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Travel as a Political Act & How Americans are Perceived

I just received Rick's package of:
"Travel as a Political Act" book,
"The Story of Fascism in Europe" DVD,
Rick's lecture based on his experiences, "Travel as a Political Act,"
"Travel Skills" 2 DVD set,
and
"Europe, Best Destinations" booklet.

These were premiums for my donation to my local PBS station, and a great addition to my travel library. I highly recommend them, because when we travel, not only are we learning about their cultures, they're developing (or changing) their opinion of Americans.

I wanted to mention several interactions I had in England when I traveled there not long ago. Whenever I stood in queue for an event or waiting for the opening of an attraction, I'd talk to the people waiting there with me. I deliberately kept my American accent, as I was curious as to what their view of Americans was. (I could very well have drifted into the Enlgish accent, having lived there over several summers in the late 1960's) I was asked, more than once on my trip, "What part of Canada are you from?" to which I replied, "Los Angeles."

They gave me a puzzled look, as if to say, "How can you be an American? You're not at all what I expected to experience from an American!"

What they see on television, from our politics, mass shootings, political hysteria, and exported, sensationalized television shows (Jerry Springer, CSI -everywehre, fill in the blank), and of general ignorance of Europe, is actually how some of them have formed an opinion of us!

I talked with them, explained a little about where I grew up, what I studied in college, how I came back after 40+ years to see how things have changed (far more international, having heard Chinese, Nigerian, Russian, Indian, and other accents as I walked through the South Bank), and wanting to see as much as I could in the 3 weeks I was there, the interesting sights I had seen and hoped to see, and the people. I think they had quite a different take on America after meeting me!

When we travel, we're ambassadors of our country to every person we meet. Just as we learn about the culture of other countries, we're affecting how they perceive Americans. I would hope that we leave a more positive message than what our news programs project.

I asked a docent at Warwick Castle of her oddest experience with an American. She related the following: There was an American woman, middle aged, who was wandering around, taking in at all the arms and armor, the various rooms of the castle, and then told her, "Imagine! They made this castle just for tourists!" (Groan! The woman thought this was just like Disneyland!) We both had a laugh about that one! She patiently told the woman that this was an actual castle, begun in 1070 a.d. and added to over the centuries.

If this were your only experience with an American, what would you think????????

Posted by
519 posts

“When we travel, we're ambassadors of our country to every person we meet. Just as we learn about the culture of other countries, we're affecting how they perceive Americans”.-

So true, CarlC- I always want to be a good ambassador and display the best of America wherever I go! 😊

Posted by
6567 posts

When traveling, I am an ambassador that refuses to talk about anything political.
And I universally observe that journalists are not getting the true message to the people--in North America or overseas.
We do find that they love to hear our deep southern accents.
And all they love to talk about music when they find out I'm from Nashville.

Posted by
9793 posts

It's strange....I spend 3-4 months a year in the UK and have never had that kind of experience. People ask about our government and to explain what is going on in the U.S. When there has been a few mass shootings they will ask why these happen. They know our TV shows are just that......TV shows. Take a good look at some of the British dramas and they aren't much different from ours. If you think Jerry Springer is bad, you've never seen Jeremy Kyle (He was recently taken off the air because one of his guests committed suicide.)

I have not found Americans nor the British to be or be seen as stereotypical as you experienced. Every nationality has tourists that are not aware of cultures they're visiting. It seems you were looking for the negative stereotypes. At Warwick Castle you asked what the stupidest thing an AMERICAN stated not what the stupidest thing a tourist stated. Next time, ask them what they think about Chinese tourists.

Were these tourists you spoke to online British or from other parts of the world? I have yet to meet any person from the UK, except perhaps in truly rural areas, who has not had contact with Americans in the past. The British are a lot smarter and wiser than you make them out to be.

Rick doesn't help because he seems to put down most American tourists except of course those who buy his books or take his tours.

Posted by
1290 posts

I agree with you, Frank. I’ve experienced none of this in the past 15 trips to the UK, and elsewhere in Europe for that matter.

Posted by
6841 posts

You are not from the UK. It would be pretentious to talk with a British accent.
There is also a general ignorance of the USA depending on where you go in Europe that you will not find standing in line at a tourist site. When we travel we are not ambassadors for the USA and negative people come from everywhere in the world. It does not sound like you are aware of the real world if so you would know that in America there are Americans ignorant about other people and cultures living in their own homeland.

