a beverage choice, feel free to practice the open minded approach to others you seem to preach. Geez.

Posted by
1773 posts

OP: Many of us were just having fun ; you seemed to be taking it well so was not I hope at your expense.
Certain brands like Budweiser can bring out strong opinions.

My personal example would be McDonalds. When we travel overseas with our young daughter I am always fearful she will not try any different foods, so have been guilty on multiple occasions of seeking out the nearest McDonalds to get her Chicken Nuggets.
I would fully expect the forum to make fun of me for that and am totally fine with that.

Starbucks in European cities is another example.

Hopefully the post between the side tracking did answer the original question in the affirmative and I wish you happy travels as well!

Posted by
308 posts

I have a confession to make. I had the most delicious iced tea in the Starbucks outside the Louvre last year!! I will also admit to going into McDonald's a few times in Europe to buy a small soda so I could use the restroom.

Posted by
84 posts

What about Stella Artois? It is known as the "Budweiser of Belgium"

Posted by
5786 posts

The Flemish Stella Artois is a nice pilsner, interesting owned by Anheuser-Busch InBev who also owns the American Bud.

Posted by
27761 posts

I went into Starbuck$ yesterday.

They gave me a free refill of my water bottlle

Posted by
37 posts

@Steve and @mreynolds, thank you. This will be a most special trip, now in memory of my brother. We had planned this trip, to meet in Normandy in 2019, four years ago. He died a little over a month later.

Live and let live. Try, if you choose. Be happy. Life goes by at a pretty fast pace.

Cheers!

Posted by
4684 posts

In Britain Stella Artois is real lowest-common denominator stuff, popularly known as "wife-beater".

Posted by
1844 posts

lol I have (American) friends who think Stella Artois is the bees knees. Since it's not an American beer maybe they see it as exotic or some cool hipster thing.

At the moment I love Belgium's Fat Tire beer. I can't recall the last time I drank a good ole Budweiser. I'll have to give it a try.

Posted by
6488 posts

At the moment I love Belgium's Fat Tire beer. I can't recall the last time I drank a good ole Budweiser. I'll have to give it a try.

You make it sound like Fat Tire beer comes from Belgium. Might want to clarify that it's an American made beer by New Belgium Brewery (Ft Collins, CO). That being said, I agree, it's one of my favorite American brews. I'll also say that, depending on what is available where I am, I have been know to tip a Bud or two (or three).

Posted by
4673 posts

Stella Artois is not a bad beer, it's good thirst quencher and goes well as a first pinter after a day traipsing around in the sun. It's got a decent amount of taste and mouth feel but rapidly becomes a bit boring. It's a shame it's now synonymous with violent thugs.

Posted by
5786 posts

Aparently Stella Artois' "wife beater" rep in the UK is associated with hooligans buying alcoholic content. Stella Artois's 5%+ is considered high in the UK and certainly much higher than American "near beers" (3.2%).

It would be interesting to hear an English perspective on why English beers are typcallyy weak (<5%) in alcohol. The typical craft beers served in Oregon are higher to much higher than 5% alcohol content. Oregon pub/resturants serving craft beers typically list % ABV (Alcolol by volumne) and IBUs (International Bitterness Units). For example: https://www.commonblockbrewing.com/beer/

Posted by
1844 posts

Nancy, sorry! Well, I knew I saw "Belgium" somewhere lol. That's embarrassing.

Made in America? Very patriotic, but now I don't feel as hip drinking it.

Medford... Steve Prefontaine's home town? He was a childhood hero of mine.

Posted by
4673 posts

Edgar, British beers haven't traditionally been relatively weak in ABV. It all started around 1900 with the Temperance Movement which campaigned for lower strength beers, shorter pub opening hours, higher tax etc, all of which gained traction at the outbreak of WW1.

However with the popularity of lager in the 70's and 80's more and more people were drinking beer around the 5% mark (although there have always been strong British beers but powerful marketing and new tastes secured the popularity of the big names). There has been however a strong and steady emergence of stronger beers, 'craft' beers, a keen interest in foreign beers and new breweries are constantly opening in the UK with many beers in the 6%, 7% and above range. Conversely many of the big players have reduced the ABV in their big sellers, they tell us that it's for our own good but really it's to reduce their tax liability. The higher tax bands play a big part in the commercial viability of higher strength beers, one of the pubs I was in on Saturday was selling a 330ml bottle of milk stout with an ABV of 11% for £12. I saw them sell at least one bottle!

British beer has an unfair reputation of being warm, weak, tasteless water. The reality couldn't be more different.

Posted by
5786 posts

MikeFromWV: Medford... Steve Prefontaine's home town? He was a childhood hero of mine.
Pre was from Coos Bay, not Medford, OR. You may be thinking of Dick Fosbury (as in Fosbury Flop) who developed the high jumping technique while a student at Medford High.

JC: British beer has an unfair reputation of being warm, weak, tasteless water. The reality couldn't be more different.
I share your disagreement. I would add that English beer taste better after a day of walking and in companionship of other walkers. Our village to village walking trips were more like pub to pub walking trips and if lucky, a pub stop for lunch.

Posted by
4673 posts

Edgar, I would say that any beer would go down well after a day of walking.....even a Bud!

Posted by
45 posts

This is a great thread - I've gotten two days of entertainment, so thank you all who have contributed. If put to the task, my own reply would be the same as I have for wine: My favorite beer/wine? The liquid kind.