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Visa card

Just an FYI, I haven't read the small print yet, but I just got an email from my Amazon Visa card through Chase bank and they are now offering no foreign transaction fees, plus no annual fee! I have had horrible customer service with Captol One and hate using their card because I don't want to support their business, so this makes me very happy! Worth checking into...

Posted by
250 posts

MrsEB, I had the card already as I do a lot of my shopping via Amazon and the card gives 5% back on Amazon purchases! I need to check out that WallStreet article...

Posted by
765 posts

My husband and I were just talking about this the other day. Gonna add it to my list to get. England in June, here I come!

Posted by
3224 posts

If you already have the Amazon card, the new features automatically take effect. How much you get back from your purchases depends on if you are a Prime member or not and the max amount of 5% is for only things purchased on Amazon. Non Prime members get less.

More and more cards offer no foreign fees, so look around to find the one that gives you what you need or want the most.

Posted by
2023 posts

Fascinating. I had not seen this, nor yet received information showing it, but in checking my account online it says it's there. I have requested a new Cardmember agreement to have the documentation.

For those not aware of this card, this card gets you 3% cashback on all Amazon purchases, 2% cashback on gas, restaurants, and drug stores, and 1% on all other purchases. It used to be that you had to cash in the points by applying them to Amazon purchases, but you can now get these as a statement credit or such. There does not appear to be any limit on the cashback.. In order to get 5% cashback on Amazon purchases you must be in Amazon Prime. It is of course chipped, but not PIN'd. This now makes an even better option than our Capone card for international provided if restaurants overseas properly code. It also has auto rental collision damage insurance/waiver.

Posted by
1005 posts

I believe that all credit cards have a PIN so that you can get a cash advance at an ATM machine. Ask your bank or Amazon to send it to you. In most cases, when you use this PIN in Europe at a shop, hotel, restaurant, or ticket machine, it will be processed as a normal transaction, not a cash advance. However, if you use it at a European ATM to withdraw cash, it will be treated as a cash advance.

Posted by
688 posts

Can anyone with the card already tell me if you have multiple users does it keep users' purchases separate? I have children with cards and everyone in the family has a budget to keep to and that feature helps me keep track of everyone.

Posted by
2023 posts

All of our cards all have the same # so our adult kids have to report to us for bookkeeping. Our CapOne Mastercards are all different numbers on the same account and transactions are identified.

T -- now why on earth would one take money from an ATM machine to get cash at usurious interest rates when one can have bank accounts with debit cards for that express purpose? In any event, Chase credit cards are Chip only, they are not doing PINs. They will provide a PIN for accessing ATMs, but that is for your account, not your card.

Posted by
3224 posts

Since nearly every credit card issued in Europe is chip & PIN, everything is set up there to expect a PIN. So having the PIN that goes with your credit card is helpful. When asked at kiosks and other unattended places, enter the PIN to help complete the transaction. You will NOT be charged as a cash advance, only a purchase, unless you actually use your card in an ATM and get cash. You can use a random 4 digit number which some have reported as working, but that can be iffy.

If you will be going to Europe, ask your banks/card issuers for the PINs that go with your cards. They will tell you the PIN is only for cash advances. Tell them you know and want it anyway (no further explanation of why you want it is required at this point and will only confuse the person you are talking to). It will be mailed to you and should arrive wherever you receive your mail in around a week.

And yes, every credit card has a PIN associated with it (even the Chase ones). It is just not used in the US.

Posted by
741 posts

Just saw this notice from Chase. I've had the Amazon card for several years and use it extensively. I actually like using the points for Amazon purchases. Makes me feel like I'm getting "free" stuff. ;-)

I'm glad to see the foreign transaction change. Now I have both a Visa and Mastercard to use abroad without fees, plus an American Express for backup, but I wouldn't expect to use the AMEX overseas at all now. And, of course, I have a debit card from my bank for ATM use which has very low fees, if any (when I used it in Paris a couple of times, I never saw any fees at all show up on my account later).

Posted by
2023 posts

We have had no problem using our chipped credit card abroad without a PIN, just as there was no problem with this card before a chipped version was issued to us. For ticket machines we simply use out bank's debit card, which is PIN'd.

Posted by
329 posts

This is a great card. I wanted to emphasize that for your points, you can have cash deposited directly into your checking or savings account. I used to always get Amazon points, now I get the cash. I figured out that if I use the accrued points to purchase something on Amazon, I get no additional points for the new purchase. The alternative: get the cash deposited to my checking account, I then use my Amazon credit card to make the same new purchase and I do qualify for points for the new item. Of course this is worthwhile only if you pay off your balance each month.

BTW I was in London for Christmas and came home to my Amazon Chase credit card bill ---and the announcement of no foreign fees. Rats! I missed it by just a week or two. That being said, I only had $42 worth of foreign transaction fees which in the whole scheme of things was reasonable.

Posted by
2023 posts

SuzieeQQ--actually, the only points you lose are the 3% cashback on the points applied portion of your next purchase, you still get the full points on the charged amount. So having earned points at 3% of an initial purchase and then applying them at some point later on, you would lose 3% of the 3% discount, or in other words, always still be getting 2.91% as you go along. Example $100 purchase, and you get 3% cashback, that's $3. Your next purchase is $100, but you apply the $3, so your card is charged $97, which generates $2.91. Your next purchase is $100, less $2.91, your card is charged $97.09, generating $2.91. Similarly applying the 1 and 2% bonuses to a future purchase reduces them .97% and 1.94% ongoing. I had to learn these for billing my kids when they used our Amazon account, as it's only recently that they changed and allowed you to take the cash rather than having to apply it to Amazon purchases.

Now what would be interesting to see is if they recognize foreign restaurants for the 2% cashback. These things are identified by the merchant's code, and I do not know whether US codes would be given to foreign merchants.

Posted by
3224 posts

Merchant codes are merchant codes. Other than some specific airlines and hotels and other travel related companies who have their own, the codes are not country specific and should be the same for a restaurant anywhere in the world. 5812 is 5812.

Posted by
13930 posts

Discover is getting more wide-spread in Europe. For several years they've been advertising no foreign fees.

I've been using it for my trip to Italy - less than two weeks away. If there's a Diner's Club option, I enter my Discover card and most of the time it's worked. I've paid for a hotel, a rental car and a couple of guided tours with different companies.

Posted by
18 posts

I know this is an old thread, but incase anyone new is reading it I just wanted to give everyone a head's up:

I own this card and tried using it to purchase train tickets in Paris. It DID NOT work. However, it worked in other merchant stores. I think some machines aren't able to take the card, so beware of that.

If anyone else experienced this, let me know!! I'm curious what the official reason for this is, and if I will encounter this issue again in Italy.

Posted by
1076 posts

The machine in the train station requires a PIN and CHIP card. Most US credit cards are CHIP and SIGNATURE. (Why oh why are we so far behind in technology?) Some cards will work in these machines using the PIN supplied to you for getting cash at an ATM. No, you will not be charged for a cash withdrawal if you use this feature at ticket machine, etc.

Posted by
2794 posts

I've had an Andrews FCU chip card, with PIN, for several years, and although it's technically a chip and signature card, it's always worked in machines requiring a PIN, such as unattended gas stations and train stations, including the RER in Paris. Interestingly, on my recent trip to France, I lost my Andrews card near the end of the trip, so I had to switch to a chip card that I didn't have a PIN for. When I had used the Andrews card at gas station machines, it asked for a PIN, and then approved the transaction when I typed in the PIN. However, when I used my BOA replacement at a gas station machine, it simply approved the transaction w/o asking for a PIN.