Please sign in to post.

Currency accepted in Croatia etc

Excited to have my Adriatic tour In April confirmed today! For incidental purchases when cash is needed are Euros accepted in Croatia? I know the official currency is Kuna.
Since the Adriatic tour also visits Bosnia and Slovenia, and I plan a side trip to Montenegro- what currency is accepted there? Many thanks...

Posted by
2693 posts

In Croatia, I have been only to Dubrovnik. There euros were readily accepted some places had prices quoted in euros but, of course, the exchange rate was horrendous.

Posted by
18741 posts

Slovenia and Montenegro are on the euro. Bosnia-Hercegovina has its own currency, the "convertible mark". I haven't been there since the advent of the euro and have no idea how widely accepted the latter might be.

I can tell you that I always get at least a bit of local currency even if I'm in a country for a short time. From experience, you cannot assume public-toilet minders will take anything other than their own currency, and that would be a bad place to need currency you did not have. In addition, you just never know when you'll want to buy something from a vendor who--very reasonably--expects to be paid in the local currency. I remember reading not too long ago about a government-managed sight in Croatia (possibly the walls in Dubrovnik) where only the local currency was accepted. That makes total sense to me, because I can't imagine expecting a museum in the US to accept Canadian dollars or Mexican pesos.

Someone commented in the past that the Rick Steves tour guides provide suggestions about how much currency might be needed as a tour passes through each country.

Posted by
4289 posts

For incidental purchases, like at the grocery store - no way.

Posted by
283 posts

When I was in Dubrovnik and Plitvice a few years ago, euros were not accepted in small shops and restaurants. Several times I saw people trying to use them only to be turned away. It would be easier to have at least a small stash of Kunas rather than trying to find places that accept your euros. I always have some local currency and if I don't spend it all I either donate on the flight home or save it as a souvenir.

Posted by
2021 posts

This info may help - we have been reading that when Croatia is fully accepted into the EU, they will convert to the Euro, which is scheduled for January 2022. So right now I wouldn’t worry too much, a lot can change by April. Even if they don’t change currency immediately, businesses may start accepting them. If you are staying other nights before or after the tour, ask the hotel. The B&Bs we always stay in with accept either, but only in cash, no CC.

Posted by
2130 posts

When you get to Croatia, the bankomat is your first stop. The currency is the kuna, and I hope it remains such for a long time. When a country goes to the euro, prices seem to go up. Prices in Montenegro are higher than in Croatia.

Posted by
5198 posts

You will be in Croatia about 7 Days on that tour, so plenty worth getting Kuna and not have to worry about it. Not sure if it has changed, but Croatia seemed much more a cash society to me, than use of credit cards. When I went, I did run into many small places with rooms that actually preferred euros, but your hotels will be paid for ahead.

For Bosnia, your only there a day or two, but still worth getting $50 worth out of an ATM, just plan on spending it all, a few snacks, a few souvenirs, spread some money around the economy.

Posted by
12324 posts

I am in Croatia now, and go to Bosnia from time to time. Get Kuna and Marks unless you only stay and visit tourist centers Even credit cards aren't always accepted in many places. Use a Bank ATM.

Posted by
2021 posts

Paul-of-the-frozen-north. I was hoping Croatia wouldn’t go to the euro either but everything we read in CroatiaWeek.hr hints it will happen. COVID pushed everything back awhile so we are hopeful. what my husband hears from his relatives is that the people don’t want it but the politicians want the move (salaries worth more?). Only time will tell.

Posted by
2021 posts

We were talking to a cousin in Croatia today and he mentioned that they are talking about postponing going to the Euro till 2023.