Posted by
1009 posts

I find the ugly American stereotype has long since vanished in Europe. Most Europeans may hate Presidents but like our people. Europeans that I talk to always admire our politeness and we don't have the stag/hen parties.

Speaking English means that most people will assume you are American. Even when speaking in their language most can pick up the accent. My motto is be polite and respectful of all countries--that what makes a good traveler. Traveling through Europe and America, I've seen rude tourists from every country, Frenchmen, German, Chinese. Rude people are rude people.

Posted by
1069 posts

Welcome to the forum, CarlC! You will find a lot of people here who are very frequent travelers to Europe, with as many opinions as there are participants - but I think most try to be thoughtful and considerate of the cultures they are visiting.

I occasionally have people ask me about the politics of the U.S., although I try to avoid that. However asking questions in return, turning it into a real conversation, creates a learning occasion for me - as opposed to a “lecture” for them. I think those who ask are interested in learning about daily life, just like I am. We have discussed driving styles, retirement age and attitudes, housing dilemmas, and much more. Yes, there was the coach driver who recalled the man off the cruise ship immediately asking “When are you all going to quit driving on the wrong side of the road?”, but he was well aware that was not the response of every American (and perhaps even meant as humor).

Posted by
4747 posts

Americans aren’t perceived here any differently to Canadians (or any other nationality) and if most Brits heard a transatlantic accent, they would assume you were American, not Canadian, as most can’t tell the difference and more visitors here are American. It’s the same with Australians and Kiwis - the accents sound similar to the uninitiated.

I think your current president has an impact on what some people here in the UK think (unfortunately not in a good way) about your political system, but we can’t point the finger at anyone at present due to the Brexit mess we find ourselves in!

Posted by
785 posts

Travel is travel. I don't think travel should be a political act or make a statement. I enjoy speaking to citizens of other countries to hear about their culture, traditions and their problems. I speak English, have no desire to speak their language other than a few nice phrases to say please, thank you and good day, etc. I am an American and expect to be treated as a customer of theirs, no better or worse than their own citizens. I don't try to be a local because I'm not. I am polite, friendly and have never run into any issue being an American. In fact, most of the time when engaged, I find Europeans more curious about the US than I could have ever imagined. Nobody likes loud, rude people no matter their citizenship. When traveling just remember to act like a guest and you will be treated accordingly.

Posted by
4368 posts

Sorry Carl but I find your post slightly patronising.

Most Brits are fully aware that movies and TV dramas are not quite refective of the reality just as most Americans don't believe that we're all walking around England as if we'd just stepped off the set of Downton Abbey. Most people upon hearing an American accent are going to assume US American rather than Canadian. Other than the more obvious accents the average US American accent sounds the same as a Canadian one to most Brits.

I never travel with the thought that I'm an ambassador for my country, I just travel with the intention of being polite, respectful and mindful of other customs. I'm fully aware that there are hordes of my fellow countrymen who don't share my attitudes but I càn't alter that.

There are stereotypes travelling everywhere. Currently at the resort I'm staying at in Phuket there are a handful of men who are, by a very long stretch, the loudest people in the resort and they're all American. They are seemingly incapable of talking at a normal volume however as Americans make up the second largest number of guests here (after Chinese) there are plenty more Americans who are able to communicate at a volume in line with everyone else.

Negative stereotypes exist everywhere, I just aim not to be one of them.

Posted by
2 posts

To David of Huntsville: I avoid talking about religion, politics, sex, and money, even to others in the US. These are the topics about which people are the most insecure, and the most likely to misinterpret or react negatively to. With regard to politics in a visiting country, I recuse myself as not a participant if I'm asked, and I don't bring it up. I tell them "We have our problems, too."

To Frank II from Fredonia: Yes, I've seen some of the shows in England. No, I don't focus solely on the negatives or on stereotypes. You likely didn't visit the venues I did, or talk to the people I did. You are correct about this, that it pays to read up on the places you go before you go, as this undoubtedly adds richness to the experience. Regarding Warwick Castle, I asked for the "oddest" or "most unusual" experience with a tourist, NOT the "stupidest." I had a quite unique experience with a Chinese visitor to Shakespeare's Birthplace. We both stepped in with a tour group of school children (it was crowded with tour groups), and then slipped upstairs. We were both photographers, and pointed things out to each other. Both of us compared photos when we left. The docents spoke fluent Chinese, as well, and it was one of the most delightful days I spent in England. I met holiday visitors coming to London for Easter in line for the Victoria and Albert Museum. It was the first day of a David Bowie exhibit. One was from Nottingham, another was from Somerset (who was waiting for her daughter from London to join her). I had a good many conversations. None were online. I take Rick's advice with a grain of salt. My family has traveled since the 1960's, having had travel agents and airline workers in the family.

