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Buying a Thanksgiving Turkey in Copenhagen (without remortgaging the house!)

Does anyone have any suggestions on buying turkeys to cook for Thanksgiving dinner in Copenhagen that are not prohibitively expensive? My wife will be visiting my daughter over Thanksgiving and it looks like bringing your own frozen turkeys in won't fly (sorry, I had to...). I was there last week and the only butcher I could find would cost about $10.00 a pound... Thanks in advance for any help!

Posted by
2879 posts

Whole turkeys aren't quite what they are in the US. They aren't fed hormones and are a LOT smaller than the 20lb+ behemoths you find here. We shopped for and bought a turkey the year we lived in northern Germany. I remember going to the grocery store and looking right past the few turkeys they had in the display. They were so small I thought they were just large, albeit skinny hens.

EDIT: look in larger grocery stores too in addition to butcher shops. Turkeys will probably be less expensive in regular, large grocery stores.

A bigger quandary can be finding cranberry sauce but raw cranberries can usually be found so you can make your own sauce. It used to be that you couldn't find canned pumpkin but now pumpkin (kerbis) everything is popular in Europe.

Have fun meshing a familiar tradition in new surroundings with your daughter!

Posted by
8293 posts

What about Thanksgiving chicken? Surely much less than $10 per pound and a cute story for the friends back home. Pretend it is a small turkey.

Posted by
2349 posts

I just have to add that turkeys in the US are not fed hormones. Americans just like a bigger bird, so that's what is produced to sell. Was the turkey in the Norman Rockwell painting pumped full of steroids?

Posted by
971 posts

Like Mona says, you won't find the giant, hormone soaked American versions over here. Usually they are between 5-7 kgs.
Whole turkey is not really something we eat a lot here, so you wont find it as a regular item in most supermarket, not even the large supermarkets. However it has caught on some places for christmas, instead of the traditional roast duck, so you can find whole turkey, but it's usually from butchers or straight from farms. And since it's a specialty item it usually also good quality, either free range or organic and hence a bit pricier. Though I can't bothered to convert the price you got to kroner and kilos, it's sound about right.
Your best bet would be to order it from a butchers shop.

Posted by
49 posts

I know this doesn't help your turkey search, but since several people persist in believing American turkeys are fed hormones, here's the real scoop from the USDA:

NO HORMONES ADDED — Hormones are not allowed in raising poultry. Therefore, the claim “no hormones added” or “raised without the use of hormones” cannot be used on the labels of poultry unless it is followed by a statement that says, “Federal regulations do not permit the use of hormones in poultry.”

Posted by
2349 posts

Anyway, now that we've established that you'll get a smaller turkey, will that work? A small one here is 8-10 lbs and will serve about 8-10 people. Will $100 be worth it to you? You can make mashed potatoes, gravy, dressing with no problem. But, gasp, will there be sweet potatoes??!! It's not Thanksgiving without them in my house, or my heart.

Posted by
6334 posts

Believe it or not, the real joy of Thanksgiving is not what you eat but who you eat it with. Who needs turkey anyway. My favorite childhood memories of Thanksgiving meals at my relatives' homes were usually goose (or ham) not turkey.

Posted by
4323 posts

Just buy a turkey breast, which will be more readily available (and size appropriate).