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Wash cloths

Do the hotels in London provide wash cloths for the shower?

Posted by
6272 posts

Not the ones I’ve stayed in so play it safe and bring one or two that you can toss when you leave.

Nor will you find any electric plugs in the bathroom for a hairdryer. Safety issue.

Posted by
6449 posts

Not normally. If you're a wash cloth user, bring your own.

Posted by
10004 posts

Much to my surprise, they were provided at The Rockwell when we stayed there recently.

We travel with a nylon “scrubby” for the shower and I use Olay Daily Facials, single use dry cloths that contain a mild facial cleanser.

Posted by
3265 posts

We tend to bring washcloths to Europe. We like the quick dry microfiber fabric. Dries overnight. Lightweight as well!

Wash cloths (or “flannels” as us Brits of a certain age call them) are regarded as a personal item like toothbrushes and are not routinely supplied in UK hotels.

Why not use your hands?

Posted by
1225 posts

I always throw a couple of Magellans 'InstaCloth' wash cloths in my suitcase. They are 1" tablets that become a wash cloth when you get it wet. They can be used more than once and then thrown away.

Posted by
4 posts

Thanks to all for your helpful replies. When traveling in Europe previously we bought cheapie wash cloths and then just tossed them. We will do the same for London.

Posted by
21671 posts

Haven't used a wash cloth since my Army days -- over 50 years ago.

Posted by
20872 posts

If you buy super-cheap washcloths for this purpose, test them to be sure the dyes are fast. I bought a bundle of 10 at Walmart several years ago--nice deep colors so they wouldn't get mixed up with hotel linens. The colors run all over the place, so they aren't usable.

Posted by
4598 posts

American chain hotels and some other chain hotels (the Accor group for example) will provide washcloths. Most independent hotels will not.

Unless you've been working down a coalmine I find a scrub of shower gel with my hands to be suffiucuent.

Posted by
6449 posts

Unless you've been working down a coalmine I find a scrub of shower gel with my hands to be suffiucuent.

Like most other things in travel, to each their own. I prefer to use a washcloth but neither of my daughters do, but at least one of them uses those puffy little scrubbie things. It's a matter of personal preference.

Posted by
20872 posts

I've stayed in several Ibis hotels, which are Accor, aren't they? I've never seen a washcloth in any of them. But I think I've only stayed in plain Ibises and Ibis Budgets.

It is difficult to rinse soap off ones face without splashing water all over the floor if one doesn't have a washcloth. I shower in the morning and wash my face at night.

Posted by
14796 posts

My experience is that if you ask for them (and yes, sometimes they are still called flannels), you will get them. Worst case, go to Marks & Spencer (or similar) and buy a couple. Their website calls them face cloths.

Posted by
588 posts

I don't like to throw a spanner in the works with some of these suggestions - well, I do, but that's just my personality - but there is certainly now a movement in the U.K. against cheap disposable textiles. It's usually seen in the context of stuff you wear, but could equally apply to face cloths. Use once and throw away is seen as a waste of resources, particularly when the environmental cost of growing the raw material is considered.

Posted by
2111 posts

Use your socks.

It means your socks get washed when you do.

Result = clean socks and clean you.

Posted by
3926 posts

Re - buying cheap ones and throwing them out after only a use or two - I keep my ones that are near the end of their life cycle in a 'travel drawer' and take them with me. Yes, I'm still discarding them, but they've been used dozens and dozens of times.

I like having them to clean the water off my face in the shower (or get the shampoo out of my eyes) or if it's been a hot, sweaty day - to just give myself a quick freshen up before bed. Personally...for soaping up...I buy the 3/$1 bath poofs at the dollar store. You can dry them fairly quickly with the hair dryer.

Posted by
4598 posts

I've stayed in several Ibis hotels, which are Accor, aren't they? I've never seen a washcloth in any of them. But I think I've only stayed in plain Ibises and Ibis Budgets.

Yes, Ibis are part of Accor but they're the budget level so you won't find facecloths in the bathroom. You will in a Sofitel and even a scrub pad!

Posted by
2654 posts

If I were you and worried about having a wash cloth just pack a couple, they don’t take up that much room in luggage.

Posted by
519 posts

I have several microfiber washcloths and I usually travel with just one. They are easy enough to wash out and dry overnight.

Posted by
8442 posts

Buy a (preferably) organic cotton...

?

I have not heard of 'inorganic' cotton, which is implied by this statement.

What is 'inorganic' cotton and how does one discern the difference?

I just bring an old washcloth from home, keep it i a resealable plastic bag between uses and if it does get lost, its not a great loss

Posted by
676 posts

Joe, i dont understand your question, there are organic ( no chemicals) or non organic (chemicals) versions of all crops and cotton is obviously a crop. What do you mean?

Posted by
8442 posts

, there are organic ( no chemicals) or non organic (chemicals

Thank you, now I see the distinction being made

Posted by
638 posts

I bring my own wash cloth to the UK. Not disposable. All my bath linen at home is white. I bought a 4 pack of good quality wash cloths at TJ Maxx (I think it was), in a dark grey color so I'd have one for travel that's distinguishable from hotel towels. I washed them before using in hot water and bleach, so any dye-bleeding is over and done. I use them at home all the time and bring one when I travel outside the US.

I agree that microfiber would be a better choice than cotton. But on my last trip, I wrung out the cloth and laid it on the radiator in my room so it dried very fast. (I love the heated towel racks and radiators in hotels because they help your handwashing dry so nicely.) These particular gray wash cloths have been going strong in normal use for more than a year now and show no signs of wearing out yet.