To: Diane from California who agrees with Frank:

Everyone has different experiences. My demographic may be different than yours.

To: Jazz+Travels:
When you live in a place you tend to pick up on the culture and the language. When I came back from England back in the 1960's, people thought I was a foreigner. Some people have that knack. Never assume people are ignorant or naive. I've seen more of the US than I have of any other country.

To Heather from Chicago:
For some reason several people there assumed I was Canadian. Why, I don't know. You're right that politeness goes a long way in getting along with others, regardless of the country. I've heard from others that they've encountered rude people in France. I never have. I've been there multiple times.

To the others that have commented on my post:
Thanks for the input. It's informative and presents a broader view of travel. While I don't travel "as a political act" like Rick Steves, I travel as an interested party in the larger world. I have friends throughout Europe as a result.

Posted by
759 posts

CarlC- great posts, thank you. Never let them get you down. Sadly many in this world only see things in one dimension and can’t see nor deal with those who have a greater depth of knowledge and insight into the world and its peoples. We are all so much not the same and as a result have different and varied experiences.

Travel safe,

One Fast Bob

Posted by
4871 posts

I have lived overseas for 9 years (Saudi Arabia and Germany) and traveled to 78 foreign countries.

I first traveled overseas in the early 80s when foreign travel was relatively expensive compared to today. The Americans that I met during European travel were either wealthy or serving with the US military (at that time we had about 350,000 service members in Europe opposing the Soviets). The worst thing that I remember was my ex-wife's aunt who was traveling with us complaining about not getting butter with bread for lunch or dinner. I explained that butter with bread was for breakfast in Europe.

Today many more people are traveling overseas. More Americans that might not be as familiar with geography or foreign languages.

I have found that traveling in the UK, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand that there is a kinship Americans have with those countries. Our culture is from the British and we are more alike than different.

The most frustrating foreign tourists are the Chinese, who break in line, block photographic items to others contrary to our ways. Still, I understand, having been to China and seen how crowded it is there.

Posted by
1128 posts

I’m American and I have no hesitation about talking about politics or religion in Europe. I don’t consider myself an ambassador though. I’m just one person who has a very extensive knowledge of European politics.

But it’s not like the first thing I say is ‘How do you feel about Brexit’ or ‘what church do you go to?’ If the conversation leads itself there, then fine.

Posted by
1009 posts

The most frustrating foreign tourists are the Chinese, who break in
line, block photographic items to others contrary to our ways. Still,
I understand, having been to China and seen how crowded it is there.

Actually I find the younger Asian tourists seem to be better mannered perhaps because they've grown up with the internet and understand other cultures more-just as many US citizens. My rudest fellow tourist was an old Chinese woman traveling with another woman as part of a tour. They were in back of me in the line to the Orsay museum in Paris and evidently decided they wanted to get ahead of the line. The woman actually came up next to me and elbowed me so hard that I fell against a fellow tourist. Luckily the line didn't break and they both were still behind me. About 3 minutes later she tried the same thing but as I saw her coming, I shoved her first into her friend-looked her straight in the eye and said no. She and her friend slunk back in the line. As an American, I hated to be that rude but I won't be shoved twice.

Posted by
31289 posts

My what an interesting discussion!

"When we travel, we're ambassadors of our country to every person we meet. Just as we learn about the culture of other countries, we're affecting how they perceive Americans."

I don't travel with the idea of being an "ambassador of my country", but just try to be a polite and respectful visitor, and learn something of the culture and history of the country I'm visiting. Unless they ask, I don't bother mentioning which country I'm from, so there's no way they would know how to perceive me based on cultural stereotypes. I also don't follow the somewhat dated practice of sewing a Canadian flag on my backpack.

Posted by
7585 posts

With 330- million Americans in a world of several billion people, I have trouble with the concept of all those billions perceiving this 330-million in the same way.

Some of what's described in this post was true before the travel boom when people in rural areas had never met an American or Canadian or Russian or Chinese.
I remember in 1971 a Bulgarian cleaner on the train meeting her first American, me, and begging for my address, or how excited we were when the first Poles, Czechs, etc could come to Paris after the Wall came down. However, those days are long gone in Western Europe.