Posted by
139 posts

Many stores in Croatia have a sign by the cashdesk saying No Euros with a bar across the Euro logo.
For one, it is not legal tender - unless you need to buy a house. Then Euros avoid fluctuations. Of currency and heart rate.
For two, they are fed up with Italians demanding - in Italian - to pay only in Euros. Like they still own the place.
For three, you can get ripped off easily with exchange rates. They and you can.
For four, why should they also keep change in Euros? Keeping change is a pain already. Use small bills please.
For five, any ATM will give your card a choice in English of how many Kuna to withdraw, from 100 to 2000 usually. Do not accept their offer to convert it for you, even if it reduces the maximum you can withdraw. Use one by an open bank (RS advice)in case it eats it.
Avoid sketchy ones stuck in the walls next to the store you were just in. Reliable ATMs are by all major banks. Locals use them too.
This is assuming you told your bank which countries you were going to use the card in - in person. Computers cancel debit cards.:(
Kunas are small, light and easy to use. They let you pay the exact price, get change and tip people. Please tip people.
Same applies to Bosnian KM Marks. Paying for your Mostar Turkish coffee in Marks is part of the pleasure of being in Bosnia.
You can also get Euros out of any bank ATM in a Euro country. Good to save for your next trip to Europe.
Don't expect the Euro in Croatia for some time, and as noted, go before it comes in. In Germany, prices doubled overnight.

Posted by
12324 posts

Interesting thing about Montenegro. Their currency became essentially worthless after the war so they chose to go on the Euro.

Basically they wrote the EU and said deal with it, we are doing it. It is tolerated by the EU.

In Croatia a lot of the tourist venues, like wineries prefer Euro, but most shops don't.

But there are plenty of exchange houses and ATMs so its not a problem.

At least this was my experiences a week ago.

Posted by
831 posts

we did a catamaran trip in 2018 starting in Trojir. No one wanted the local currency everyone wanted Euros.

Posted by
6698 posts

Places or businesses that want you to pay in Euros will use a markup over the going exchange rate which is pure profit. That is how they make more money. Be smart and use the local currency (decline to pay in Euros and anything else) so you won't be subjected to a premium.

Posted by
2130 posts

we did a catamaran trip in 2018 starting in Trojir. No one wanted the local currency everyone wanted Euros.

I have been to Croatia 5 times since 2011. I have never encountered this. The only thing that I found that will accept Euros is places like Sobes. Stores, restaurants, bars want Kuna. Most places want Kuna. It's the currency of Croatia.

Posted by
2021 posts

It all depends……we just booked two private tours through Dubrovnik Riviera Tours (Rick’s books) and after a 10% down payment, he emailed me we could pay the balance in euros, kuna, or dollars. A private driver who we hired for airport pick ups quoted us in euros but will accept kuna also. One B&B will accept either, while another will only accept kuna - no credit cards. I will book an evening walking tour and it is in euros. My deduction is that a business dealing with tourists will accept euros, but small businesses which rely on locals do not. Such as bakeries, coffee shops, local stores. The more expensive stores will accept credit cards.
I guess my long winded answer to your question is no, for incidental purchases you will need kuna.

Posted by
18741 posts

The other question is what conversion rates they have used to establish the prices they charge in the various currencies. If you let me use a conversion rate of my own choosing, I could be convinced to accept my government pension in euros or pounds every month. Of course, I'd insist on being able to adjust the conversion rate every month if I wanted to.

If most of a Croatian company's revenue is ultimately used to pay the employees' salaries (and they then use it to pay for housing, food, etc.) in Croatia, that money is going to need to be converted to kuna eventually. They're not going to want to lose money on that conversion. Conversion rates vary from day to day, so they will, at the very least, pad the rate to protect against weakening of the dollar/euro before they get the money changed to kuna. And they're going to want some compensation for the aggravation.

A tourist who just wants to buy a souvenir for the equivalent of $10 or $20 and doesn't have a no-fee credit card or ATM card to use might lose no more than a trivial amount by paying in dollars or euros. Someone spending more money is almost certain to take a bath, but he probably won't know it unless he goes online to check the interbank rate and does some math.