This post baffles me.

Posted by
1862 posts

most Brits heard a transatlantic accent, they would assume you were
American, not Canadian, as most can’t tell the difference and more
visitors here are American.

This has been my experience. Not once have I been asked if I'm Canadian, it's automatically assumed I'm American. Speaking of stereotypes though; last year in London we were asked at a pub by the waiter if we were American, I said "no, we're Canadian," and he smiled and said he should have known because we didn't ask for ketchup. 😁

A few times in France last Spring I was asked the American question and when I replied I was Canadian I was told that was the same thing. I was on an RS tour and our guide explained to me that some people just lump North Americans together and call us all Americans just as we may generalize and call someone from Europe a European.

Posted by
1862 posts

I also don't follow the somewhat dated practice of sewing a Canadian
flag on my backpack.

Maybe this should be a post on its own, but I'm curious if Canadians and Americans still do that? I will admit I did pack a couple of ball caps with me on my last trip, one did have a Maple Leaf as the logo, the other is a Blue Jay's cap which also has a Maple Leaf in the logo. I've never done it though to make sure people know I'm not American.

Posted by
90 posts

Other than certain vowels, it's quite hard to distinguish between Canadian and American voices. Evening phone calls to my car insurer are answered in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

I'm sure most Britons are aware of differences between Canada and the USA, there are historic links between Britain and Canada, often still through family, many British people emigrated to Canada especially during the 1950s and earlier, I noticed surnames of Scottish descent were quite usual, at least in Ontario and BC

Canada is a commonwealth country, in London they have a High Commission not an embassy, they have a parliamentary system, HM the Queen is head of state,
the Royal Canadian Airforce is sometimes seen on parade at Barracks in London,

I recently spoke to someone working at a London hotel, they told me as a Canadian they'd been eligible for a 2 year youth mobility visa, you need to be 18-30.

Posted by
7585 posts

They're probably still upset about losing the Battle of the Plains of Abraham!
Very funny. I did see huge Saint Jean bonfires on the Plains, a Celtic tradition.
More confusing though may be why the English have named a few battles after London tube stations.

Posted by
1862 posts

there are historic links between Britain and Canada, often still
through family, many British people emigrated to Canada especially
during the 1950s and earlier, I noticed surnames of Scottish descent
were quite usual, at least in Ontario and BC

Probably a comment of little interest to anyone but myself, but here goes....

My European adventures began in October 2014 and my wife and I have made 4 trips in that time with a trip to Scotland at for June. It's these trips that have given me a keener interest and a better appreciation of Canadian history. The immigration to populate Western Canada began in force in the late 1800's and you just have to look at the names of places to get an appreciation of the British influence. The Province of Alberta was named after one of Queen Victoria's daughters. The influence of Scotland within Alberta is astounding; Calgary, Banff, Airdrie, Canmore, Fort MacLeod, Fort McMurray, Innisfail, Stirling, Strathmore.....the list goes on.

Posted by
3895 posts

Interestingly, my husband and I have been mistaken for Scottish and Irish when we've been overseas at least 3-4 times. Once - a couple from Ontario thought my husband was Scottish! (Bit chagrined when he said no - Nova Scotia...lol).

My sister moved to the UK in 07 and was always being confused for Scot/Irish.

But I'm laughing thinking about the American guy at Menin Gate in Belgium back in 17 - he was making sure people knew he didn't vote for Trump ;)

Posted by
4368 posts

A few times I've encountered French people in France outside of Paris in the fall, and they've asked me if I am English. I say no, American. I then see delight and surprise on their faces--they actually smile and want to chat.

That's because they see big tips coming.

Posted by
7585 posts

Laughed so hard at JC’s comment.

On this side of the puddle, Nick, “running down” doesn’t mean jokes.

Posted by
12384 posts

Frankie, I go over 2 or 3 times a year, own business there and have accumulated many, many, many hundreds of days in europe and you are ....
.......
.......
.......
absolutely correct.

Of course if one carries a certain bias, they will experience life through that colored glass.

Posted by
31289 posts

Allan,

"Maybe this should be a post on its own, but I'm curious if Canadians and Americans still do that?"

Yes they do, although not as frequently as in the past. I've seen many examples of that on each trip to Europe. Also, if you watch the Amazing Race Canada some of the teams have a large Canadian flag sewn on their backpacks. Displaying the flag seems to be an outdated relic of the past. These days I don't think most Europeans care where tourists are from.

The new season of Amazing Race Canada will probably be starting in about July, so you can have a look then. They've been recruiting teams over the last month or two, and I think they've now selected a group for this season.

Posted by
12384 posts

I prefer Canadians keep displaying their tree leaf so no one mistakes them for us.

Posted by
3895 posts

The luggage tag on hubs suitcase is a Canada flag - lol. He did wear a small Canadian pin the first few times over but don't think he's bothered since. The t-shirts I take over generally flag me as Canadian - if you know that New Scotland is Nova Scotia (my New Scotland Clothing Company tees) or that the maple leaf/shape of my province on my HOME shirts (made locally!) announce that I'm Canadian - it does to fellow Scotians - when we were in Venice in Sept, I had some fellow Scotians know I was from here because of my HOME shirt - had a nice chat for a few minutes with them. (And I'm sure not many would know the 'shape' of my province - prob mistaken for New Zealand)

Posted by
1862 posts

The point of my question isn't if Canadians and Americans display the Maple Leaf. My question is if it's still done to show the world that you're not American or to hide from the world that you're American? I definitely see more Maple Leafs than Stars and Stripes in my travels.

Posted by
1245 posts

I have friends who wear Canada tees and carry Canada bags, etc etc on a lot of their travels. Their perception is that they're treated better. Who knows if its true.

I've seen lots of (seemingly) American tourists wearing a tee or a hat with their flag. Is it a statement? Or is it just a comfortable hat?

I would say on my trips prior to 2013 folks were disappointed to hear we are Canadian and not American. From the 2013 trip onwards, the opposite. Lots of very positive reaction to our Canadian-ness from then on. But the first assumption is always that we are Americans, even by Americans. They always lead with "what State are you from" and seem stunned when we say "actually Canada". My Polish friends want to know why Americans always first identify by state "I'm from Montana/California/wherever " but a Canadian never says they're from Ontario or Manitoba or wherever. (Well maybe after the last federal election that will start!).

I was once slapped by a Japanese tourist in the gift shop at Versailles. It was packed and I think she thought, without looking up, that I was her friend. She slapped some stupid trinket out of my hand and looked as shocked as I was when we had eye contact. At least she put me off a dumb purchase.

Posted by
1245 posts

And I'll add that two summers ago was the first time in all my life I was verbally abused in the States for being Canadian.

Posted by
4368 posts

"That's because they see big tips coming."
Nice try, but very wrong.

It was a joke Barbra!

Posted by
736 posts

First time politics was ever unsolicited, was during our trip in France last year. Three or four times, in what would have been a normal interaction with a local, they started a rant about the current US President: Never experienced that before. Of course the language barrier made the interactions somewhat less than entirely understandable. You have to master a different language to understand sarcasm. We haven't mastered French. So it was difficult to even know if they were mad at us, or signaling some sort of commiseration with their own politics. :) I got the overall feeling that most of it was commiseration.

Posted by
7585 posts

You’re probably right, Francis. Over the years I’ve heard “your president” referring to plenty of people I didn’t vote for.

Back in the 1970s, I’d be thanked for liberating France in one breath but also told I need to get out of Vietnam in the next, as if I were personally involved. LOL.

Posted by
12384 posts

Hard to be critical when you live in a country where people get beat up cause someone doesnt like the hat they are wearing.

Posted by
1862 posts

And I'll add that two summers ago was the first time in all my life I
was verbally abused in the States for being Canadian.

Details? That's a story I need to hear.

Posted by
1862 posts

It happens all over, I was abused in Scotland for being English!!!

This one doesn't surprise me. My coworker is a proud Scotsman and I made a comment regarding the castles in Edinburgh and Stirling being built on top of steep hills and with a serious look on his face he replied "that's because we love to pour boiling oil on the English." 🤣 It's even better when you hear it with a Scottish accent.

Posted by
4368 posts

I think you want the vocative, direct address, and therefore a comma is needed.
Not ". . . a joke Barbra" but ". . . a joke, Barbra."

I bet you're fun at parties!

Posted by
1245 posts

Allan, it happened in Ann Arbor Michigan. We were at an event and were sitting directly in front of the MC. He was doing the usual "and folks are here from California! Texas! New York! ", so I shouted "and Canada!". Then a bunch of guys behind us started booing and yelling, rather intimidatingly--"BOOOO CANADA". There was no mistaking it for anything other than what it was. Happily they were quite a small part of the crowd.

Posted by
1862 posts

Andrea;
That reminds me of a cruise we were on a couple of years ago from Quebec City to Boston, an announcement was made in the theatre that overnight the ship would be crossing the border from Canada to the US overnight. A group of seniors; I'd guess in the 65-70 age range cheered and shouted things like "thank God" and "it's about time."

Posted by
76 posts

@ Barbra - I haven't yet felt physically ill due to US politics. Bewildered, yes..sick, no.

Posted by
9793 posts

There are stupid people everywhere. Do you really think that is going to change?

There are people who stereotype others because of their nationality, religion, skin color or political beliefs. Do you really think that is going to change?

Mark Twain said: “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.”

Sadly, the people who need this the most are the ones who travel the least.

Keep traveling and educating those who have wrong ideas about where you are from but on the other hand don't stereotype others because they are different.

Posted by
31289 posts

Frank II,

Well said! I definitely agree, especially the part about "the people who need this the most are the ones who travel the least." Sad to say that's also true of some of my fellow Canadians. I know that as I've encountered them in Europe.

Posted by
4637 posts

When I travel I won't start political debate. But I won't try to avoid it, either. As Jennifer already hinted - it has something to do with our current president - by avoiding the debate people could think that I voted for him. Naturally I don't want them to think that I am dumb.

Posted by
12384 posts

Ilja, in France that might work half the time, in some countries you might get a better reception if they did think you voted for him.

One of the beauties of travel is learning that the world doesnt necessarily share your views. They might think you dumb, no matter who you voted for https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2019/04/07/right-wing-nationalists-are-rise-europe-theres-no-progressive-coalition-stop-them/%3foutputType=amp

Posted by
11450 posts

It’s a Maple leaf - not just a “ tree leaf “ , see it can be little digs like that that make people feel like some countries citizens don’t respect other countries .

Posted by
12384 posts

pat, you got me on that one. But what is curious is that what seems to stick out is that the symbol is worn so no one thinks you are American, while an American will wear his symbol so no one will mistake the fact that he is an American. The theme is American, yes or no; nothing to do with being Canadian. No judgment, just interesting. Also, why aren't Canadians Americans; Mexicans for that matter? I never understood that.

And the whole, they speak English, so they must be American discussion sort of ignored French Canada didn't it?

The other thing that sticks out is even with the well traveled non-Americans here, a belief that the current US president won the election with no votes; or they would realize that their personal comments on politics (makes me sick, etc) are offensive to about 50% of Americans. Actually, I think about 50% of Americans make the same poor judgment, so maybe it's our fault.

I have noticed in my travels that those few that I have discussed politics (maybe 1 conversation on each of my 3 trips a year) have been about evenly divided in thought or at least polite enough to discuss the subject objectively and with respect for all the views in the conversation. Of course I spend most of my time in the East which tends to be s bit more conservative in politics and old world in manners.

Posted by
4637 posts

James, "the current US President won the election with no votes." Of course, he must have won some votes, but still I don't know any other country than this one when one candidate wins the majority of votes and the other becomes president. This happened in recent past twice. Unfortunately under current system of electoral college the strength of your vote depends on your address. For example if you live in WyomIng your vote is seven and half time stronger than if you live in California. My question is: is this a democratic system? IMHO it is not. My next question is: Are we living in democratic country? I would like to answer yes, but how can we when my vote counts less than somebody's who lives in different state?

Posted by
1862 posts

I don't know any other country than this one when one candidate wins
the majority of votes and the other becomes president

I don't think it's that uncommon, in our Canadian Federal Election in the Fall, the Liberal Party won with fewer overall votes 33.1% to 34.4% than the Conservatives but have 23% more seats than the Conservatives in the House of Commons. The party that came in 3rd-the Bloc Quebecois only received 7.7% of the popular vote but have 25% more seats than the NDP which received almost 16% of the popular vote.

Posted by
1063 posts

"My coworker is a proud Scotsman"
Why a "proud" Scotsman, not just a racist.

Posted by
1882 posts

Sorry but this is totally getting off the track!!! Please enough already.

Posted by
504 posts

Yes, leave American elections out of this discussion, please.

Posted by
4637 posts

James, we all know why Trump is president. There are two basic reasons: One - obsolete electoral college. The second: Vladimir Putin. Almost everybody knows that he was an agent KGB in Dresden. Fewer people know that his specialty was disinformation and he showed us he is still good at it.

Posted by
12384 posts

Dav, Gail, you were right. I just need to keep my mouth shut and let them speak for themselves. So such more effective.